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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

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Peter Hutchings

first have appeared. Another way of establishing Fisher’s work (and particularly the horror films) as significantly British is through locating it in relation to an indigenous gothic tradition. Novels as diverse as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein , Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and Bram Stoker’s Dracula stand as the best-known testaments to an apparently innate

in Terence Fisher
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Glennis Byron

). In the next chapter, ‘Maori tales of the unexpected: The New Zealand television series Mataku as an Indigenous gothic form’, Ian Conrich reflects upon Mataku as an active engagement between non-Western and Western cultural practices. Beginning with a survey of the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions, Conrich then turns to forms of Indigenous gothic

in Globalgothic
The New Zealand television series Mataku as Indigenous gothic
Ian Conrich

Indigenous peoples are marginalised or subjugated, their culture and beliefs are rich sources for mining gothic tales of dark superstition and avenging supernatural forces. Indigenous gothic In contrast to these gothic appropriations, there are Indigenous forms of the gothic film. The Aborigine director Tracey Moffatt was the first Indigenous Australian filmmaker to make a feature

in Globalgothic
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Colette Balmain

-Western gothic forms as pale imitations of Western gothic. As we have seen, both Kwaidan and A Tale of Two Sisters problematise the idea of an indigenous gothic that is defined in terms of a poor copy of Western forms of gothic. Instead both films foreground the imbrication of the local in the global and the global in the local. The primacy of to-be-looked-at-ness as a manner by which former colonial nations

in Globalgothic