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A guide to dark visibilities

Gothic as a genre has become more amorphous and difficult to contain. This book brings together for the first time many of the multifarious visual motifs and media associated with Gothic together with areas that have never received serious study or mention in this regard before. It draws attention to an array of dark artefacts such as Goth and Gothic jewellery, dolls, posters and food, which, though part of popular mass marketing, have often been marginalised and largely omitted from the mainstream of Gothic Studies publishing. The book moves from the earliest Gothic architecture to décor and visual aspects of theatrical design, masquerade and dance. It focuses on paintings in two historical spans from Jan Van Eyck to Henry Fuseli and from Goya to H. R. Giger to consider Clovis Trouille's works influenced by horror films and Vincent Castiglia's paintings in blood. Gothic engravings, motifs of spectral portraits, posters and signs are covered. The book then uses early visual devices like Eidophusikon and the long-lived entertainment of peepshows to introduce a discussion of projection technologies like magic lanterns and, subsequently, film and TV. Gothic photography from Daguerreotypes onwards; and Gothic font, scripts and calligraphy are then discussed. Finally, the book presents a survey of the development of newer Gothic media, such as video gaming, virtual reality (VR) games and survival horror apps.

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David Annwn Jones

.1 ). ‘Gothic’ was subsequently a designation employed originally by Renaissance artists to refer to Medieval architecture. I begin my consideration of Gothic art and architecture starting in France in the early twelfth century and continue my discussion with the work of Carlo Crivelli and Jan Van Eyck, painters of the Late Gothic period in art. As Fred Botting writes, politicians in Britain from the mid

in Gothic effigy
The visual art of Tim Robinson/Timothy Drever
Catherine Marshall

context for maps and cartography. Bartolomeo Facio, the fifteenth-century Italian writer and humanist, saw a map made by Jan Van Eyck for Philip the Good, now lost and known only through his description from around 1456: There is a circular representation of the world painted by him for Philip, prince of the Belgians, and it is thought that in our own time no one has made a more perfect work. It is not only possible to see the location of various places and continents on it, but to measure the distance between them.5 Elizabeth Dhanens argued that Van Eyck’s map was

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
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Peter Barry

similar set of concerns. Finally, it should be emphasised that ekphrastic poems should be able to work independently of the image concerned, which is not usually printed alongside the poem. Sometimes the image will be a familiar one, like The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck, used in Paul Durcan’s ‘The Arnolfini Marriage’ (discussed later), which many readers will be aware of in their mind’s eye as they read the poem. But the ekphrastic object is just as likely to be (say) a photo­graph which has never been published before, though it may be used as the cover of the

in Reading poetry
Its origins in religious drama
M. A. Katritzky

the sixth-century Ravenna mosaics, or an illumination of around 1290 in a Book of Hours. 21 From the sixth century onwards, each Holy Woman generally holds a spice container, with thuribles more common in the iconography until the tenth century, and apothecary pots increasingly dominant thereafter – as in the great altarpieces of Duccio (Maestà, c. 1310) or Jan van Eyck (Ghent altarpiece, c. 1423). 22 This iconographic formula varied little for many centuries, and

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
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David Annwn Jones

. One of the most impressive paintings of the Late Gothic is Jan Van Eyck’s Annunciation and the visitant angel’s jewels and be-gemmed crown are key details of the scene. Van Eyck was able to make the stones of the necklace gleam and dazzle by painting glaze over highlights, an effect that is only emphasised by the shade of the chapel interior. The growing popularity of this type of adornment in the

in Gothic effigy
Chaucer and the regulation of nuisance in post-plague London
Sarah Rees Jones

device is used in Jan van Eyck’s painting of a domestic scene now known as the Arnolfini Portrait (1434).26 The newly married couple are positioned between the intimate space of the marriage bed and the public world outside the window, the formal witnesses to this both private and public 104 Sarah Rees Jones Figure 5.1  Frontispiece, Troilus and Criseyde, printed by Richard Pynson, 1526? Chaucer and the regulation of nuisance in post-plague London 105 event are reflected in the mirror between them, and the overshoes which the couple will put on to walk out into

in Roadworks
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Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

shared by the townsmen of the Low Countries among whom they lived. 5 In music, one can no longer speak of a court style entirely distinct from that of the city, at least in Bruges. 6 Jan van Eyck was a court painter in receipt of an annual pension, but he also worked for Flemish poorters (or privileged burghers), perhaps most famously alderman Joos Vijd and his wife Lisbette Borluut from

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Film theory’s foundation in medievalism
Bettina Bildhauer

technique is prefigured in medieval and Renaissance painting. In The Film Sense (1943) Eisenstein refers to the multiple vanishing points and perspectives which combine in the multifocal (but not fragmented) works of Albrecht Dürer, Leonardo da Vinci, Jan van Eyck and El Greco. 7 Film, Eisenstein demands, should strive to similarly provide multiple points of focus. He also compares the way in which

in Medieval film
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David Annwn Jones

and decorative elements. One of the most impressive paintings of the Late Gothic period is Jan Van Eyck’s Annunciation (1434–36) with its splendid Madonna painted with weight and form inside her rich blue, ermine-trimmed robe. Van Eyck’s depiction of the effects of light playing over materials, their intricate folds and decorative surfaces, reveals a high level of skill. The way that the temple

in Gothic effigy