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Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

Operational Approach and Strategy Warrap and Northern Bar el Ghazal States, South Sudan (Patrick Andrey). ACF International: Paris . AET . ( 2014 ), Primary Education Programme: Africa Educational Trust Jigsaw Consult . APPGSS . ( 2015 ), Bridging the Gaps: Lessons from International Engagement with South Sudan 2011–2014 . All-Party Parliamentary Group for Sudan and South Sudan January 2015 . Baker , J. , Thiele , A. and Saint-Mleux , C. ( 2017 ), Disasters Emergency Committee – East African Response Review: South Sudan . Results

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

Abstract only
Anna Bocking-Welch

common symbols of a decade of change. As a result, we have little difficulty in imagining youth or political activists as international actors – as active participants in a globalising world. Yet, as this book shows, it was not just the young and politically active who looked out onto the changing world. The geopolitical changes of the 1960s also opened up new opportunities and created new expectations for international engagement among middle-class, middle-aged members of society with little interest in protest. For many participants in middle-class associational life

in British civic society at the end of empire
Abstract only
Anna Bocking-Welch

with international experiences could act as instigators, using the networks of traditional associational life to engage the wider population in their interests. By studying the Royal Commonwealth Society (RCS), Women's Institutes (WIs), Rotary Clubs, and Christian Aid and Freedom from Hunger Campaign (FFHC) committees across the country, this book has shown that in the 1960s globalisation and decolonisation opened up new opportunities for international engagement not just for the young, or for those involved in politically engaged new social movements, but also for

in British civic society at the end of empire
Anna Bocking-Welch

Americanisation of British practices of international engagement? The rhetoric of business-informed internationalism is easily apparent in Rotary magazine, which frequently characterised friendships as productive relationships. Speaking at RIBI's annual conference in 1961, for example, Lord Kilmuir, the Lord High Chancellor, discussed the value of personal meetings with foreigners. ‘In a life which has contained much international negotiation,’ he concluded, ‘I rate a good personal contact at 20 per cent of the way to success. If they do not exist, you may never get in sight

in British civic society at the end of empire
Anna Bocking-Welch

life. Many others were influenced directly by decolonisation and informed a set of competing visions of the declining empire, wider world, and Britain's place within it. The choices that the WI and Rotary made about how to utilise available forms of international knowledge tell us about the different kinds of relationship they imagined with the outside world. What expectations did these associations have for their members’ international engagement? What were members expected to know in order to fulfil their responsibility as internationally engaged citizens? And to

in British civic society at the end of empire
Anna Bocking-Welch

’. 144 Though often expressed differently, similar principles of continuity and preservation inform many of the international engagement activities discussed in the rest of this book. Notes 1 A. L. Adu, ‘The reality and potential capacity of the Commonwealth’, Commonwealth Journal , 12 (February 1969), 12. 2

in British civic society at the end of empire
Interests, influences and instability
Editors: Robert Mason and Simon Mabon

This volume explores the complex nature of interactions between states in the Persian Gulf and their counterparts in the Horn of Africa. Focusing on the nature of interregional connections between the Gulf and the Horn; it explores the multifaceted nature of relations between two increasingly important subregions. Bringing together scholars focusing on both regions; the book offers a rigorous analysis of the changing nature of relations between the different subregions and also the complexity of competition within each subregion. Considering strategic competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran; along with international engagement such as joint anti-piracy operations; counterterrorism cooperation; shipping routes; and economic development; the volume provides valuable insight into the strategic importance of these interactions.

Drawing on a range of subject expertise and field research across case study countries; the volume adds to the sparse literature on the regional and international politics of the Horn of Africa and Red Sea; gleaning specific insights through contemporary reflections across the book.

Decolonisation, Globalisation, and International Responsibility

This book is about the impact of decolonisation on British society in the 1960s. It moves away from the traditional focus on cultural, media, and governmental archives to analyse public agency and civic forms of engagement with the declining empire. Through a close examination of middle-class associational life it broadens our understanding of who had a stake in decolonisation while also revealing the optimism and enthusiasm with which members of the British public developed visions for a post-imperial global role. By studying a wide range of associational organisations this book shows that globalisation and decolonisation opened up new opportunities for international engagement for middle-aged members of middle-class society. In the 1960s for many participants in associational life it became a civic duty to engage, understand, and intervene to help the shrinking world in which they lived. This book uncovers how associations and organisations acted on this sense of duty, developing projects that promoted friendship and hospitality as the foundations of world peace, visions for secular and religious forms of humanitarianism that encouraged relationships of both sympathy and solidarity with those in the global South, and plans to increase international understanding through educative activities. This book will be useful to scholars of modern British history, particularly those with interests in empire, internationalism, and civil society. The book is also designed to be accessible to undergraduates studying these areas.

Place, space and discourse
Editors: Christine Agius and Dean Keep

Identity is often regarded as something that is possessed by individuals, states, and other agents. In this edited collection, identity is explored across a range of approaches and under-explored case studies with a view to making visible its fractured, contingent, and dynamic features. The book brings together themes of belonging and exclusion, identity formation and fragmentation. It also examines how identity functions in discourse, and the effects it produces, both materially and in ideational terms. Taking in case studies from Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, the various chapters interrogate identity through formal governing mechanisms, popular culture and place. These studies demonstrate the complex and fluid nature of identity and identity practices, as well as implications for theorising identity.