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Author: Bryan Fanning

In the last decade Irish society has visibly changed with the emergence of new immigrant communities of black and ethnic minorities. This book draws upon a number of academic disciplines, focusing on the relationship between ideological forms of racism and its consequences upon black and ethnic minorities. Media and political debates on racism in Ireland during this period have tended to depict it as a new phenomenon and even as one imported by asylum seekers. Ireland was never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism. Citizenship reproduced inequalities between nationals on the basis of gender and race and ethnicity. The book explores how the processes of nation-building which shaped contemporary Irish society and the Irish state were accompanied by a politics of national identity within which claims of social membership of various minority groups were discounted. It examines the exclusionary and assimilationist consequences of Irish nationbuilding for Protestant, Jewish and Traveller minority communities. The book also considers anti-Semitism in Irish society from independence in 1922 until the 1950s. It examines how contemporary responses to refugees and asylum seekers have been shaped by a legacy of exclusionary state practices. Finally, the book talks about anti-Traveller racism, the politics of Traveller exclusion, the work of SPIARSI, and the efforts to contest racism and discrimination faced by minorities in Ireland as expressions of multiculturalism.

Allison Drew

majority and Jewish minority was intrinsic to pied-noir identity. Just as anti-Semitism was part of pied-noir culture, so settlers used the term Arab derisively for objects of material culture – dress, food, markets – but rarely for people. They routinely described Arabo-Berber people as objects. The terms ‘tree trunks’ and bicot (slang derived from the word for goat) were commonly

in We are no longer in France
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Brighter European–Muslim–Jewish futures?
Amikam Nachmani

all too clear when the absorbing countries Conclusion 269 clash with rioting Muslim communities and radicalised terrorists on the streets at home, or with militant, extremist Islamic organisations in war-torn countries in the Middle East and Africa. Many of the issues that have detrimental effects on the European–Muslim encounter do not present themselves in relations between Europe and its Jewish minorities. The latter see themselves – and usually, though not always, are so perceived – as full citizens of their European nations. They do not have a religious

in Haunted presents
Integration and separation
Aaron Kent

Britain 1656–2000 (Los Angeles: UC Press, 2002), p. 10. 9 R. O’Brien, ‘Establishment of the Jewish Minority in Leeds’ (PhD, University of Bristol, 1975), p. 9. 10 Ibid., p. 24. 11 D. Feldman, Englishmen and Jews (Guildford: Yale UP, 1994), p. 293. 12 B. Dinur, Israel and the Diaspora (Philadelphia: Jewish Publications Society of America, 1969), p. 55. 13 O’Brien, ‘Establishment of the Jewish Minority in Leeds’, p. 30

in Leeds and its Jewish Community
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Fiqh al-Aqalliyat (Muslim jurisprudence on minorities); Dina de-Malchuta Dina (the law of the kingdom is the law); Dar al-Islam (abode of Islam); Dar al-Harb (abode of war)
Amikam Nachmani

’, mentioned in chapter 4, is an example of this.) In the context of Europe and its Jewish minority, the journalist Jeffrey Goldberg has mentioned another difference (in addition to the establishment of Israel), between present-day Europe and the period 1933–45. In 1933 Hitler announced himself to be the foremost enemy of Jewish existence; today, Germany’s leader, Chancellor Angela Merkel, is one the world’s chief defenders of Jews. ‘Germany’s support for Israel’s security is part of our national ethos, our raison d’être,’ she declared in 2013.4 Over many years of the

in Haunted presents
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Ahmad H. Sa’di

there is not a thing which can justify it. I know that there is a security problem and I do not speak about infiltrators. I know existing considerations. ... Morally speaking we are a movement that should not tell lies and we don’t want to lie, in this issue however we live in a total lie. ... I don’t speak about the attitude of individuals towards the Arabs; I speak about the general line. I reject this approach. ... I don’t accept the justifications which were given. ... We have no right to request other (better) attitude toward Jewish minorities in other countries

in Thorough surveillance
Jews as Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries
John Edwards

continuously from the beginning of the Christian era until the late Middle Ages. This was certainly so in Spain, southern France (as Gaul had become) and Italy. Both the ‘Barbarian’ successor states of the West and the Catholic Church inherited late Roman legislation concerning Jews as well as so many other subjects. 4 Thus, by the end of the fourteenth century, a Jewish minority was quite widely spread over

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
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Ahmad H. Sa’di

contingencies affected this discourse, including the Israeli application to the UN for membership, questions of borders and refugees, the Israeli elections for the first Knesset held in January 1949 and the status of the Jewish minorities worldwide. This discourse developed because the bulk of the Palestinians who remained within the territories controlled by the Jewish state were in Galilee, a region which had been designated for the Arab state according to the UN partition plan. The fate of this minority therefore was not only an Israeli internal affair but also an issue of

in Thorough surveillance
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European opposition, Muslim migrants, impact on Jews
Amikam Nachmani

‘stunned’ or ‘not stunned’ would reveal how much religiously prepared food is being sold.74 There is also an economic aspect to the issue of stunned/non-stunned meat: butchers for the French Jewish minority – at 600,000 the largest in Europe75 – sell the back cuts of beef (forbidden to Jews who observe Kashrut, the Jewish dietary laws) to non-kosher distributors. If they are labelled, the latter and their customers might avoid the non-stunned meat.76 In present-day Europe, objections to ritual slaughter are gathering momentum, particularly those directed against Muslims

in Haunted presents
Joseph Heller

by the Jewish minority. The West, the Soviets thought, needed Soviet Jewish spies because having failed to spy on the Soviet Union on its own. Israel was also regarded by the Soviets as a bridgehead for Western subversion in the Arab countries. On October 3, Pravda accused Israel of concentrating forces on the Syrian border with the eventual objective of overthrowing the Syrian regime (‘General Rabin

in The United States, the Soviet Union and the Arab– Israeli conflict, 1948– 67