Search results

Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

Theology, politics, and Newtonian public science

This book explores at length the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, the book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes that are considered to be emblematic of Catholic literature. Its breadth will make it a useful guide for students wishing to become familiar with a wide range of such writings in France and England during this period.

Brian Sudlow

In Les Foules de Lourdes written twelve years after Zola’s novel, J. K. Huysmans accuses Zola not of incredulity but of failing to consider his arguments carefully enough. Huysmans was not swept away by the spectacle of Lourdes; he lamented the commercialism, deprecated the occasional hysteria, and complains about the pilgrims who gathered around the Bureau de Consultations (where purported miracles were investigated by doctors of different philosophies and faiths), acclaiming everyone who entered as a beneficiary of a cure. 14 At the same time he constantly

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Abstract only
Neil Cornwell

slightly lesser extent, as well as Hodgson), but he also makes fleeting appearances elsewhere, under music and seer. He might also be a ‘seer’ in other senses as well; commonly regarded as a ‘prophet’, he was acclaimed, in a famous study of 1902 by the decadent writer D.S. Merezhkovsky, as ‘the “seer” of a transcendental spiritual world, whose works were prophetic and revelatory in that they penetrated “the illusoriness of the real” ‘. 4 The French decadent, J.-K. Huysmans (or at least his protagonist Durtal), in 1891, for that matter, looking for ‘the Spiritual

in Odoevsky’s four pathways into modern fiction
Brian Sudlow

of Adolphe Retté. A onetime anarchist and debauchee, Retté’s conversion brings him many interior trials which indicate the difficulty he felt in breaking out of buffered individuality. His attempt to submit his emancipated will to the will of God leads him to experience moral weakness, the sense of being lost in the world and even personally-motivated malicious urges which drive him to attack in print J. K. Huysmans, the decadent-turned-Catholic novelist. 10 In Du Diable à Dieu Retté stands back from his former self and describes in detail the war that wages

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
A critical exchange between Émile Zola and Édouard Manet
Lauren S. Weingarden

photograph) or a creative re-presentation of the real? Ensnared in the painter’s play with pictorial devices, we should now ask, to what degree does Manet as the ‘analytic observer’ conform to the naturalist painter that Zola configured? Before answering this question, I would like to insert a critical vignette which mirrors the (cultural) para-iconotext that I previously defined. In J. K. Huysmans’s 1877 review of Manet’s Nana, the writer conflated the painting and novel to produce a third dimension of meaning and provocation in the social imaginary.41 The painting had

in Ekphrastic encounters
Brian Sudlow

. 180. 7 Marianne H. Chalmers, ‘Patterns of Desecularisation: A Comparison of Religious Renewal in the Works of Léon Bloy and J.-K. Huysmans’ (PhD dissertation, Reading University, 1989), p. 176. 8 Robb, The Discovery of France , p. 116. 9 Baumann, L’Immolé , 1, p. 136, and 2, p. 83. 10 Ibid ., 2, p. 94. 11 Brunetière, Cinq lettres sur Ernest Renan , p. 92. 12 Huysmans, Les Foules de Lourdes , p. 310

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Abstract only
Author: John Potvin

Richly illustrated with over 110 colour and black and white images, the book productively contests the supposedly exclusive feminine aspect of the style moderne (art deco). It explores how alternative, parallel and overlapping experiences and expressions of decorative modernism, nationalism, gender and sexuality in the heady years surrounding World War I converge in the protean figure of the deco dandy. As such, the book significantly departs from and corrects the assumptions and biases that have dominated scholarship on and popular perceptions of art deco. The book outlines how designed products and representations of and for the dandy both existed within and outwith normative expectations of gender and sexuality complicating men’s relationship to consumer culture more broadly and the moderne more specifically. Through a sustained focus on the figure of the dandy, the book offers a broader view of art deco by claiming a greater place for the male body and masculinity in this history than has been given to date. The mass appeal of the dandy in the 1920s was a way to redeploy an iconic, popular and well-known typology as a means to stimulate national industries, to engender a desire for all things made in France. Important, essential and productive moments in the history of the cultural life of Paris presented in the book are instructive of the changing role performed by consumerism, masculinity, design history and national identity.

Society gossip, homosexuality and the logic of revelation in the interwar popular press
Ryan Linkof

of the gossip writer, see Wilkes, Scandal! , p. 149; Mosley, Castlerosse , p. 65. 25 See Hannen Swaffer, Really Behind the Scenes (London: George Newnes, 1929); Driberg, Swaff. 26 Balfour, Society Racket , pp. 91–2. 27 For Swaffer’s description of him, see Driberg, Swaff , p. 61. 28 This description comes from the editor extraordinaire William Comyns Beaumont. See William Comyns Beaumont, A Rebel in Fleet Street (London: Hutchinson, 1943), p. 109. À rebours is a work by the French author J. K. Huysmans noted for its ties

in British queer history
Abstract only
Angela Carter and European Gothic
Rebecca Munford

femme fatale and her innocent victims’ ( 1986 : 22). This Gothic imagining of femininity anticipates the vilification of nature and idealisation of artificiality in the decadent Gothic of the fin de siècle – in, for example, J.-K. Huysmans’s À rebours (Against Nature) ( 1884 ) – as well as the sadistic violence and Gothic symbolism of Villiers de L’Isle-Adam’s, Contes Cruels ( Cruel Tales

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers