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Cinema has been an object of study for the social sciences for some time now. The relationship between law and cinema has been the subject of a certain number of reflections by jurists who work essentially within a national legal framework, and from the true genre that courtroom movies have become. One can point also to studies linking cinema and international relations. In short, the relationship between international law and cinema has never been the subject of a specific book. The objective of the present book is to show what image of international law and its norms is conveyed in films and series. Beyond a strictly legal analysis, the ambition is to take into account, in a broader perspective marked by interdisciplinarity, the relations between international law, cinema and ideology. The volume is aimed at a readership made of scholars, researchers as well as practitioners, in the field of international law, and related fields, all of whom will benefit from being introduced to a variety of perspectives on core international legal questions present in movies and TV series. Further, the volume can also be used with advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students studying international law, politics and international relations because it will provide the possibility of introducing students to a variety of perspectives on key issues in international law present in movies and TV series.

A feminist analysis, with a new introduction

Representing the first book-length treatment of the application of feminist theories of international law, The boundaries of international law argues that the absence of women in the development of international law has produced a narrow and inadequate jurisprudence that has legitimated the unequal position of women worldwide rather than confronted it.

With a new introduction that reflects on the profound changes in international law since the book’s first publication in 2000, this volume is essential reading for scholars, practitioners and students alike.

Hilary Charlesworth
and
Christine Chinkin

Introduction This chapter and the next examine various modes of international law- making to investigate the interests and perspectives they support. Here, we describe the law with respect to customary international law, general principles of law and subsidiary sources of law. Chapter 4 looks more specifically at the law of treaties. We deal with the traditional

in The boundaries of international law
Hilary Charlesworth
and
Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book uses feminist theories to sustain its claim that the absence of women in international law has distorted the discipline’s boundaries. The aim of this chapter is to introduce these theories and to consider their value in understanding international law. As a background to this task, we first discuss the theories that underpin traditional international

in The boundaries of international law
Author:

"It is the contention of this book that there was a notion of international law in the medieval period, and more specifically in the period 700 to 1200. It examines and analyses the ways and the extent to which such as system of rules was known and followed in the Middle Ages by exploring treaties as the main source of international law, and by following a known framework of evidencing it: that it was practised on a daily basis; that there was a reliance upon justification of action; that the majority of international legal rules were consistently obeyed; and finally, that it had the function to resolve disputed questions of fact and law.

This monograph further considers problems such as enforcement, deterrence, authority, and jurisdiction, considering carefully how they can be observed in the medieval evidence, and challenging traditional ideas over their role and function in the history of international law. This monograph then, attempts to make a leap forward in thinking about how rulers, communities, and political entities conducted diplomacy and regulated their interactions with each other in a period before fully fledged nation states.

Determining the methodology
Olivier Corten
and
François Dubuisson

ceremoniously, and says in a calm but firm voice: ‘Since you refuse to abide by the laws of the civilised world, we must consider ourselves absolved from our duty to obey you. My officers will not do manual labour.’ ‘We shall see’ replies Colonel Saito. The renowned international humanitarian law specialist Eric David explains that this scene, which he saw when he was an adolescent, remained engraved in his memory, particularly as an expression of the Japanese official’s contempt for the law. 2 This anecdote has inspired a section dedicated to ‘International Law and

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Treaties

The starting point for any discussion of the sources of international law is usually Art. 38(1) of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, which describes the three types of material that should be considered international law. Treaties are the first listed, followed by international custom (or legal practice) and general principles of law (e.g., canon or Roman law

in International law in Europe, 700–1200
Michael Byers

Introduction Most of humanity shares two searing memories: the collapse of the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001; and a hooded man standing on a box with wires dangling from his outstretched hands. These images capture the painful truth that both sides in the so-called ‘war on terror’ have violated fundamental rules. But while non-state actors can violate international law, only states are able to change the law, making their breaches of greater potential consequence. In this chapter, I consider how the recent actions of the United States

in ‘War on terror’
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

Advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention From the 1860s onwards, international law became an academic discipline in its own right in Europe and the Americas, taught separately from philosophy, natural law or civil law, and came to be written by professional academics or theoretically inclined diplomats. 1 Until then what existed was the droit public de l’Europe or ‘external public law’. Britain in particular had to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Hilary Charlesworth
and
Christine Chinkin

Introduction This book has argued that sex and gender shape international law. It has questioned the universality and objectivity of international law because of the exclusion of women from its substance, methodologies and processes. It has examined the assumptions of the international legal order that inculcate particular conceptions of gender and reinforce in turn ideas

in The boundaries of international law