Author: Christina Morin

This book addresses the intriguing incongruity between naming Charles Robert Maturin as a 'well-known' author of the Romantic period and the lack of any real critical analysis of his works in the past thirty years. The central thesis of the book is that Maturin's novels provide the key to a new understanding of Irish national fiction as a peculiarly haunted form of literature. Specifically, it argues that Maturin's too often overlooked body of fiction forcefully underscores the haunting presence of the past and past literary forms in early nineteenth-century Irish literature. It is a presence so often omitted and/or denied in current critical studies of Irish Romantic fiction. The book represents a project of ghost-hunting and ghost-conjuring. It investigates the ways in which Maturin's fourth novel attempts to build on the ruins of the Irish nation by describing the fissures produced by religious sectarianism in the country. The book makes use of the rarely consulted correspondence between Maturin and the publisher Archibald Constable. It does this to emphasise the manner in which Maturin's completion of his novel, Melmoth the wanderer was at all times crowded by, and, indeed, infiltrated with, his work on competing texts. These include books of sermons, Gothic dramas, short stories, and epic poems interspersed with prose narrative.

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Aspects of Gothic in Dickens‘s Fiction
Gill Ballinger

In recent years Dickens‘s use of Gothic has been the focus of some diverse and absorbing critical interpretations. This paper seeks to address in more detail the ways in which Gothic features in Dickens‘s various responses to the law in his work. Scenes of madness, hauntings and murder all feature as ways of punishing transgressive individuals in the form of melodramatic substitutes to state law in OliverTwist and Barnaby Rudge, and the Gothic affects justice in later novels such as LittleDorrit.,As Bleak House illustrates, the Gothic also enhances the horror of the law. Dickens employs the genre in different ways within specific texts, such as ThePickwick Papers. How the diverse uses of Gothic pertain to the law in Dickens‘s fiction are considered in this paper.

Gothic Studies
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Spectres of Maturin; or, the ghosts of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

making no claims to producing the desired literary biography of Maturin, nevertheless attempts to recuperate an author of recognisable significance who has been all but forgotten for far too long. H(a)unting ghosts: Romantic Ireland’s spectral inheritance The central thesis of this book is that Maturin’s novels provide the key to a new understanding of Irish national fiction as a

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
Jodey Castricano

In Shirley Jackson‘s novel The Haunting of Hill House, the tropes of haunting, telepathy, and clairvoyance serve to remind us that there is more to alterity than the shattering of the autos. In Jackson‘s novel, these tropes lead us to reconsider what we mean by subjectivity for, beyond the question of consciousness, they also destabilize what Sonu Shamdasani refers to as the “singular notion of the ‘unconscious’ that has dominated twentieth century thought,” especially via Freudian psychoanalysis. By drawing upon Carl Jung‘s theory of synchronicity in relation to quantum theory, this paper argues that Jackson‘s novel challenges certain classical models of human consciousness and subjectivity as well as psychoanalytic models of interpretation.

Gothic Studies
Rereading Melmoth the wanderer
Christina Morin

its troubled history. Haunting literary production and criticism long after its publication, as earlier noted, 10 Melmoth possesses current Gothic fiction and its analysis. At the same time, however, it is itself possessed by the ghosts of the past, both literary and historical. As with Maturin’s other novels, the voices of the then seemingly dead Gothic novel, other contemporary and eighteenth

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
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Room for more: the future for Maturin research
Christina Morin

’s reference to the preternaturally youthful bust of Maturin owned by Lady Jane Wilde, Maturin remains, like one of his own characters, an unearthly presence haunting the works of countless authors, contemporary and otherwise. This continued influence is most readily apparent in the reception of and unabated fascination with Melmoth the wanderer since its publication in 1820. Almost immediately republished in English in 1821

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
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The life and works
Christina Morin

presence is there in the five-act play, Melmoth the wanderer , produced in Boston in 1915, as it is in the hero’s naming of his car ‘Melmoth’ in Nabokov’s Lolita (1955), and in the many references to Maturin’s wanderer in John Banville’s oeuvre . Haunting literary imagination long after Maturin himself had died, Maturin’s phantom exhorts us to remember, to pay our dues to, and to bear witness to an

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
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The wild Irish boy and the national tale
Christina Morin

female one over the course of the eighteenth century and into the early nineteenth century. As he does so, however, Maturin also seeks to reveal the ghosts haunting Ireland and Irish literary production. Through its frequent recourse to Gothic imagery and themes, The wild Irish boy poignantly highlights its Gothic literary ancestry. At the same time, it attests to the continued spectral presence of

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
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The textual ruins of The Milesian chief
Christina Morin

’s career in general but also in The Milesian chief in particular, Owenson’s national tale proves only one of many literary presences in the novel. Also haunting the pages of Maturin’s text is de Staël’s Corinne and an earlier work that fundamentally echoes in Corinne : Torquato Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata ( Jerusalem delivered ) (1575). While Maturin’s access to Tasso’s epic poem is

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
The medium and media of Fatal revenge
Christina Morin

suggest that its story of familial decay by way of a return of the violence of the past is entirely relevant to Ireland. Footnotes and paratextual commentary such as these manifest the haunting presence of Ireland and contemporary Irish issues in the novel. Just as the text is possessed by the Gothic, and the prose narrative by poetry, therefore, Fatal revenge reveals constant traces of the spectres of

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction