Search results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • "Intercurrence" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Edward Ashbee

1 Intercurrence and its implications This chapter sets the scene for later chapters by considering the relationship between the tiers established in the Introduction. As was noted, each of these tiers is described in one of the different literatures that survey the contemporary Right. The chapter introduces the concept of intercurrence within this context. The Introduction to the book surveyed the five literatures, structured around party, constituencies, regime, institutions, ideas and cultures, through which the Right in the UK and the US has been studied and

in The Right and the recession
Author: Edward Ashbee

The Right and the Recession considers the ways in which conservative activists, groupings, parties and interests in the US and Britain responded to the financial crisis and the “Great Recession” that followed in its wake. The book looks at the tensions and stresses between different ideas, interests and institutions and the ways in which they shaped the character of political outcomes. In Britain, these processes opened the way for leading Conservatives to redefine their commitment to fiscal retrenchment and austerity. Whereas public expenditure reductions had been portrayed as a necessary response to earlier “overspending” they were increasingly represented as a way of securing a permanently “leaner” state. The book assesses the character of this shift in thinking as well as the viability of these efforts to shrink the state and the parallel attempts in the US to cut federal government spending through mechanisms such as the budget sequester.

Edward Ashbee

7 Chafing, abrasion and the contemporary Right This chapter returns to the concept of ‘intercurrence’. It surveys the different components of the contemporary Right, the points at which they abrade, the character of the ‘chafing’ that take place and the political outcomes that emerge from all of this. The Introduction to the book surveyed the different literatures charting the history and development of the Right over recent decades and suggested that each of these literatures focuses on and captures important processes within a particular political level or

in The Right and the recession
Edward Ashbee

as levels or tiers abrade each other and interact. As APD theorists suggest in their studies of orders, it is these processes of ‘intercurrence’ that bring forth change.2 Second, The Right and the Recession seeks to assess the extent to which the change mechanisms enacted by the Cameron government in the UK might be expected to bring forth enduring change. Change is a subject about which much has been written in recent years, particularly within the framework of historical institutionalism. The point of departure for this literature has been the concept of path

in The Right and the recession