Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "Gothic tribes" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
A sourcebook 1700–1820
Editors: E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

The aim of this book is to make available a body of texts connected with the cultural phenomenon known as Gothic writing. The book includes many of the critical writings and reviews which helped to constitute Gothic as a distinct genre, by revisions of the standards of taste, by critique and by outright attack. Together, this material represents a substantial part of the discursive hinterland of Gothic. The chapters on supernaturalism, on the aesthetics of Gothic, and on opposition to Gothic contain a number of the standard references in any history of the genre. They are juxtaposed with other more novel items of journalism, religious propaganda, folk tradition, non-fictional narrative, poetry and so on. The book also includes chapters on the politics of Gothic, before and after the French Revolution. Therefore, it includes extracts from Tacitus and Montesquieu, the authorities that eighteenth-century commentators most often referred to. The story of Britain's Gothic origins, although implicitly progressivist, was to be re-fashioned in the cultural and sociological theories critical of modern society: that vital eighteenth-century trend known as primitivism. The book also broadly covers the period from the height of the Gothic vogue (in the mid-1790s) to the mid-nineteenth century. The author hopes that the book will encourage students to follow new routes, make new connections, and enable them to read set works on the syllabus in more adventurous and historically informed ways.

Abstract only
E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

the French Revolution, will prove more surprising, perhaps even controversial. Anyone interested in the significance of the word ‘Gothic’ before Walpole employed it to describe his tale The Castle of Otranto will want to know more about the word’s existing political, ideological and cultural meanings. The view that the English owe the peculiar perfection of their institutions, manners and customs to the Gothic tribes

in Gothic documents
Tim William Machan

Scandinavia, Scythia, Thrace, Dacia, and Mysia’. The English, so named because of the angle (‘angulus’) of land they inhabited near modern Denmark, descend from three specific Gothic tribes: Bede’s Angles, Saxons, and Jutes. As for the Goths in general, ‘their fame has been made sufficiently famous among all nations’. They were ‘more clever’ than the Greeks and had migrated into Thrace before the time of the Argonauts, so that even Orpheus, in effect, is Nordic. Known for their accomplishments in justice, civility, medicine, and law, the Goths (and Norse) were thus the

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
Tim William Machan

Icelandic poetry: these will be allowed to be in all respects congenial, because of the great affinity between the two languages, and between the nations who spoke them. They were both Gothic Tribes, and used two not very different dialects of the same Gothic language. Accordingly we find a very strong resemblance in their versification, phraseology and poetic allusions, &c. the same being in a great measure common to both nations. 39 In imagining the skald as the forerunner of the minstrel, Percy not only connected modern popular English poetry to medieval

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

tendency to ascribe the presence of political Liberty in Britain to the incoming Gothic tribes: far from embodying the principles of universal equality, Anglo-Saxon government in his account was invariably biased in favour of the interests of landed property. If the Anglo-Saxon period was to be perceived as an age of unprecedented political liberty at all, this liberty contained the

in Gothic Renaissance
Abstract only
Class, locality and British punk
Matthew Worley

styles and subcultural forms emerging from the debris.29 But even amongst those who remained avowedly punk, there existed by the turn of the decade a mesh of mutating sub-scenes: the anarchist bands inspired by Crass; the proto-gothic tribes gathered around Siouxsie and the Banshees and the early Adam and the Ants; the hardening punk thrash pioneered by Discharge; the guttersnipe ruck ‘n’ roll of the Cockney Rejects; not to mention the numerous provincial scenes concentrated on local venues, record labels, squats, fanzines and shops. Oi!, then, was rooted in a post

in Fight back
Abstract only
E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

’s carefully balanced position meant that his political legacy was a tricky one for admiring Britons. Radical Whigs could take comfort from Montesquieu’s assertion that the spirit governing England’s laws was the principle of political liberty, one arising out of the manners of the Gothic tribes, while conservative Whigs, such as Edmund Burke, could point to Montesquieu

in Gothic documents