An overview
Author: Harsh V. Pant

As India has risen economically and militarily in recent years, its political clout on the global stage has also seen a commensurate increase. From the peripheries of international affairs, India is now at the centre of major power politics. It is viewed as a major balancer in the Asia-Pacific, a major democracy that can be a major ally of the West in countering China even as India continues to challenge the West on a whole range of issues – non-proliferation, global trade and climate change. Indian foreign policy was driven by a sense of idealism since its independence in 1947. India viewed global norms as important as it kept a leash on the interests of great powers and gave New Delhi “strategic autonomy” to pursue its interests. But as India itself has emerged as a major global power, its foreign policy has moved towards greater “strategic realism.” This book is an overview of Indian foreign policy as it has evolved in recent times. The focus of the book is on the 21st century with historical context provided as appropriate. It will be an introductory book on Indian foreign policy and is not intended to be a detailed examination of any of its particular aspects. It examines India’s relationships with major powers, with its neighbours and other regions, as well as India’s stand on major global issues. The central argument of the book is that with a gradual accretion in its powers, India has become more aggressive in the pursuit of its interests, thereby emerging as an important player in the shaping of the global order in the new millennium.

Colliding ambitions with China
Harsh V. Pant

13 India in the Indian Ocean: colliding ambitions with China It emerged in December 2011 that China will be setting up its first military base abroad in the Seychelles to “seek supplies and recuperate” facilities for its navy. The Indian Ocean island nation defended its decision by suggesting that it had invited China to set up a military base to tackle piracy off its coast and Beijing played it down by underlining that it was standard global practice for naval fleets to resupply at the closest port of a nearby state during long-distance missions.1 But there

in Indian foreign policy
A. Martin Wainwright

Among non-governmental organisations whose major purpose was the reception of Indians in Britain, perhaps the most important were the Strangers’ Home for Asiatics, Africans, and South Sea Islanders, and the National Indian Association (NIA). The former provided temporary accommodation for sailors and destitutes respectively and is a focus of the

in ‘The better class’ of Indians
Social rank, imperial identity, and South Asians in Britain 1858–1914

This book focuses on the role of class in the encounter between South Asians and British institutions in the United Kingdom at the height of British imperialism. The leaders of Britain's cricketing institutions recognised the validity of ranks in an Indian social hierarchy which they attempted to translate into British equivalents. Achievement of Kumar Shri Ranjitsinjhi, one of the greatest cricketers of all time was truly an imperial one, combining the cultures and societies of India and Britain to propel him to a prominence that he would not otherwise have attained. The most important government institution to interact with Indians in Britain was the India Office. The National Indian Association was the most popular forum for interaction among Indians in Britain and Britons interested in India. The London City Mission and the Strangers' Home for Asiatics were the prominent inner-city missions to reach out to Indians in London. The book explores the extent to which British institutions treated Indians as British subjects, sharing a common legal and imperial identity with the inhabitants of the British Isles. It identifies patterns of compassion among Britain's elite when interacting with needy Indians in the United Kingdom, and establishes the central role of education in the civilising mission, particularly through scholarships to study in Britain. The book focuses on the ambiguous responses of British institutions to Indian students in the United Kingdom, ranging from accommodation of Indian culture to acquiescence in British bigotry.

Open Access (free)
Catherine Hall

For C. L. R. James West Indian identity was something to be celebrated, associated as it was for him, with the whole of the Caribbean, from Cuba and Haiti to Martinique, Trinidad and Jamaica. 1 Its distinctive character he saw as intimately linked to its particularly modern history, with the plantation at the centre of a global capitalist system linking slavery with

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Editor: Bill Schwarz

Caribbean migration to Britain brought many new things—new music, new foods, new styles. It brought new ways of thinking too. This book explores the intellectual ideas that the West Indians brought with them to Britain. It shows that, for more than a century, West Indians living in Britain developed a dazzling intellectual critique of the codes of Imperial Britain. Chapters discuss the influence of, amongst others, C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul. The contributors draw from many different disciplines to bring alive the thought and personalities of the figures they discuss, providing a picture of intellectual developments in Britain from which we can still learn much. The introduction argues that the recovery of this Caribbean past, on the home territory of Britain itself, reveals much about the prospects of multiracial Britain.

A. Martin Wainwright

presence of people of colour in the United Kingdom, it was British Christianity that provided the ethical context for the founders and directors of the organisations that catered to those whom commerce discarded. The result was an often contradictory attitude toward the place of Indians in British society. The full Bible verse from which the quote on the cover of the report comes is

in ‘The better class’ of Indians
Abstract only
An industry in decline
Brenda M. King

For centuries Indian artisans produced luxurious silk cloths for both the external and internal markets. Sadly, many have been lost over time, as the Indian climate and culture is not conducive to the preservation of fabric. The earliest silk textiles to have come to light so far date from around the fifteenth to the sixteenth centuries. 1 However, other surviving

in Silk and empire
Abstract only
Stephanie Barczewski

purchase his estate and settle in Britain. Finally, his experience reveals the risks of an Indian career, as he died before he could return home. The risks of India as a route to landed status Herbert’s example demonstrates that nabobs – men who made their fortunes either as employees of the East India Company or as ‘free traders’ (i.e., independent merchants) in India – were

in Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930
Abstract only
Harsh V. Pant

1 Introduction In November 2008, the financial capital of India, Mumbai, was struck by terrorists who the Indian (as well as the American and the British) intelligence later confirmed had received extensive training from the Pakistan-based group, Lashkar-e-Toiba, or Army of the Pure. Given the sophistication of planning and execution involved, it soon became apparent that this was a commando-style operation that possibly had the involvement of a state actor. As physical evidence mounted in terms of satellite phone calls, equipment and boats used for the attack

in Indian foreign policy