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Identity is contingent and dynamic, constituting and reconstituting subjects with political effects. This book explores the implications of Protestant and 'British' incursions for the development of Irish Catholic identity as preserved in Irish language texts from the early modern period until the end of Stuart pretensions. Questions of citizenship, belonging, migration, conflict, security, peace and subjectivity are examined through social construction, post-colonialism, and gendered lenses from an interdisciplinary perspective. The book explains the issue of cultural Catholicism in the later middle ages, by way of devotional cults and practices. It examines Catholic unionism vis-a-vis Victorian politics, military and imperial service, the crown, and the position of the Catholic Church with relation to the structures of the state in Ireland. In particular the North American experience and especially the importance of the USA for consolidating a particular interpretation of Irish Catholic nationalist identity, is explored. Children studied in English Catholic public schools like Stonyhurst and Downside where the establishment Irish Catholics and rising mercantile classes sought to have the characteristics of the Catholic gentleman instilled in their progeny. The book sets out to detect the voices of those Catholic women who managed to make themselves heard by a wider audience than family and friends in Ireland in the years between the Act of Union of 1800 and independence/partition. It considers what devotional interests both Gaelic Irish and Anglo-Norman actually shared in common as part of a wider late medieval Catholic culture.

A brief survey
Éamonn Ó Ciardha

8 Irish-language sources for Irish Catholic identity since the early modern period: a brief survey Éamonn Ó Ciardha The five decades after the ‘Flight of the Earls’ (1607) witnessed a marked decline in the fortunes of the professional learned classes of poets, scribes, brehons, genealogists and chroniclers. Although the wholesale destruction of manuscripts and the carelessness of subsequent generations have deprived us of much of their œuvre, nearly six thousand manuscripts (many of which remain unedited and untranslated) have survived the ravages of time to

in Irish Catholic identities
Abstract only
Oliver P. Rafferty

Ireland, are a sense of ‘Irishness’ often conceived in broad terms and subject to fluctuating understanding of what constitutes such an identity, and adherence to the Catholic faith. The influence, authority and role of the Catholic Church in shaping Irish Catholic consciousness are, therefore, paramount as a template for understanding Ireland and the Irish historically. Among the issues raised is the seminal question: does it make sense to think in terms of a clear and distinct identity over time, and is this sense of identity linked 2 Irish Catholic identities

in Irish Catholic identities
Fergal Casey

radicalism arguably constitutes a ‘greening’ – the application to England of insights gleaned from his engagement with Ireland. His pamphlet Ireland: A Letter to Earl Grey (1868) adopted politically radical ideas in response to Irish conditions, and this essay will offer a preliminary sketch of how in the service of a new Irish Catholic identity his economics radicalised, beginning with the pamphlet The Dignity and Rights of Labour (1874). His activism in the 1880s such as his mediation in the dock strike and his letters to The Times went side by side with growing

in Irish Catholic identities
Louise Fuller

expressions of Catholic and Irish identity state were also very concerned to further the aim of restoring the Irish language and culture to its rightful position and they did this chiefly by means of the education system. Church and political interests had the same vision of the purity and distinctiveness of Irish culture and were equally concerned to restore, maintain and protect what was seen as the unique Irish Catholic identity from what were perceived to be alien influences emanating from abroad. Independence made it possible to copper-fasten Catholic identity and

in Irish Catholic identities
Niall Coll

economic 366 Contemporary expressions of Catholic and Irish identity downturn since the Great Famine. Politicians, bankers, developers and financiers are under fire. In what way then is it credible to speak about Irish Catholic identity today? A sharp and amusing perspective on the current confusions and challenges that Irish Catholics and indeed all Irish people face in trying to locate a distinct identity is summed up in Tom Bartlett’s observation that: By 2010 Irish distinctiveness had apparently vanished, and so too had Irish exceptionalism. Where once just about

in Irish Catholic identities
David Finnegan

face of Catholic pleas for assurance of their status within Ireland, Ceítinn’s history implicitly advocated a ‘conditional royalism’. Irish political Catholicism, 1530s to 1660 85 Most of the clerical corps (and their flock) shared this ‘conditional’ allegiance to the crown. They accepted the pope’s role as their spiritual leader and their pursuit of toleration then was entirely secondary to their loyalty to Roman orthodoxy. The centrality of this tenet to Irish Catholic identity is clear from the community’s refusal to swear an oath of allegiance until Charles

in Irish Catholic identities
Eucharistic controversy and the English origins of Irish Catholic identity, 1550–51
James Murray

5 The ‘absenting of the bishop of Armagh’: eucharistic controversy and the English origins of Irish Catholic identity, 1550–51 James Murray In the summer of 1551, before 28 July, Archbishop George Dowdall of Armagh made a fateful decision. After eight years of service as the crown’s appointee to Ireland’s primatial see, the archbishop elected to relinquish his office and to flee the kingdom. The ‘absenting of the bishop of Armagh’ – as Lord Deputy Croft euphemistically described Dowdall’s flight – was preceded, and immediately precipitated, by a meeting between

in Irish Catholic identities
Oliver P. Rafferty

late 1960s of a new and highly articulate political leadership in Northern Catholicism, the scene was set for the potential fragmentation of northern Catholic identity, where the position and role of bishops and priests did not command immediate deference. In such circumstances ecclesiastical leaders struggled to impose their views of what constituted Northern Irish Catholic identity. Large sections of the Catholic population were at loggerheads with the hierarchy over the analysis of the extent and causes of the problems facing the Catholic community in the early

in Irish Catholic identities
Bernhard Maier

In this chapter, the author provides a historic overview of Christian Ireland in the early middle ages. He then evokes some salient features of early Irish Christianity, both in its material and in its spiritual aspects. The author examines both the universal Catholic mould and the distinctively Gaelic stamp of early Irish Christianity. He concludes by looking at some of the ways in which it has dealt with the pre-Christian past and contributed to shaping the future. The interaction of Gaelic and Catholic in the early middle ages has to be seen in the context of a dynamic history following the Celticisation of Ireland and the Romanisation of western Britain. Historically, Irish penitentials were to be of special significance, as they were of crucial importance for the development of the practice of penance in the middle ages.

in Irish Catholic identities