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Anomalies and opportunities

This is the first book-length study of the humanities from Newman to Bologna in the Irish context. It focuses on unique characteristics of university policy in the National University that constrained humanities education. Ireland was a deeply religious country throughout the twentieth century but the colleges of its National University never established a theology or religion department. The official first language of Ireland is Irish but virtually all teaching in the Arts and Humanities is in English. The book examines the influence of such anomalies on humanities education and on Irish society in general. Has the humanities ethos of the Irish University departed radically from the educational ideals of John Henry Newman, its most illustrious ‘founder’? The book re-examines Newman’s vision for the university as well as responses to the 1908 Universities Act. It investigates how leading Irish educationalists and cultural theorists such as Padraig, Pearse, Denis Donoghue, J. J. Lee, Declan Kiberd and Richard Kearney nurtured an Irish humanities perspective in response to more established humanities traditions associated with F. R. Leavis, Edward Said, and Martha Nussbaum. The book employs a comparative approach in examining recent humanities movements such as Irish Studies and postcolonial studies. Humanities debates from other national contexts such as France, the US, and Asia are examined in light of influential work on the university by Samuel Weber, Immanuel Kant, Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Derrida. This book will appeal to the general public and to students and scholars of Irish education, history and cultural theory.

Michael O’Sullivan

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 09/13/2013, SPi 1 Introduction: defining the humanities The phrase the ‘crisis in the humanities’ has been appearing in American academic circles at the very least since the founding of the Irish state in 1922. In that year, art historian Josef Strzygowski lectured in Boston on ‘The Crisis in the Humanities as Exemplified in the History of Art’, the same year James Joyce published Ulysses and changed the literary landscape of the humanities in Ireland forever (Bell, 2010:69). The humanities is, of course, a recognized disciplinary

in The humanities and the Irish university
Michael O’Sullivan

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 09/13/2013, SPi 6 The transformation of the humanities in Ireland The Bologna Agreement and the ‘Europeanization’ of university education Implicit in what humanities learning represents is a willingness to overcome disparate national interests so as to embody a civic, ethical and cultural ethos that can speak across boundaries and uncover a common regard for enquiry. It speaks for a common good, or sensus communis, which, as Hans-Georg Gadamer explains, ‘founds community’ and gives the ‘human will its direction’ not through the

in The humanities and the Irish university
Michael O’Sullivan

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 09/13/2013, SPi 4 The emergence of an Irish humanities ethos Daniel Corkery, Sean Ó Tuama and a national literature in English Because the language question was such an important issue for education policy especially in the early years of the State, it is important to look at the work of some of the educationalists and university academics who worked extensively on Irish language literature. One of the first professors of English at University College Cork (UCC), Daniel Corkery, who later spent a great deal of time working on Irish

in The humanities and the Irish university
Michael O’Sullivan

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 09/13/2013, SPi 2 The humanities in the Irish context An ‘anomalous state’: unique problems for the humanities in Ireland Ireland was a deeply religious country throughout the twentieth century,1 but its National University never established, or provided public support for, a theology or religion department. The official first language of Ireland is Irish but virtually all teaching in the universities is done in English.2 These are two of the paradoxes that lay at the heart of the Irish university experience in the humanities in the

in The humanities and the Irish university
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal is a biannual, peer-reviewed publication which draws together the different strands of academic research on the dead body and the production of human remains en masse, whether in the context of mass violence, genocidal occurrences or environmental disasters. Inherently interdisciplinary, the journal publishes papers from a range of academic disciplines within the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Human Remains and Violence invites contributions from scholars working in a variety of fields and interdisciplinary research is especially welcome.

Open Access (free)
Herb Boyd

As this essay notes, James Baldwin, his words and metaphors, pervade public space at countless numbers of intersections. Lines from his plays, novels, and essays have always been an easy and handy reference for writers and artists seeking ways to ground their intentions with deeper meaning and magic. Even in a minority opinion on 22 June 2016 written by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, she cited several authors, including Baldwin, to underscore her point on the Court’s abrogation of the Fourth Amendment.

James Baldwin Review
Material and Theoretical Constrictions
Susan Martin-Márquez

In recent decades, scholars in a variety of humanities fields have thoroughly interrogated the ways in which established critical practices and theoretical frameworks have reproduced paradigms of coloniality. Yet cinema studies lags in this initiative. This article examines how presentist tendencies in particular have contributed to the ongoing Eurocentrism of academic work on film, by focusing on the acute challenges of film preservation and access, and the persistent sway of French theory.

Film Studies