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Series: Irish Society
Author: Pat O’Connor

This book provides a definitive examination of higher education: exploring its nature and purpose, and locating it in the context of the state and the market. It presents new research on an elite group: senior managers in universities. They are relatively powerful in relation to their students and staff but relatively powerless in relation to wider neo-liberal forces. Written in a clear, student friendly, accessible style, and drawing on policy analysis and interviews with those at the top three levels of university management, it provides an in-depth analysis of the structures, cultures and practices at that level and locates these in a cross national context. Through the eyes of these senior managers, we are able to understand this gendered world, where four fifths of those in these positions are men, and to consider the implications of this in a world where diversity is crucial for innovation. Despite the managerialist rhetoric of accountability, we see structures where access to power is effectively through the Presidents’ ‘blessing,’ very much as in a medieval court. We see a culture that is less than comfortable with the presence of women, and which in its narratives, stereotypes and interactions exemplifies a rather 19th century view of women. Sites and agents of change are identified: both in the universities and in the wider international policy context. Essential for undergraduate and postgraduate students and their lecturers in education, management, sociology policy and gender studies, it will challenge them to critically reflect on management and on higher education.

Community engagement and lifelong learning
Author: Peter Mayo

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

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Globalisation and the HE market
Peter Mayo

 1 1 Introduction: globalisation and the HE market H igher education (HE) is believed to play a pivotal part in the process of globalisation and, as a consequence, it is being transformed, mainly within the context of a supranational union (the European Union, henceforth EU), which set itself the ambitious and unlikely target of becoming the most powerful and competitive ‘knowledge economy’ in the world by the year 2010 (EC, 2000). By higher education I mean all those institutions and organised forms of learning that occur at tertiary level, that is to say

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

 27 3 The EU’s HE discourse and the challenges of globalisation1 Introduction I n this chapter, I  shall focus on particular aspects of the discourse and its implications for HE settings as promoted by one of the supranational organisations (the EU), which, again in the words of Roger Dale, helps create a ‘globally structured agenda for education’ (Dale, 2000). The discursive contexts in which higher education policies are formulated include the Lisbon Objectives (EC, 2000; CEC, 2005) and the Bologna Process (Confederation of EU Rectors’ Conferences and

in Higher education in a globalising world
Pat O’Connor

8 Summary and conclusions Introduction This book is concerned with the changing context of higher education in Ireland and its implications as regards the gendered world of university senior management. Senior management in Irish universities typically includes manager-­academics and other professional managers, at presidential, vice-­ presidential, executive director and dean levels. In terms of their power within their organizations, and their level of remuneration, these are an elite group. Their decisions and priorities have implications for the

in Management and gender in higher education
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Instrumentality, scientization, degendering
Pat O’Connor

3 Policy priorities: instrumentality, scientization, degendering Introduction Since educational policy implicitly involves the definition of what constitutes valuable knowledge, as well as decisions about who will have access to that knowledge, and to what end, it is not surprising that the structure, current priorities and beliefs surrounding higher education reflect the balance of power between key stakeholders within a society at a particular moment in time. Higher educational systems reflect beliefs about the nature and purpose of higher education; about the

in Management and gender in higher education
Chris Duke, Michael Osborne, and Bruce Wilson

4 Two key partners – (2) higher education Introduction Chapter 3 explored two particular issues before considering the region as a partner: the scope and diversity of regions, and the impact of national and global change. Two essential similar questions arise in relation to the other main partner in this study, higher education: what is the scope of HE and how do national and global forces affect the situation? On this ‘other side’ – higher education institutions as against public sector governance – there is a swelling literature on the transformation of higher

in A new imperative
Shaun McDaid and Catherine McGlynn

‘chilling effect’ on free speech has not come to pass. Nevertheless, the policy should be abolished because it is ineffective to the point of being counter-productive, and is built on poor foundations in terms of evidence. The key threat to the dynamics of contemporary higher education comes not from language that the Prevent duty has the potential to suppress but from the lexicon of safeguarding and vulnerability that has been developed to ease counter-radicalisation into public spaces. Prevent, radicalisation and terrorism Prevent is a key plank of the UK’s counter

in The free speech wars
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Rosemary Deem

 119 Postscript Rosemary Deem P eter Mayo’s book raises many significant questions about the effects of different types of globalisation under capitalism, especially hegemonic globalisation and what Mayo terms ‘globalisation from below’ on contemporary universities but with attention to sometimes somewhat less examined in educational contexts forms of globalisation such as globalisation of human rights or globalisation of the war on terror. Globalisation is indeed often referred to in contemporary analyses of higher education (King et al., 2013; Nerad and

in Higher education in a globalising world
Peter Mayo

44 4 Extending the EU’s higher education discourse to the rest of the Mediterranean1 T his chapter builds on the previous one to show how the HE discourse is extending from Europe and specifically the EU to other regions of the world. This chapter focuses on the implications of this discourse specifically for university continuing education in the Euro-​Mediterranean, including Turkey and Morocco. The discussion I  carry forward draws on postcolonial theory. I  devote special importance to the concept of internationalisation that, as explained in the previous

in Higher education in a globalising world