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Journalism in twentieth-century Ireland
Author: Mark O’Brien

This book examines the history of journalists and journalism in twentieth century Ireland. While many media institutions have been subjected to historical scrutiny, the professional and organisational development of journalists, the changing practices of journalism, and the contribution of journalists and journalism to the evolution of modern Ireland have not. This book rectifies this deficit by mapping the development of journalism in Ireland from the late 1880s to today. Beginning with the premise that the position of journalists and the power of journalism are products of their time and are shaped by ever-shifting political, economic, technological, and cultural forces it examines the background and values of those who worked as journalists, how they viewed and understood their role over the decades, how they organised and what they stood for as a professional body, how the prevailing political and social atmosphere facilitated or constrained their work, and, crucially, how their work impacted on social change and contributed to the development of modern Ireland. Placing the experiences of journalists and the practice of journalism at the heart of its analysis it examines, for the first time, the work of journalists within the ever-changing context of Irish society. Based on strong primary research – including the previously un-consulted journals and records produced by the many journalistic representative organisations that came and went over the decades – and written in an accessible and engaging style, this book will appeal to anyone interested in journalism, history, the media, and the development of Ireland as a modern nation.

Abstract only
Mark O’Brien

critical element of the new journalism  –​investigative journalism  –​finally began to be incorporated into Irish journalism. As Brian Trench has noted, it was during the 1970s that the notion of journalism giving offence to those in power –​or rather those in power taking offence at the work of journalists –​became commonplace. Up to the late 1960s, it seemed there was a conscious effort on the part of journalists to avoid giving offence, however inadvertent. But in the 1970s there was a marked increase in people taking offence at the work of journalists. This arose not

in The Fourth Estate
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Bryan Fanning

reportage and were committed to investigative journalism many were explicitly partisan in the doctrines and ideologies they championed. Only one, The Bell, edited by Sean O’Faoláin, overlaps with the choices in my own survey of Irish journals, The Quest for Modern Ireland: The Battle of Ideas 1912–1986.2 My focus was upon Irish journals which were influential or representative of prominent ideological perspectives, where academics and intellectuals set out their stalls. The focus here is on specialist periodicals and magazines. These, according to O’Brien and Larkin

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Poulson and Smith
Peter Jones

investigative journalism championed by Harold Evans at The Sunday Times brought a cutting edge to the Sunday broadsheets too. Evans had also worked in the north of England for the Manchester Evening News as a junior reporter and later for The Northern Echo as editor. So he was well versed in the politics of the north of England. The Poulson case is especially important because it raised the question of press freedom when publishing legal proceedings without risking contempt. 05_Peter_Ch-4.indd 77 7/29/2013 6:25:15 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/29/2013, SPi 78 from

in From virtue to venality
Imogen Richards

This chapter commences an account of Al Qaeda’s political-economic propaganda. The discussion and analysis are influenced by interpretations of neo-jihadism articulated in the work of the activist-scholars Iain Boal, T. J. Clark, Joseph Matthews, and Michael Watts, as well as insights from investigative journalism in the Global War on Terror. The analysis in this chapter foregrounds Islamist ideologues that influenced Al Qaeda at its 1988 inception, before reflecting on how the organisation’s political-economic propaganda engaged with dominant anti-capitalist and anti-US perspectives prior to and following 11 September 2001, and after the 2008 Global Financial Crisis. The investigation addresses the discourse of prominent figures who influenced Al Qaeda in history and who spoke on behalf of the organisation, including Osama Bin Laden, Abdullah Azzam, Aymenn al-Zawahiri, and Adam Gadahn. Drawing on Bourdieusian theory, it explores how Al Qaeda leaders appeal to social, cultural, and symbolic capital through their propaganda, while their collective expression of an anti-capitalist ‘habitus’ corresponds to a changing ‘field’ of anti-capitalism that developed over time.

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Abstract only
Peter Jones

Blackpool. Whether corruption revived in the 1960s and 1970s to create a corrupt moment might suggest a change in the ethical environment, but opinion polls imply a healthy suspicion of politicians and their motives. The role of the press and investigative journalism, television and radio brought the issue of corruption into living rooms throughout the land, and so new technologies and forms of media communication – the documentary and the radio phone-in, for example – created new possibilities of participation, sensitising public consciousness to the issue of corruption

in From virtue to venality
Abstract only
Mark O’Brien

church to the new journalism of the late nineteenth century –​one of horror and puritanism –​set the tone for much that followed. This reaction retarded the development of journalism in the first half of the twentieth century by curtailing and delaying the advent of social affairs and investigative journalism until the 1960s and 1970s. As newsvendors came under pressure not to sell publications that carried offending material, proprietors, editors, and journalists took note. ‘Indelicate’ topics –​to use the phrase from the time –​were not to be reported on. Similarly

in The Fourth Estate
On Skynet, self-healing swarms and Slaughterbots
Jutta Weber

Investigative Journalism 11 and the academic International Committee for Robot Arms Control 12 have been trying to draw attention to massive violations of human rights by drones, with little effect so far. According to Russell’s understanding, one of the great obstacles to a realistic debate about the potentials of contemporary AI-based technologies seems to be the traditional socio-technical imaginaries of AI, shaped by films such as the Terminator series, I, Robot and Ex Machina . Thanks to the influence of Hollywood science fiction blockbusters, autonomous AI is

in Drone imaginaries
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Nadia Valman

with affective, narrative-driven investigative journalism, Potter published ‘Pages from a Work-Girl’s Diary’ in the Nineteenth Century in 1888, but by 1889 she was once again dissatisfied: The last month or so I have been haunted by a longing to create characters and to move them to and fro among fictitious circumstances – to put the matter plainly, by the vulgar wish to write a novel! … I have in my mind some more dramatic representation of facts than can be given in statistical tables and in the letterpress that explains these – some way of bringing home to the

in Margaret Harkness