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Jacques Rivette remains undoubtedly the least well known of all the major figures in French cinema associated with the New Wave of the late 1950s and early 1960s. This is demonstrated by the fact that, although retrospectives of Rivette's films have been held in London, Paris and New York in recent years, the first book-length monograph on Rivette's work was only published in 2001 and, until now, none has been published in English. In the 1970s, Rivette directed his best loved and most enduring film, the inexhaustible, irrepressible Céline et Julie vont en bateau. This book begins with a consideration of Rivette's work as a film critic. It focuses on the apparently paradoxical nature of much of Rivette's criticism, a quality perhaps best captured in the seemingly opposed universes of two of Rivette's favourite directors: Roberto Rossellini, on the one hand, Fritz Lang, on the other. The existence of conspiratorial organisations is often suggested only to be denied in Rivette's narratives (Paris nous appartient, Out 1, and Le Pont du Nord), but frequently the atmosphere of unease generated by the film's visual and aural register serves to maintain questions and uncertainties in the mind of the spectator. The function and significance of the jeu de l'oie, and its eerie similarity to the map of Rivette's beloved city/labyrinth, have been amply discussed. The book also includes discussions on Rivette's works such as Histoire de Marie et Julien, L'Amour par terre, La Belle Noiseuse, and Secret Défense.

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Sam Rohdie

… je suis de plus en plus persuadé qu’il faut faire les choses faciles, et laisser les chose difficiles aux pédants. ( Jacques Rivette ) 9 Rivette’s films are composed of scenes or sequences made up of one shot or only a few. The sequences are relatively lengthy. If Rivette wants to change an angle

in Montage
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Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

Jacques Rivette’s filmmaking career has now spanned nearly fifty years, during which he has developed, and pursued with remarkable consistency, an extremely individual trajectory which has made his output, and indeed his position in French cinema, unique even among his colleagues of the New Wave and its attendant currents. An extremely discreet figure, he has never been an overt polemicist for

in Jacques Rivette
The film criticism of Jacques Rivette
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

It is generally agreed that Jacques Rivette was the single most important and influential of the critics at Cahiers du cinéma in the 1950s who went on to become the directors of the New Wave. Rivette’s influence can be discerned, not only over the ideas central to the New Wave itself, not only over the future development of the Cahiers (in which Rivette had an editorial role in the 1960s), but

in Jacques Rivette
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Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

Grange, where ‘the sanctum is also a prison’ (79). For Davies, this anxiety over the status of inside and outside in Wuthering Heights ‘records and structures a dread about the self’, suggesting ultimately that ‘the core interior of a person may be empty or haunted’ (79). At first glance, this framing and this ambiguity appear to be absent from Jacques Rivette’s adaptation of Wuthering Heights

in Jacques Rivette
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Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

Jacques Rivette remains undoubtedly the least well known of all the major figures in French cinema associated with the New Wave of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Although the Nouvelle Vague is constantly exhumed for discussion and dissection, for undergraduate teaching and theatrical re-release, and although the available literature on the likes of Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut is enormous and

in Jacques Rivette
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Games and play
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

‘To begin with, the single idea was that of jeu in all the senses of the word: actors’ performance, the interplay of the characters, but also play in the sense that children play and in the sense in which one talks about the free play of parts of a machine’ 1 (Rivette 1963 ). Thus Jacques Rivette described his approach to the filming of his monumental manifesto of the early 1970s

in Jacques Rivette
Bodies, love and jealousy
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

), ‘Le crissement des outils du peintre’ , Libération , 15 May. Daney , S. ( 1982 ), ‘Revoir L’Amour fou ’ , Libération , 22 August. Daney , S. ( 1984 ), ‘L’étoffe des éros’ , Libération , 17 October. Deschamps , H. ( 2001 ), Jacques Rivette: Théâtre, amour, cinéma , Paris , L’Harmattan . Didi-Huberman , G. ( 1985 ), La Peinture incarnée , Paris , Minuit . Elsaesser , T

in Jacques Rivette
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The unconsoled in Rivette’s late works
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

quoi le comparer, y compris dans l’œuvre de Jacques Rivette’ 7 (Frodon 2007 : 8). The singularity of Rivette’s late work is perhaps to be found in the bare, stripped down nature of the films’ narratives and characters. With just a couple of minor additions (the cameos already mentioned for Nicole Garcia and Mathias Jung), the dramatis personae of Histoire de Marie et Julien consists essentially of

in Jacques Rivette
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Narrative, conspiracy, community
Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith

. Frappat , H. ( 2001 ), Jacques Rivette, secret compris , Paris , Cahiers du cinéma . Hollier , D. ( 1993 ), La Prise de la Concorde, suivi de Les Dimanches de la vie: Essais sur Georges Bataille , Paris , Gallimard . Hollier , D. ( 1995 ), Le Collège de Sociologie, 1937–1939 , Paris , Gallimard . Hussey , A. ( 2002 ), The Game of War: The Life and Death of Guy Debord , London , Pimlico

in Jacques Rivette