National identity in The Transporter trilogy
Jennie Lewis-Vidler

Until Frank Martin, Jason Statham’s celluloid identity lingered within the comfort of a distinct ‘Britishness’, from his mock-cockney and mononymous characters in Guy Ritchie’s Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Snatch (2000) coupled with his performance as ‘Monk’ in Barry Skolnick’s Mean Machine (2001). However, it would be

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Subverting genre and gender
Clare Smith

I drove a car off the top of a freeway onto a train while on fire. Not the car. ‘I’ was on fire. Rick Ford, Spy This is one of the tamer tales Rick Ford (Jason Statham) tells of his exploits as a

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Jason Statham: star!

This book offers an investigative analysis into the post-millennium rise to global stardom of British actor, Jason Statham.

It presents original ideas focusing on new notions about film and cult actor stardom and celebrity. Using in-depth analysis of Statham’s work across a range of multimedia platforms, including chapters dedicated to his film, pop promo, videogaming and tabloid persona, each essay will present this British actor as a postmodern phenomenon in a quickly changing media world.

Chapters include: new ideas about the reframing of post-millennial British film masculinity; Statham as an anti-hero; his videogaming work; investigations into his art films; the music of Crank; Statham’s clothes in his modelling, pop promo and film work; work across a variety of genres; his ensemble approach in The Expendables, and how he ages in that franchise; and a personal essay from Statham’s director of Spy – Paul Feig.

The book is written in a fluid and approachable style but would be of particular benefit to students of film, stardom, celebrity, gender and social studies. Its approach will also appeal to the general member of the public and fan of Jason Statham.

Contributors include Professor Robert Shail (Stanley Baker and Children’s Film Foundation) Professor James Chapman (James Bond), Dr Steven Gerrard (Modern British Horror and the Carry On films) and Hollywood film director Paul Feig.

Jason Statham, fandom and a new type of (anti) hero
Renee Middlemost

Diver. Model. Music Video Dancer. Street Hustler. Actor. While his real-life career choices may be more diverse than his acting roles, Jason Statham’s on-screen persona has unquestionably confirmed his role as one of cinema’s most successful contemporary action heroes. As his popularity has grown, so too has his reputation as a modern action (anti

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Paul Feig

I know this is a very scholarly book that strives to find intellectual theorems to analyze the never-ending appeal of Jason Statham. But since I’m a neither a scholar nor particularly intellectual, I can only approach the whole topic of Mr. Statham from one angle … I love the guy. I can’t even tell you what was the first Jason Statham

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Steven Gerrard and Robert Shail

movie, and in turn helped create profits for the studios. But times change. The contemporary film star, although not too removed from their forerunners, still plays a vital part in the film industry. They remain the outward face of it, appearing on talk shows to promote their latest efforts, giving magazine interviews, using social media. But Jason Statham is different to, say, Tom Cruise or Sylvester

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Martin Carter

language and avant-garde films which are the province of smaller independent cinemas visited by a select and informed audience. If we accept this generalisation as a given – mainstream versus arthouse – it would be obvious to categorise Jason Statham as a movie star with a clearly defined persona, and one who works strictly within the boundaries of commercial mainstream cinema. There

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Jason Statham as postmodern hero
Robert Shail

its final death throes (Tasker 1993 : 109–131). Jeffords takes a similar approach in her ironically titled essay ‘Can Masculinity be Terminated?’ ( 1993 ). The recent success of Jason Statham in the new millennium suggests that this form of cinematic masculinity proved more resilient than might have been predicted in the post-Reagan 1990s. The purpose of this chapter is to explore how Statham’s particular

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Steven Gerrard and Robert Shail

its deep slumber. The film, a co-production between American and Chinese companies with a Jaws -meets- Jurassic Park advertising campaign, starred British film actor Jason Statham. The aim of this edited collection is to introduce, survey and develop various critical analyses of Statham across not only his film work but his work away from cinema and across a variety of transmedia. Film stars are often

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The cult persona of Jason Statham, Hollywood outsider
Jonathan Mack

As one of Hollywood’s most prolific and recognisable action stars, the word ‘cult’ is not the first one brought to mind when one considers the career of Jason Statham. Certainly, sharing the screen with the likes of Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Vin Diesel and Melissa McCarthy in huge box office successes like The Expendables 2 (2012

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