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Kim Akass

If Sex and the City showed us that motherhood is not necessarily a natural and desired state for all women, the next series from HBO, as well as consolidating the cable channel’s success in the original drama market, offered us an alternative insight into attitudes towards motherhood – particularly the impact of mothers on their male offspring

in Mothers on American television
Kim Akass

Much has been written about the adaptation of A Song of Ice and Fire to Game of Throne s (HBO, 2011–19) – its historical veracity, 1 as an adapted text, 2 audience engagement with the series, 3 the philosophy that informs it, 4 and as part of the wider gendered transmedia universe 5 – and this is only a very brief

in Mothers on American television
Kim Akass

is not much to choose between the ideologies being discussed here. It also reveals the pertinence of reclaiming nineteenth-century sexual mores in the twenty-first century. It is not too surprising that Deadwood , screened as it was on HBO, the underbelly of the networks and purveyor of the darker side of life, enters into a dialogue with the sex wars raging in America

in Mothers on American television
Kim Akass

Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman and their respective production companies in the creation of Big Little Lies (HBO, 2017–19). 9 In this final chapter, I will look at what happens to mothers on television when more women are employed behind the scenes of a production. How do female producers, directors and writers make sense of maternity? Does it necessarily follow that

in Mothers on American television
Kim Akass

romantic comedy, that saw HBO’s breakout hit series Sex and the City , shine a light on a specific milieu of millennial women and how they negotiated life as single women. Screened in an era defined by postfeminism and in an economy that was enjoying the largest growth that we would see this century, the series had much to reveal about women and friendship and became synonymous

in Mothers on American television
Kim Akass

If Livia Soprano’s depression at the loss of her husband is paid short shrift in The Sopranos , the loss of Six Feet Under ’s patriarch is central to the narrative and the Fisher family. The series premiered on HBO in June 2001 and, coming hot on the heels of HBO’s breakout hits Sex and the City and The Sopranos , meant that much

in Mothers on American television
Driving Desire on Television
Zoë Shacklock

The open road is popularly imagined as both cinematic and male, a space suited to the scope afforded by the cinema and the breadth demanded by the male psyche. However, while these connotations are ingrained within the aesthetics of driving, its kinaesthetics – the articulations between bodies, movement and space – have more in common with television and with stories of women’s desire. Drawing from Iris Marion Young’s theories of gendered embodiment, this article argues that driving, television and female desire are all marked by the same contradictions between movement and stability, and between public and private. It analyses two recent television programmes concerned with women behind the wheel – Black Mirror’s ‘San Junipero’ (Netflix, 2016) and the first two seasons of Big Little Lies (HBO, 2017–present) – to argue that driving on television affords a space through which to negotiate feminine embodiment, agency and desire.

Film Studies
The path to economic crisis in Scotland
Author:

This book takes a body of ethnographic data collected in 2001-2, during a year's fieldwork at the Bank of Scotland (BoS) and HBOS, and revisits it from the perspective of the 2014-16 period. It explores the tension between the 'ethnographic present' of the author's original research and the unavoidable alteration of perspective on that data that the economic crisis has created. The original research had been planned to take place in the BoS but in 2001, before the research began, BoS had merged with the Halifax to form HBOS. The book provides a long-term historical perspective on BoS/HBOS, from inception to the 2008 financial crisis, and then a consideration of the nature of historical explanation, under the rubric of 'theory'. The main attempts to explain the proximate causes of the 2008 crisis, as well as more encompassing political economic arguments about the trajectory and dynamics of capitalism are examined. The concept of 'culture' as applied to both national groups, Scots and English, and organizations, BoS and Halifax, are also dealt with. The book examines other governing concepts such as organisational change in the business world and social change, identity and the way Scottish and English experience their own personhood, and comparative nature of ethnographic research. The conclusion reviews and draws together the themes of the book, returning to the overarching question of historical perspective and explanation.

Rescuing John From Cincinnati from the HBO narrative
Robert Watts

On Sunday 10 June 2007, at 9.56 p.m. EST, the premium cable network HBO first transmitted what would become one of the most discussed, debated and minutely deconstructed moments in the history of American television drama. At the close of the final episode of their era-defining hit series The Sopranos (HBO, 1999–2007) the action simply stopped, apparently mid-scene, with an abrupt cut to black. After almost ten seconds of agonisingly dead air, the closing credits appeared. Fans would long debate whether the cut away from a close-up of

in Substance / style
Kim Akass

-nonsense, tough love attitude, and was one of the few sitcom mothers to have been afforded any extensive critical appraisal. 17 Roseanne certainly broke barriers for the way motherhood could be represented and arguably opened doors for later sitcoms featuring out of the ordinary mothers, particularly HBO’s Sex and the City , which I will return to later, and Friends , which

in Mothers on American television