Search results

Theories, concepts and new perspectives

Bringing together leading authorities on Irish women and migration, this book offers a significant reassessment of the place of women in the Irish diaspora. It demonstrates the important role played by women in the construction of Irish diasporic identities, comparing Irish women's experience in Britain, Canada , New Zealand and the United States. The book considers how the Catholic Church could be a focal point for women's Irish identity in Britain. It examines how members of the Ladies' Orange Benevolent Association (LOBA) maintained a sense of Irish Protestant identity, focused on their associational life in female Orange lodges. The book offers a lens on Irish society, and on countries where they settled, and considerable scope for comparative analysis of the impact of different cultures and societies on women's lives. It reviews key debates in Transnational Studies (TS) and Diaspora Studies (DS) before discussing the particular contribution of DS in framing 1990s study of migrant and non-migrant Irish women. Feminist and queer theory scholarship in Irish DS has begun to address the gender and sexual politics of diaspora by attending to the dynamics of boundary expansion, queering and dissolution. The book suggests that religion can be both a 'bright' and a 'blurry' boundary, while examining how religious identities intersect with ethnicity and gender. It also includes the significance of the categories of gender and generation, and their intersection with ethnicity in the context of the official London St Patrick's Day Festival.

Abstract only
Irish diaspora studies and women: theories, concepts and new perspectives
D. A. J. MacPherson and Mary J. Hickman

examines how members of the LOBA maintained a sense of Irish Protestant identity, focused on their associational life in female Orange lodges. While much theoretical literature has begun to recognise the gendered nature of diaspora formation, it does so largely within a framework dominated by considerations of family or personal networks that emphasise women’s gendered role within the private sphere. Instead, by examining associational culture we can begin to explore how women could engage in the public life of the migrant community and thereby help to construct a

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
Orangewomen in Canada, c. 1890–1930
D. A. J. MacPherson

, Orangewomen in Canada promoted a strong diasporic Irish Protestant identity through their public, political activism. However, promoting an Irish Protestant ethnicity was only one part of Orangewomen’s ‘diasporic imagination’ and, increasingly, we find members of the LOBA articulating English or Scottish identities through their participation in the Orange Order. In particular, the multiple and shifting sets of identities embraced by the LOBA became more complex during the 1920s, when many Canadian Orangewomen began to celebrate their Scottishness in more obvious and

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

identities held by female members of the Orange Order in England, Scotland and Canada during the twentieth century. What emerged from the reflections of Jean and other interviewed Orangewomen was a sense of how Irish Protestant identity interacted with, and was shaped by, Scottish, English and British identities. Although all born in Scotland or England, several had maintained strong connections to Ireland, mostly to Ulster. Moreover, this ‘mutative’ sense of ethnic identity was part of a broader set of identities that comprised these Orangewomen’s sense of self.2

in Women and the Orange Order
Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

more explicitly Scottish or Canadian identity. Orangewomen were thoroughly engaged with this process of ‘mutating’ ethnic identity and the various stages of migration, from Ireland to Scotland, England and Canada and on to locations throughout the British world, suggest that Orangewomen’s sense of diasporic homeland was overlapping, combining their more proximate attachment ‘back home’ with an overarching connection to an Irish Protestant identity.45 The diasporic consciousness of the women examined in this book, then, was anchored to a number of places and was

in Women and the Orange Order
Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

Ireland, Orangewomen in Canada promoted a strong diasporic Irish Protestant identity through their public political activism. However, promoting an Irish Protestant ethnicity was only one part of Orangewomen’s ‘diasporic imagination’ and, increasingly, we find members of the LOBA articulating English or Scottish identities through their participation in the Orange Order. In particular, the multiple and shifting sets of identities embraced by the LOBA became more complex during the 1920s, when many Canadian Orangewomen began to celebrate their Scottishness in more

in Women and the Orange Order
Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

women took part in the construction and modification of the Order’s Irish Protestant identity.142 As we have seen, this was an identity in which diverse versions of Scottish identity were espoused by Orangewomen, from the Lowland Burns, to the paraphernalia of Highlandism, from dances to kilts and clans.143 Migration The remarkable growth of the female Orange Order in Scotland coincided with a period of intense emigration from Scotland.144 Between 1921 and SCOTLAND121 1938, 418,496 people left Scotland to go overseas, with most moving to Canada, the United States

in Women and the Orange Order
The Irish in Australia
Patricia M. O’Connor

Ulster Protestant identity in the twentieth century: nations and patriotism’, in M. Busteed, F. Neal and J. Tonge (eds) Irish Protestant Identities. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 257–69. 3995 Migrations.qxd:text 162 5/8/13 11:39 Page 162 B ELONGING Hickman, M. and B. Walter (1997) Discrimination and the Irish Community in Britain. London: Commission for Racial Equality. Hickman, M.J., S. Morgan, B. Walter and J.M. Bradley (2005) ‘The limitations of whiteness and the boundaries of Englishness: second-generation Irish identifications and positioning in

in Migrations
Exploring long-distance loyalist networks in the 1880s
William Jenkins

Irish History 1800–2000. New York: Oxford University Press. Jackson, D.M. (2009) Popular Opposition to Irish Home Rule in Edwardian Britain. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press. Jenkins, W. (2007) ‘Views from “the Hub of the Empire”: loyal Orange lodges in early 20th century Toronto’, in D.A. Wilson (ed.) The Orange Order in Canada. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 128–45. Jenkins, W. (2008) ‘Ulster transplanted: Irish Protestants, everyday life and constructions of identity in Late Victorian Toronto’, in M. Busteed, J. Tonge and F. Neal (eds) Irish Protestant Identities

in Migrations
The politics of peace
Jonathan Tonge

politics in Ireland’, in M. Bric and J. Coakley (eds), From Political Violence to Negotiated Settlement: The Winding Path to Peace in Twentieth Century Ireland (Dublin: UCD, 2004), pp. 1–12. 20 W. H. Cox, ‘Who wants a united Ireland?’ Government and Opposition 20 (1985), pp. 29–47; B. Hayes and I. McAllister, ‘British and Irish public opinion towards the Northern Ireland problem’, Irish Political Studies 16 (2001), pp. 61–82; B. Hayes and T. Fahey, ‘National identity in the Republic of Ireland: does religion matter?’ Paper presented to the Irish Protestant Identities

in Northern Ireland after the troubles