Women, politics and the private sphere
Heather Laird

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/26/2013, SPi 8 Heather Laird: Decentring the Irish Land War: women, politics and the private sphere The dominant Irish historical narrative, at its most basic, sees the history of Ireland since the beginning of the nineteenth century as a series of revolts and risings which posed a direct challenge to the colonial state with lulls in between. This narrative is underpinned by a narrow notion of the political, with events and actions only considered historically significant if they affect the structures of organized politics relating

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Anne Kane

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/26/2013, SPi 9 Anne Kane: The transcendent role of Catholic discourse in the Irish Land War1 Central to Paul Bew’s seminal study of the Irish Land War is explaining the challenge that confronted Charles Parnell and the Irish National Land League (INLL): how to resolve the conflict of interests between the diverse social and political groups that constituted the land movement – different classes of tenant farmers, Home Rulers, Fenians and radicals, Irish Americans and the Irish Catholic Church (ICC).2 The challenge that confronted

in Land questions in modern Ireland

The question of land in Ireland has long been at the heart of political, social and cultural debates. In eleven essays a group of authors including some of the most influential historians and social scientists of modern Ireland, and up-and-coming scholars, explore Ireland's land questions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which presents the current state of our understanding of the issue of land in Ireland in two survey essays that cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book's second section presents a series of reflections in which historians and social scientists look back on how they have approached the topic of land in Ireland in their earlier writings. A third section presents some innovative new research on various aspects of the Irish land question.

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The Land League alliances
Samuel Clark

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/01/2013, SPi 5 Samuel Clark: Strange bedfellows? The Land League alliances In this essay, I shall (1) briefly review the principal arguments of Social Origins of the Irish Land War, along with several earlier articles I published on rural unrest in Ireland, (2) reassess and elaborate on these arguments in the light of more recent literature, (3) acknowledge some of the subjects that I did not cover and (4) discuss one of these uncovered subjects in a little detail. Intellectual context of Social Origins First, however, let me

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Fergus Campbell

; my own work on ‘ordinary’ agrarian radicals in the west of Ireland during the revolutionary era; Anne Kane, who was adopting a cultural history approach to her study of the Irish Land War of 1879–81; and Heather Laird, who was using literary sources to reflect on ideas of law and order in rural Ireland between 1879 and 1920, among others. A decision was made not only to invite established historians to speak but to also invite some of these new historians to speak at the conference. This younger (or still – at least then – ‘youngish’) generation of historians had

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Gerard Moran

, Popular Politics in Ireland, p. 202. See Moran, ‘Laying the Seeds for Agrarian Agitation’, p. 76; Rules of the Ballinasloe Tenants’ Defence Association (NLI, 47, 373/3, Sweetman papers). Connaught Telegraph, 24 June 1876. Connaught Telegraph, 9 November 1878; Jordan, Land and Popular Politics in Ireland, p. 212. Special Commission, x, vol. 1, p. 339. Moody, Davitt and Irish Revolution, p. 210. S. Clark, The Social Origins of the Irish Land War (Princeton, 1979), p. 257. Freeman’s Journal, 24 June 1876. 7/26/2013 3:25:46 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/26/2013, SPi

in Land questions in modern Ireland
The politics of marriage in late Mulholland
James H. Murphy

legislative concessions by the government. Within a decade the way was open for Irish tenants to become owners of their farms on the strength of government loans to buy out the landlords. The land struggle of the 1880s was accompanied by various forms of active and passive resistance. Boycotting, attacks on landlords and their agents, intimidation, and cattle maiming were tactics employed by some that caused outrage in Britain. Thus the Irish Land War generated 34 The politics of marriage in late Mulholland its own fictional genre, mostly for a British market, with novels

in Irish women’s writing, 1878–1922
Irish farmers’ parties and land redistribution in the twentieth century
Tony Varley

meetings, in order to avoid alienating the large-farm element’ (‘The Importance of Agrarian Classes: Agrarian Class Structure and Collective Action in Nineteenth-Century Ireland’, in P. J. Drudy (ed.), Ireland: Land, Politics and People (Cambridge, 1982), p. 36). Active in leadership roles in the Land War agitation, large farmers had sufficient veto power ‘... to prevent it from turning in directions contrary to their interests’ (S. Clark, Social Origins of the Irish Land War (Princeton, 1979), p. 301). 15_Fergus_Ch-11.indd 257 8/1/2013 9:16:20 PM MUP FINAL PROOF

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh

Vanishing Irish: Households, Migration, and the Rural Economy in Ireland, 1850–1914 (Princeton and London, 1997); M. Turner, After the Famine: Irish Agriculture 1850–1914 (Cambridge, 1996); C. Ó Gráda, A New Economic History 1780–1939 (Oxford, 1994), pp. 213–73. 27 P. Bew, Land and the National Question in Ireland, 1858–82 (Dublin, 1978); S. Clark, Social Origins of the Irish Land War (Princeton, 1979); T. W. Moody, Davitt and Irish Revolution, 1846–82 (Oxford, 1981). 28 These were fair rent, freedom of sale and fixity of tenure. 29 An excellent summary of Irish Land

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Abstract only
Donnacha Seán Lucey

extensively analysed and will not be repeated here; see Daly, The Buffer State; E. Marnane, Cork County Council: The First Hundred Years, 1899–1999 (Cork: Cork County Council, 1999), pp. 127–69. 20 D. S. Lucey with V. Crossman, ‘“One huge abuse”: the Cork Board of Guardians and the expansion of outdoor relief in post-Famine Ireland’, English Historical Review, 127:523 (2011), 1408–29; D. S. Lucey, ‘Power, politics and poor relief during the Irish Land War, 1879–82’, Irish Historical Studies, 37:148 (2011), 548–98. 21 L. Earner-Byrne, Mother and Child: Maternity and Child

in The end of the Irish Poor Law?