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Cinema has been an object of study for the social sciences for some time now. The relationship between law and cinema has been the subject of a certain number of reflections by jurists who work essentially within a national legal framework, and from the true genre that courtroom movies have become. One can point also to studies linking cinema and international relations. In short, the relationship between international law and cinema has never been the subject of a specific book. The objective of the present book is to show what image of international law and its norms is conveyed in films and series. Beyond a strictly legal analysis, the ambition is to take into account, in a broader perspective marked by interdisciplinarity, the relations between international law, cinema and ideology. The volume is aimed at a readership made of scholars, researchers as well as practitioners, in the field of international law, and related fields, all of whom will benefit from being introduced to a variety of perspectives on core international legal questions present in movies and TV series. Further, the volume can also be used with advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students studying international law, politics and international relations because it will provide the possibility of introducing students to a variety of perspectives on key issues in international law present in movies and TV series.

This collection of chapters provides the most comprehensive study of the theory and practice on the contribution of international organisations and non-State actors to the formation of customary international law. It offers new practical and theoretical perspectives on one of the most complex questions about the making of international law, namely the possibility that actors other than states contribute to the making of customary international law. Notwithstanding the completion by the International Law Commission of its work on the identification of customary international law, the making of customary international law remains riddled with acute practical and theoretical controversies which have been left unresolved and which continue to be intensively debated in both practice and scholarship. Making extensively reference to the case-law of international law courts and tribunals as well as the practice of treaty-monitoring bodies while also engaging with the most recent scholarly work on customary international law, this new volume provides innovative tools and guidance to legal scholars, researchers in law, law students, lecturers in law, practitioners, legal advisers, judges, arbitrators, and counsels as well as tools to address contemporary questions of international law-making.

Determining the methodology
Olivier Corten and François Dubuisson

ceremoniously, and says in a calm but firm voice: ‘Since you refuse to abide by the laws of the civilised world, we must consider ourselves absolved from our duty to obey you. My officers will not do manual labour.’ ‘We shall see’ replies Colonel Saito. The renowned international humanitarian law specialist Eric David explains that this scene, which he saw when he was an adolescent, remained engraved in his memory, particularly as an expression of the Japanese official’s contempt for the law. 2 This anecdote has inspired a section dedicated to ‘International Law and

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Michael Byers

Introduction Most of humanity shares two searing memories: the collapse of the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001; and a hooded man standing on a box with wires dangling from his outstretched hands. These images capture the painful truth that both sides in the so-called ‘war on terror’ have violated fundamental rules. But while non-state actors can violate international law, only states are able to change the law, making their breaches of greater potential consequence. In this chapter, I consider how the recent actions of the United States

in ‘War on terror’
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention From the 1860s onwards, international law became an academic discipline in its own right in Europe and the Americas, taught separately from philosophy, natural law or civil law, and came to be written by professional academics or theoretically inclined diplomats. 1 Until then what existed was the droit public de l’Europe or ‘external public law’. Britain in particular had to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Veronika Bílková

In 2018, the United Nations International Law Commission adopted, on second reading, a set of Conclusions on Identification of Customary International Law . 1 The document, now submitted to the United Nations General Assembly, contains sixteen conclusions relating to various aspects of the formation and identification of customary international law. The basic approach that the document embraces is a traditional one. A rule of customary international law emerges when there is ‘a general practice that is accepted as law ( opinio juris )’ . 2 The practice is

in International organisations, non-State actors, and the formation of customary international law
Mirror or looking-glass?
Luíza Leão Soares Pereira

This chapter addresses one specific aspect of the International Law Commission’s work on the identification of customary international law: how it sees its own output in relation to custom. While in the latest Conclusions and Commentary on the Identification of Customary International Law (hereafter ‘the Conclusions’) it dedicates specific sections to ‘teachings of publicists’ and judgments, the Commission chose not to dedicate a discrete sub-heading to its own work, instead mentioning it in passing in the commentary preceding the ‘Significance of certain

in International organisations, non-State actors, and the formation of customary international law
Law and conflicts over water in the Krishna River Basin
Radha D’Souza

underwent radical transformation. Indeed, it is possible to argue that the schisms internalized in the legal systems enabled new forms of imperial relations to emerge after the old forms of political colonialism ended. This paper attempts to locate the role of law within debates on the imperialist nature of world political economy after international law, through the UN Charter

in Law, history, colonialism
Nicolas Kang- Riou

societal structures’. 4 Thus, it is difficult to say that science fiction cinema can produce a ‘credible account’ of known international law due to the radically transformed nature of the ‘international’ society. Then is writing as legal scholars on international law in science fiction cinema an impossibility? Did the editors of this book fail to notice that science fiction movies do not deal with any of our current world international legal institutions or rules? Or are we in an alternate universe where publishers give free rein to authors to write without following

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Michael Wood

The present volume is a timely addition to the vast (and still growing) literature on customary international law. In 2018 the United Nations International Law Commission adopted, on second and final reading, a set of sixteen conclusions (with commentaries) on identification of customary international law, thus bringing to completion a six-year study of the topic. 1 Throughout that time, the question whether, and if so how, the practice of international (intergovernmental) organizations may contribute to the formation and identification of customary

in International organisations, non-State actors, and the formation of customary international law