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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Hester Pulter (c. 1605–1678) Hester Pulter was born in or around 1605 in Dublin, into a well-connected and literary English family. Her father Sir James Ley, first Earl of Marl­ borough, was at the time Chief Justice of the King’s Bench in Ireland; he went on to become the Lord Chief Justice and Lord High Treasurer of England, and he was also a writer, described as ‘that old man eloquent’ by Milton in a sonnet addressed to Hester’s sister Margaret in 1642. Hester’s mother, Mary Petty, was a first cousin of the Oxford antiquarian Anthony à Wood. Hester was

in Women poets of the English Civil War

For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

, enabling full comparison of the different versions that were printed in 1650 and 1678. Hester Pulter’s poems occur only in University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32, which is therefore our copy-text. Katherine Philips sits at the other end of the spectrum to Pulter in terms of textual complexity: there are two printed editions of Poems (1664 and 1667), of contested degrees of authorial sanction, an early autograph manuscript (known as ‘Tutin’), and several other manuscript volumes, including the important Rosania manuscript compiled after her death

in Women poets of the English Civil War
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Noses on sale
Emily Cock

skin or flesh from another person accompanied, then overtook understanding of the actual autograft operation. This gained currency in medical and then satirical works, initially as a case for demonstrating ‘sympathy’ as a physiological and then emotional phenomenon. These allograft accounts incorporate a further significant shift, as the identity of the body from whom the graft was purchased moved from a male slave to a male servant – via, in one anomalous manuscript account, the poet Lady Hester Pulter's own leg. Pulter's poem offering to give her flesh for the

in Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture
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Mark Robson

I ‘Which voice would speak of voice?’ 1 The implications of Jean-Luc Nancy’s question will resonate throughout this chapter, since the focus will be on what will be for most readers an unknown voice, that of the seventeenth-century royalist woman poet Hester Pulter. 2 The female voice has become a common concept

in The sense of early modern writing
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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

and Paratext, Manuscript and Print (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013) Hester Pulter Archer, Jayne, ‘A “Perfect Circle”? Alchemy in the Poetry of Hester Pulter’, Literature Compass, 2 (2005), DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-4113.2005.00160.x (accessed 27 April 2017) 21 Women poets of the English Civil War Brady, Andrea, ‘Dying with Honour: Literary Propaganda and the Second English Civil War’, Journal of Military History, 70 (2006): 9–30 Chedgzoy, Kate, Women’s Writing in the British Atlantic World: Memory, Place and History, 1550–1700 (Cambridge: Cambridge

in Women poets of the English Civil War
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To supply the scandalous want of that obvious part
Emily Cock

engage with the performative nature of gender itself. 20 Gender, and especially masculinity, is a key consideration in the present study: the restriction of surgical knowledge to men and the fashioning of a professional surgical identity influenced the ways surgeons engaged with a controversial procedure such as rhinoplasty, and how women excluded from this knowledge could engage with the technology. Lady Hester Pulter, who offers the only sustained female-authored engagement with rhinoplasty, reveals an understanding based on broader circulation of the incorrect

in Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture
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The sense of early modern writing
Mark Robson

to give an account of the whole of the interest of the early modern period’s writers in questions of sense. At times the examples chosen may seem a bit obvious (including Shakespeare and Sidney), at others wilfully obscure (including Hester Pulter and Ro:Ba:). The discussion will make frequent reference to non-literary as well as literary materials, often in an attempt to provide a minimal degree of

in The sense of early modern writing
Genre and literary tradition in Katherine Philips’s early poetry
Gillian Wright

in the mid-seventeenth century to engage productively and diversely with generic forms (Anne Bradstreet, Lucy Hutchinson and Hester Pulter all offer instructive contemporary parallels), her evident awareness of her own literary inheritance (unequalled even by Bradstreet), her posthumous visibility as a woman poet and her formative influence on later women writers collectively signify her unique importance within women’s literary history. Her engagement with literary genre marks a key foundational moment for English women’s poetry. Another reason why Philips is of

in Early modern women and the poem