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Daniel Szechi

In 1932 Sir Charles Petrie described Jacobitism as a ‘definite political movement’, 1 manifestly intending to evoke comparison with such early twentieth-century British phenomena as the Conservative, Labour and Liberal parties. He was being provocative, and some scholars still reject out of hand the idea that Jacobitism might have been a modern political movement in any respect. 2 Yet, while it is certainly the case that the Jacobites did not openly advertise their views in the national press, have parliamentary candidates run on a publicly avowed

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Open Access (free)
Thomas Carte’s General History
Ben Dew

134 COMMERCE, FINANCE AND STATECRAFT 7 Jacobite history: Thomas Carte’s General History A more far-reaching critique both of Rapin’s History and Whiggish ideas of credit was developed by the Oxford historian Thomas Carte in the 1740s and 1750s.1 Carte was a diligent and able scholar, and the author of a series of well-documented historical works including a three-volume History and Life of James Duke of Ormonde (1735–36) and the four-volume General History of England (1747–55).2 He was also a Non-Juror and an active Jacobite conspirator. In the 1720s he

in Commerce, finance and statecraft
Britain and Europe, 1688–1788
Author: Daniel Szechi

The product of forty years of research by one of the foremost historians of Jacobitism, this book is a comprehensive revision of Professor Szechi’s popular 1994 survey of the Jacobite movement in the British Isles and Europe. Like the first edition, it is undergraduate-friendly, providing an enhanced chronology, a convenient introduction to the historiography and a narrative of the history of Jacobitism, alongside topics specifically designed to engage student interest. This includes Jacobitism as a uniting force among the pirates of the Caribbean and as a key element in sustaining Irish peasant resistance to English imperial rule. As the only comprehensive introduction to the field, the book will be essential reading for all those interested in early modern British and European politics.

Daniel Szechi

The term ‘diaspora’ is used in the title of this chapter deliberately to evoke a comparison. The original diaspora was created by the expulsion of the Jews from their Holy Land into exile among the Gentiles, there to await a messiah who would lead them home. Hence it is an entirely appropriate term to describe what happened to the Jacobites in the century after 1688. They too lost their homeland to infidels, and they too languished in exile awaiting a redeemer. For the Jacobites, however, there were two forms of diaspora, one geographic, the other

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Daniel Szechi

Chapter 4 . The Scots Jacobite agenda, 1702–10 Turning now to the question of what the Scots Jacobites hoped to achieve by overthrowing the existing order in Scotland in 1708, it has to be said that prima facie the most fundamental of their objectives does not look very revolutionary: they wanted to exchange the Protestant for the Catholic line of the Stuart dynasty. If they had succeeded, one of James II and VII’s children would have been replaced by another. What would have made a second Stuart restoration truly revolutionary would have been its implications

in Britain’s lost revolution?
Exile, adjustment and experience, 1691–1745
Éamonn Ó Ciardha

2 Irish Jacobites in early modern Europe: exile, adjustment and experience, 1691–1745 Éamonn Ó Ciardha Sustained migration to Europe has characterised Ireland and Britain’s shared histories over the last fifteen hundred years. Close links with the Papacy and Europe’s great universities, religious institutions and organisations, the English Crown’s extensive possessions in France, and a lucrative trade in fish, wine and wool across the Irish Sea and English Channel account for much of this traffic in the medieval period. In the early modern era, the political

in British and Irish diasporas
Daniel Szechi

Chapter 3 . The Jacobite underground in the early eighteenth century The Enterprise of Scotland was specifically designed to serve the ends of the Scots Jacobite movement, and the next chapter will seek to establish the shape of the revolution the Scots Jacobites had in mind. But we must first address a previous question: why was it the Enterprise of Scotland rather than the Enterprise of England or Ireland? France was a great power with a large army and a professional navy and it certainly had the wherewithal to attack any part of the British Isles. The fact

in Britain’s lost revolution?
Rachel Weil

The news out of Newgate Chapter 11 The news out of Newgate after the 1715 Jacobite rebellion Rachel Weil T ‘ here is a sinister practice on foot to frighten clergymen from their benefices.’ So warned George Flint, the author of the Jacobitish weekly The Shift Shifted during the summer of 1716. The practice in question was to tell divines of the Church of England that they should flee because someone had accused them of treason. To prove the point, Flint printed a letter ‘counterfeited as from a prisoner in Newgate’ that had been lately received by a ‘divine

in Connecting centre and locality
Daniel Szechi

Because the Jacobite movement was by 1716 entrenched in the hearts and minds of a substantial minority of the population of the British Isles it was a threat to the Whig regime. And because the Whig regime controlled one of the great powers of Europe Jacobitism was ipso facto of considerable interest to the other great powers of Europe. From the Jacobites’ point of view an alliance with a European great power was absolutely vital. It was not simply a question of finding a supplier of money and munitions (although these were fundamental

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Jacobite Scotland and French grand strategy, 1701–8
Author: Daniel Szechi

This book is about a lost moment in British, and especially Scots, history. It explores in detail the events of 1708. The book uses this as a platform to analyse the dynamics of the Jacobite movement, the English/British government's response to the Jacobites' activities and the way the Jacobites interacted with the French government. Grand historical theses need, however, to be well grounded in the nitty-gritty of human affairs. The book offers a detailed narrative of the execution of the Enterprise of Scotland. It introduces the reader to the operation's climactic moment and at the same time corrects misapprehensions about it that have crept in to the historiography that touches on the operation proper. The book also offers a new interpretation of the role of Queen Mary of Modena as de facto regent and thus director of the movement in the early eighteenth century. It highlights the unusually prominent role played by particular Scots noblewomen, such as Anne Drummond, countess of Erroll, and Elizabeth Howard, duchess of Gordon, in the conspiracy leading to the '08. In a context set by a desperate, epic global war and the angry, febrile politics of early eighteenth-century Scotland, the book contends that Britain was on the cusp of a military and constitutional upheaval.