Search results

Empire and the question of belonging
Author: Daniel Gorman

This is a book-length study of the ideological foundations of British imperialism in the early twentieth century. By focussing on the heretofore understudied concept of imperial citizenship, it illustrates how the political, cultural, and intellectual underpinnings of empire were constructed and challenged by forces in both Britain and the ‘Britains Overseas’, the settlement colonies of Canada, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Debates about imperial citizenship reveal how Britons conceived of the empire: was it an extension of the nation-state, a collection of separate and distinct communities, or a type of ‘world-state?’ These debates were also about the place of empire in British society, its importance to the national identity, and the degree to which imperial subjects were or were not seen as ‘fellow Britons’. This public discourse was at its most fervent from the Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902) to the early 1920s, when Britain emerged victorious, shocked and exhausted from the Great War. Drawing on the thinking of imperial activists, publicists, ideologues and travellers such as Lionel Curtis, John Buchan, Arnold White, Richard Jebb and Thomas Sedgwick, the book is a comparative history of how the idea of imperial citizenship took hold in early-twentieth-century Britain and how it helped foster the articulation of a broader British World. It also reveals how imperial citizenship as a form of imperial identity was challenged by voices in both Britain and the empire, and how it influenced later imperial developments.

Daniel Gorman

of each view saw in the idea and the institution of citizenship the means through which to pursue their goals. They sought to create an imperial citizenship, an idea which consisted of two interconnected parts: the desire to foster a greater sense of a shared imperial identity and the effort to codify this shared identity in law. This book examines how imperial ideologues used the language of imperial

in Imperial citizenship
Daniel Gorman

efforts ended in frustration: the broader public was not convinced of the necessity of a clearly defined imperial citizenship. Perhaps those ideologues asked too much of their putative fellow-imperial citizens. As one of Richard Jebb’s correspondents observed, ‘The average man has only a certain amount of public spirit and disinterested idealism in his composition and if he

in Imperial citizenship
Daniel Gorman

policy implementation. The task of giving practical shape to ideas of imperial citizenship was left to others. One such figure was the imperial journalist and traveller Richard Jebb. Like Curtis and Buchan, Jebb was primarily a theorist. However, Jebb had a clearer conception than they of the dominions’ emerging political importance. Unlike Curtis and Buchan, both of whom, despite the

in Imperial citizenship
Thomas Sedgwick and imperial emigration
Daniel Gorman

emigration within the Empire was a common one in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. It also illustrates the intertwined notions of imperialism and citizenship. Emigration was a case of imperial citizenship at work, or, as the social worker and emigration advocate Thomas Sedgwick put it, ‘Practical Imperialism.’ 2 As we have seen, the creation of a true imperial citizenship was

in Imperial citizenship
Abstract only
Imperial citizenship as a prelude to world government
Daniel Gorman

of public relations before that ‘calling’ had crystallized into a profession. 5 Curtis saw Empire as mankind’s best hope of fostering and preserving peace, a goal he believed could be pursued through the means of imperial citizenship. Though this position strikes modern ears as naive, and not a little pretentious, it was consistent with the normative view of politics and the

in Imperial citizenship
Daniel Gorman

an understanding of imperial citizenship in cosmopolitan and cooperative terms. While Buchan shared the organic impetus of Curtis’s thought, he did not share his peer’s desire to locate imperial citizenship within broader debates concerning imperial organization. Buchan was more interested in fostering the shared Britannic identity he believed must necessarily underpin any

in Imperial citizenship
Abstract only
Arnold White and the parochial view of imperial citizenship
Daniel Gorman

the nation’s health and efficiency – terms which frequently occur in White’s editorials – and to promote patriotism and loyalty applied equally to both England and the Empire. His notion of imperial citizenship was thus the same as his notion of domestic citizenship. He gave little thought to the richly varied nature of the imperium, which is to say that he advanced a parochial

in Imperial citizenship
Abstract only
Politics, Pageantry and Colonialism

Royal tours of the 1800s and early 1900s, and since, have created much documentation, perhaps the most obvious record contained in newspapers and magazines, newsreels and then radio and television broadcasts. Tours expressed and promoted royal and imperial authority, though in some instances they revealed resistance against expansionist designs. The royal visitor was the central actor in a tour, but was surrounded by an entourage of other people and a store of paraphernalia that played essential roles. This book examines how presentation is managed when ambassadors are sent in place of the royal personage. Sultan Alauddin of Aceh mounted a royal tour by proxy in which he was embodied - and concealed - in his gifts and in the humbler persons of his placeholders. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, provided a template for later royal tours in three ways. First, he pioneered a new relationship with the Royal Navy as a training institution for British princes. Second, his lengthy visits paved the way for similarly ambitious global tours. Alfred's tours cultivated a range of trusted support staff. Imperial citizenship and even Britishness were embraced by non- English and non- British subjects of the queen. One young prince who was present in Britain at some of the most glittering events was Thakur Sahib Bhagvatsinh, a Rajput who ruled Gondal. The book also discusses Kaiser Wilhelm II's tour, King Sisowath and Emperor Khai Dinh's tour to France, the Portuguese crown prince's tour of Africa, and tours during Smuts's Raj.

Author: Charles V. Reed

Royal Tourists, Colonial Subjects, and the Making of a British World, 1860-1911 examines the ritual space of nineteenth-century royal tours of empire and the diverse array of historical actors who participated in them. The book is a tale of royals who were ambivalent and bored partners in the project of empire; colonial administrators who used royal ceremonies to pursue a multiplicity of projects and interests or to imagine themselves as African chiefs or heirs to the Mughal emperors; local princes and chiefs who were bullied and bruised by the politics of the royal tour, even as some of them used the tour to symbolically appropriate or resist British cultural power; and settlers of European descent and people of colour in the empire who made claims on the rights and responsibilities of imperial citizenship and as co-owners of Britain’s global empire. Royal Tourists, Colonial Subjects, and the Making of a British World suggests that the diverse responses to the royal tours of the nineteenth century demonstrate how a multi-centred British-imperial culture was forged in the empire and was constantly made and remade, appropriated and contested. In this context, subjects of empire provincialized the British Isles, centring the colonies in their political and cultural constructions of empire, Britishness, citizenship, and loyalty.