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Black Women as Surrogates of Liberation in James Baldwin’s If Beale Street Could Talk
Marquita R. Smith

This essay analyzes how James Baldwin’s late novel If Beale Street Could Talk represents Black women’s care work in the face of social death as an example of how Black women act as surrogates for Black liberation giving birth to a new world and possibilities of freedom for Black (male) people. Within the politics of Black nationalism, Black women were affective workers playing a vital role in the (re)creation of heteronormative family structures that formed the basis of Black liberation cohered by a belief in the power of patriarchy to make way for communal freedom. This essay demonstrates how Beale Street’s imagining of freedom centers not on what Black women do to support themselves or each other, but on the needs of the community at large, with embodied sacrifice as a presumed condition of such liberation.

James Baldwin Review
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James Baldwin and the "Closeted-ness" of American Power
David Jones

This article reads the work of James Baldwin in dialogue with that of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. Taking its cue from Baldwin’s claim that Americans “live […] with something in [their] closet” that they “pretend […] is not there,” it explores his depiction of a United States characterized by the “closeted-ness” of its racial discourse. In doing so, the article draws on Sedgwick’s work concerning how the containment of discourses pertaining to sexuality hinges on the closeting of non-heteronormative sexual practices. Reconceptualizing Sedgwick’s ideas in the context of a black, queer writer like Baldwin, however, problematizes her own insistence on the “historical gay specificity” of the epistemology she traces. To this end, this article does not simply posit a racial counterpart to the homosexual closet. Rather, reflecting Baldwin’s insistence that “the sexual question and the racial question have always been entwined,” I highlight here the interpretive possibilities opened up by intersectional analyses that view race, sexuality, and national identity as coextensive, reciprocal epistemologies.  

James Baldwin Review
Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet, Sarah Chynoweth, Sarah Martin, Chen Reis, Henri Myrttinen, Philipp Schulz, Lewis Turner, and David Duriesmith

-sex desire is a key driver of sexual violence against men and boys, and that perpetrators must therefore be gay men, is a common misconception. This misunderstanding wrongly conflates same-sex sex with sexual violence and is grounded in heteronormativity and harmful gender stereotypes ( Davies, Pollard et al. , 2006 ). Sexual violence is a sexualised expression of violence, and when it is perpetrated against men, it is often an assertion of (hypermasculine) power over another man. As noted

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

), ‘patriarchy’ refers to a system of power relations based on gender norms, and which perpetuates the privileging of hegemonic masculinities, heteronormativity, cisgender-normativity and normative endosex bodies. Patriarchy is the foundation of gender inequalities, understood as the inequalities rooted in people’s sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) and sex – and/or ‘the degree to which they conform with gender norms and the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women’s fiction, 1850s–1930s
Author: Emma Liggins

Women outside marriage between 1850 and the Second World War were seen as abnormal, threatening, superfluous and incomplete, whilst also being hailed as ‘women of the future’. Before 1850 odd women were marginalised, minor characters, yet by the 1930s spinsters, lesbians and widows had become heroines. This book considers how Victorian and modernist women's writing challenged the heterosexual plot and reconfigured conceptualisations of public and private space in order to valorise female oddity. It offers queer readings of novels and stories by women writers, from Charlotte Bronte, Elisabeth Gaskell, Ella Hepworth Dixon and Netta Syrett to May Sinclair, Radclyffe Hall, Clemence Dane, Winifred Holtby and Virginia Woolf. This interdisciplinary study tracks diverse representations of the odd woman in fiction and autobiographical accounts in relation to the rise of feminism. It illuminates singleness in the context of the suffrage campaign, women's work, sexual inversion and birth control as well as assessing the impact of the First World War. It draws on advice literature, medical texts, feminist polemic and articles from the new women's magazines. Developing debates within queer theory about gender non-conformity, heteronormativity and relationships between women, this genealogy of the odd woman shows how new conceptualisations of female singleness and lesbianism troubled, and ultimately transformed, social norms.

Open Access (free)
Affective experiences of female same-sex intimacies in contemporary China
Yiran Wang

‘non-Western’ but globalising experiences, have become highly contested and are rapidly changing ( Ho et al ., 2018 ). These scenes have inspired a boom in empirical studies conducted in China that reflect on Euro-American theorisations of both heteronormative and ‘queer’ desires and practices (e.g. Engebretsen, 2014 ; Kam, 2013 ; Kong, 2011 ; Zheng, 2015 ). This chapter, developed from an anthropological

in Affective intimacies
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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

fabric (following Gramsci’s [1992] analysis of hegemony). In the case of romantic relationships, reiterated formulations in Hollywood movies which police the generation of a normative ‘us’ and an outsider ‘them’ are fundamentally heteronormative and hypermonogamous. HeteronormativityHeteronormativity’ is, broadly, the (mythical) assumption that all people are naturally and normally, exclusively and exhaustively, either men or women, and naturally and normally heterosexual. To truncate Judith Butler’s (1990) famous paradigm, heteronormativity can be conceived as a

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

chapter 7 we discussed how gendered power relations are both produced and reflected in Hollywood movies, and extended this critical analysis in chapter 8, where we considered how romantic comedies perpetuate myths of heteronormativity and hypermonogamy. Our task, in these chapters, has been to focus on those political myths pertinent to citizen-to-citizen rather than citizen–state relationalities. As will by now be clear, in most (non-feminist) scholarship, such intimate relationalities continue to be quarantined from the realm of the political, even though feminism has

in The cultural politics of contemporary Hollywood film
Kinneret Lahad

2 The linear life-course imperative One of the more prevalent clichés in Israeli culture is the consolation, “By your wedding day you will feel better.” This sentiment is often directed towards small children and is intended to be both comforting and hopeful at the same time. The sentiment not only assures children that with time they’ll feel better; it also constantly reminds them of their prospects for the future. In fact, it leaves no room for doubt regarding the heteronormative life-course trajectory, one that leads—eventually, but inevitably—to marriage

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

described by scholars such as George E. Haggerty in Queer Gothic ( 2006 ), Luce Irigaray in This Sex Which is Not One ( 1977 ) and Michel Foucault in The History of Sexuality (1976). Examining the intersections of sexuality and power within the representations of mother–son incest in the Gothic reveals the complexities of the radical destabilisations of gender and heteronormativity occurring

in Gothic incest