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Building a queer counter-memory
Agata Dziuban
,
Eugen Januschke
,
Ulrike Klöppel
,
Todd Sekuler
, and
Justyna Struzik

should capture. That’s why I allowed the filming. 1 Mobilising a queer theoretical framework, by which we mean embracing unhappiness, ephemerality, and instability, this chapter attempts to put into words some of what goes ‘without words’ in the understandings and narrations of engagements with the HIV/AIDS

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Activism, politics, and medicine in Norway, 1983–90
Ketil Slagstad
and
Anne Kveim Lie

HIV/AIDS was from the beginning a heavily politicised disease. 1 The epidemic exposed conflicting value systems and disagreements within science, medicine, public health, and clinical practice. It raised challenges to the power of doctors to privilege some while marginalising others, and it exposed how medicine constructs boundaries. The construction of ‘risk groups’ by

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Daryl Leeworthy

infection from shared intravenous needles. This lack of understanding of how HIV/AIDS is transmitted continued into the twenty-first century, with a report in the Cardiff-based South Wales Echo published to mark World AIDS Day 2001 noting a stark increase in the number of positive test results in Wales that year. From around twenty a year for much of the 1990s, the figure increased more than three-fold in the

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Janet Weston

The impact of HIV/AIDS on prisons (and vice versa) has received minimal attention within histories of the epidemic. Yet, researchers agree that ‘HIV hit prisons early and it hit them hard’. 1 Prisons were flagged as locations of concern very early on. Their residents, like other already-marginalised groups whose lives became entangled with HIV/AIDS, became a source of

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Hannah J. Elizabeth

lives of HIV-positive mothers in Edinburgh were shaped by interdisciplinary collaborative HIV/AIDS care and activism born out of the daily fight for resources, information, space, and empathetic treatment for women and their families. Activism such as this was often indistinguishable from survival or best practice, occurring in the clinic and the home, in acts of care performed by medical practitioners

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
New and Regional Perspectives

As the AIDS crisis of the 1980s and 1990s recedes from popular memory, researchers are once again beginning to engage with the subject from historical perspectives. This collection brings together some of the exciting new work emerging from this resurgence, addressing essential but much less well-known histories of HIV/AIDS.

Focusing on regions of Western Europe, Histories of HIV/AIDS introduces aspects of the epidemic from places including Scotland, Wales, Italy, Norway, the Netherlands, Ireland, and Switzerland, and draws attention to the experiences and activities of often-overlooked people: sex workers, drug users, mothers, nurses, social workers, and those living and working in prisons. It also examines the challenges, opportunities, and risks at the heart of how we archive and remember this epidemic. Highlighting the importance of understanding local and national contexts, transnational interactions, and heterogeneous forms of policy, activism, and expertise, it encourages attention to the complexity of these histories and their ongoing importance today.

Of particular interest to historians of modern Europe and health, area studies specialists, and those working with archives and museums, this book is an essential addition to HIV/AIDS studies and histories.

A Realistic Ambition?
Pierre Mendiharat
,
Elba Rahmouni
, and
Léon Salumu

Despite a concerted international effort in recent decades that has yielded significant progress in the fight against HIV/AIDS, the disease continues to kill large numbers of people, especially in certain regions like rural Ndhiwa district in Homa Bay County, Kenya. Although there is still no definitive cure or vaccine, UNAIDS has set an ambitious goal of ending the epidemic by 2030, specifically via its 90-90-90 (treatment cascade) strategy – namely that 90 per cent of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Condoms, adolescence and time

During the mid-1980s, the object of the condom became associated with the prevention of HIV/AIDS. This book investigates the consequences of this shift in the object's meaning. Focusing on the US, British and Australian contexts, it addresses the impact of the discourse of safer sex on our lives and, in particular, the lives of adolescents. Addressing AIDS public health campaigns, sex education policies, sex research on adolescence and debates on the eroticisation of safer sex, the book looks at how the condom has affected our awareness of ourselves, of one another and of our futures. In its examination of the condom in the late twentieth century, it critically engages with a range of literatures, including those concerned with sexuality, adolescence, methods, gender and the body.

Abstract only
Janet Weston
and
Hannah J. Elizabeth

and forgetting have come to the fore through memorials, exhibitions, and newly established archives. 2 This milestone therefore also marks nearly forty years of arts, humanities, and social science work that responds to HIV and AIDS. From its earliest days, the political, cultural, and social aspects of HIV/AIDS were recognised, and historical analysis played a central role. 3 A revival of

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Open Access (free)
Duncan McLean

local faith actors and their communities are often at the forefront of a crisis, as was belatedly recognised in the response to HIV/AIDS and Ebola. Learning from that experience, and comparatively speaking, the author argues that engagement with local faith actors was generally far more effective in COVID-19-related activities. Whether in terms of speed or the diversity of support provided, this shift holds important lessons for both the faith-based and secular streams of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs