Search results

Abstract only
Author: David Brauner

This is a study of the contemporary American novelist, Philip Roth. Reading alongside a number of his contemporaries and focusing particularly on his later fiction, it offers a view of Roth as an intellectually adventurous and stylistically brilliant writer who constantly reinvents himself in surprising ways. At the heart of this book are a number of readings of Roth's works both in terms of their relationships with each other and with fiction by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas Pynchon, Tim O'Brien, Bret Easton Ellis, Stanley Elkin, Howard Jacobson and Jonathan Safran Foer. The book identifies as a thread running through all of Roth's work the use of paradox, both as a rhetorical device and as an organising intellectual and ideological principle.

Morality, mortality and masculinity in Sabbath’s Theater
David Brauner

(1998), a novel by the Anglo-Jewish writer, Howard Jacobson. As Roth’s novel opens, Mickey Sabbath is an old man whose powers are on the wane. Having enjoyed a brief moment of notoriety as a young street artist in the sixties (when he is prosecuted for obscenity after complaints about the sexual content of one of his shows), Sabbath, now in his sixties, is a ‘forgotten puppeteer’, unable to practise his art because of the arthritis that has deformed his fingers (Roth 1995: 3). His two alternative careers – as an avant-garde theatre director and a teacher of puppetry

in Philip Roth
Abstract only
David Brauner

), Deception (1990) and Operation Shylock (1993), appropriates, complicates and finally parodies aspects of both realism and postmodernism, making connections between these texts and works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas Pynchon, Tim O’Brien and Bret Easton Ellis. In the third chapter, I discuss Roth’s treatment of morality, mortality and masculinity in what I consider to be his masterpiece, Sabbath’s Theater (1995), comparing it with a short story by Stanley Elkin and a novel by Howard Jacobson that share many of its themes. The fourth chapter develops work that I began in

in Philip Roth
Abstract only
On sitting down to read a letter from Freud
Nicholas Royle

that Wallace Stevens’s idea – the dear ‘I’ and dear ‘eye’ of the idea – that ‘Freud’s eye was the microscope of potency’, 2 must have been inspired by a photograph, perhaps this one), plus so much more, stockpiled anxiety in sleep, exploding in a missive directly from Freud. Like a tweet from Donald Trump. This was another ingredient of the Daily Residue: I had been reading an essay by Howard Jacobson about Trump’s tweets. He recalls Hugh Laurie’s tweeted query about Trump’s language, the tweet messages full of clichéd nouns and adjectives: ‘Will there be a separate

in Hélène Cixous
Bruce Woodcock

money was ‘too heavy’ and undermined the true appeal of the book as ‘a collection of terrific yarns’. 57 Laurie Clancy, too, admired Carey’s ‘glorious invention’ and found the writing ‘the finest and most sensuous’ that Carey had done, particularly by contrast with the ‘no more than functional’ prose of the earlier work. But he was disappointed overall by the way Carey failed to sustain his inventive energy as a result of the ‘desperate improvisation’ of the structure. 58 Howard Jacobson felt reading the novel was ‘not unlike spending a week in the company of the

in Peter Carey
Jürgen Habermas and the European left
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

which Jews were ethically obliged to have graduated with First Class Honours. But Israel, and those Jews who support Israel, are the overwhelming proof that they flunked their studies. … Thus are Jews doubly damned: to the Holocaust itself and to the moral wasteland of having found no humanising redemption in its horrors. (Howard Jacobson, When will Jews be Forgiven for the Holocaust? ) 2 After

in Antisemitism and the left
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

6 The return of the Jewish question and the double life of Israel So now the Jew is mistrusted not for what he is, but for the anti-Semitism of which he is the cause. And no Jew is more the cause of anti-Semitism than the Jew who speaks of anti-Semitism. (Howard Jacobson, When Will the Jews be Forgiven for the Holocaust? ) 1 Those who have always felt that Jews were

in Antisemitism and the left
Abstract only
Victoria Coldham-Fussell

If comedy, in all its changing shapes, has one overriding preoccupation, it is this: that we resemble beasts more closely than we resemble gods, and that we make great fools of ourselves the moment we forget it. Howard Jacobson, Seriously Funny Coupled with serious myths were comic and abusive ones; coupled with heroes were their parodies and doublets. Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World 1 ‘The Legend of Holiness’ teaches us that piety does not demand a dour face: the story begins with fasting and ends with feasting. Yet many of us are

in Comic Spenser
Nigel Mather

a more thoughtful, rational and enlightened view of the racial or cultural situations being discussed. The presence of these other non-racist (or in some cases less racist) characters meant that the programmes could not necessarily be considered as unambiguous propaganda for offensive or dubious ideological positions. Howard Jacobson in his study of comedy Seriously Funny: From the Ridiculous to the Sublime (1997

in Tears of laughter
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

and other hardships in Eastern Europe, also passed on the habits of fear and suspicion, as illustrated in Howard Jacobson’s comic novel of Anglo-Jewish life, Coming from Behind: It is pretty well established now that the Gestapo was never fully operational in Manchester in the 1950’s. But that did not prevent Sefton Goldberg’s early years from seeming every bit as fraught as Anne Frank’s. The faintest rustle in the porch used to be enough to throw the Goldberg household into scenes of such unforgettably terrifying confusion that even now, whenever his doorbell rang

in Austerity baby