Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "Jacques Amyot" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Philhellene Protestantism, Renaissance translation and English literary politics

Relatively late manifestations of the European philhellene revival of Greco-Roman letters presented to readers complex, extended prose fiction in which the trials of love mask an implicit moral and political allegory. Inevitably, coming during the Reformation, Counter-Reformation and the Catholic Reformation, this cultural phenomenon was not without its religious and political dimensions. Longus, Achilles Tatius and Heliodorus were the three principal English exponents of rhetorically conscious Greco-Roman erotic romance. This book enhances the understanding of the erotic romances of Philip Sidney, Shakespeare, and Lady Mary Sidney Wroth by setting them within an integrated political, rhetorical, and aesthetic context. It investigates how Renaissance translators alter rhetorical styles, and even contents, to accord with contemporary taste, political agendas and the restrictions of censorship. Particular attention is paid to differences between the French courtly style of Jacques Amyot and François de Belleforest and the more literal translations of their English counterparts. Valuable perspective on the early translations is offered through the modern English versions in B.P. Reardon's Collected Ancient Greek Novels. The book considers the three texts of Sidney's Arcadia, as a political romance sharing many of the thematic and rhetorical concerns of the ancients. It focuses on a narrow range of Shakespeare's plays including Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra. The book identifies Mary Sidney Wroth's masque-like prose allegory, The Countess of Montgomery's Urania, as philhellene Protestant political propaganda.

Victor Skretkowicz

–66), which he ceased working on by 1538, indicates serious engagement with Longus. 3 But the wider Renaissance history of Daphnis and Chloe begins with the anonymous publication of Jacques Amyot’s translation, Les amours pastorales de Daphnis et Chloe, escriptes premierement en grec par Longus et puis traduictes en François (Paris: Vincent Sertenas, 1559). 4

in European erotic romance
Abstract only
Victor Skretkowicz

. These editions both precede and overlap with Bishop Jacques Amyot’s French translations of Heliodorus (1547 (i.e., 1548); corrected 1559), Longus (1559), his monumental Plutarch’s Lives (1559), and François de Belleforest’s translation of Achilles Tatius (1568). On the Continent, both sides of the religious and political divide use prefatory dedications, and addresses to the reader, to

in European erotic romance
Abstract only
Victor Skretkowicz

–11. 2 See the transcriptions from Gohory, with commentary, in M. Fumaroli, ‘Jacques Amyot and the Clerical Polemic Against the Chivalric Novel’, Renaissance Quarterly , xxxviii (1985), 22–40 (pp. 36–40). 3 Sir P. Sidney, A Defence of Poetry

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

, Jacques Amyot. And, to a certain extent, the elegant neoclassical style that Amyot imposed on Heliodorus, Longus and Plutarch is carried into English adaptations of these writers. Philhellenism was encouraged throughout the Protestant world by Erasmus, and later by Calvin and his followers. 64 French scholars and publishers based in Geneva produced annotated editions of Greco

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

). Jacques Amyot also based his edition on Obsopoeus’s text. 16 He published this anonymously as l’histoire aethiopique de Heliodorus, contenant dix livres traitant des loyales et pudiques amours de Theagenes thessalien et Chariclea aethiopie[n]ne, nouuellement traduite de grec en françoys [trans. by Jacques Amyot] (Paris: [par Estienne Groulleau,] 1547 [i.e., 1548

in European erotic romance
Making room for France
Richard Hillman

John Russell Brown and Bernard Harris (eds), Later Shakespeare , Stratford-upon-Avon Studies, 8 (London: Edward Arnold, 1966), pp. 49–80, stands out for giving weight to the French translations – to the point of mistakenly stating (p. 53) that Thomas Underdowne translated Heliodorus from the French of Jacques Amyot. 7 Philip Sidney, An Apology for Poetry , ed. Geoffrey Shepherd (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1973), p. 135. Writing specifically of pastoral, Janette Dillon makes the following sensible remark, particularly pertinent to Chapter 3 ’s

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic
Victor Skretkowicz

Michel de Vasconsan, MDLVIIII, avec privilege du Roy . 8 R. Sturel, Jacques Amyot, traducteur des Vies Parallèles de Plutarque (Paris: H. Champion, 1908), pp. 615–19, traces the relationships of the printed editions from 1559 to 1619

in European erotic romance
A methodological induction
Yves Peyré

, dressed in women’s clothes, plunges a muscular, male arm into the chest to lift out a bow and arrows, while two similarly dressed young women view him with puzzled alarm, with Ulysses watching the scene. 33 Plutarch, ‘Life of Marcus Antonius’, translated by Thomas North from Jacques Amyot’s French, quoted

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries
Abstract only
Richard Hillman

plays as being exclusive; certainly, his recourse was assiduous and sometimes verbatim. Yet what seems to me irrefutable evidence proves that he also took the trouble, at least in a single local but highly significant instance, to consult Jacques Amyot’s French translation – the original of North – as edited and glossed by that indefatigable man of Calvinist letters, Simon Goulart. 5 The text affected involves

in French reflections in the Shakespearean tragic