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The Spanish Civil War in cinema
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This book charts the changing nature of cinematic depictions of the Spanish Civil War. In 1936, a significant number of artists, filmmakers and writers – from George Orwell and Pablo Picasso to Joris Ivens and Joan Miró – rallied to support the country's democratically elected Republican government. The arts have played an important role in shaping popular understandings of the Spanish Civil War, and the book examines the specific role cinema has played in this process. Its focus is on fictional feature films produced within Spain and beyond its borders between the 1940s and the early years of the twenty-first century – including Hollywood blockbusters, East European films, the work of the avant garde in Paris and films produced under Franco's censorial dictatorship.

The State, autonomous communities and the culture wars
Duncan Wheeler

1978 at the Juan March Foundation). A positivist association of art with democratisation was most explicitly formulated in relation to the Joan Miró Foundation, modelled on the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. In a letter dated 27 November 1968, the artist wrote to the architect Josep Lluís Sert: ‘I have great faith in these people who are full of youth and can set new paths for the future world in the making. It’s very good that we are also contributing to it with our own effort.’ 17 When the Foundation eventually opened its doors to the

in Following Franco
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Des O’Rawe

the Sōgetsu School of Ikebana in 1929. His approach to ikebana was radical, and although it remained fundamentally faithful to many of the traditions associated with Japanese floral art, it was also influenced by his travels through Europe in the 1930s, and his interest in surrealism. After the Second World War, Sōfū developed a strong connection with Catalan art and culture, and he became friends with Joan Miró, Antoni Tàpies, and Salvador Dalí (who appears with him in sequences from Hiroshi’s early documentary shorts, Ikebana (1956, JP, 32 min.), and Gaudí

in Regarding the real
The Barcelona model
Duncan Wheeler

Companys Olympic Stadium, and a few-hundred metres from the Joan Miró museum. For better or worse, the Games not only announced Spain’s democratic credentials to the world, but also heralded a new age of peace and optimism in which the Catalan capital became a model for urban(e) control that, in Sharon Zukin’s formulation, effectively controlled ‘diversity while re-creating a consumable vision of civility’. 65 In a text originally published in 1998, Anthony Giddens noted how the ‘debate around New Labour, lively and interesting though it is, has been carried out

in Following Franco
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Des O’Rawe

in the 1920s, he had been trying to develop an artistic practice that circumvented rationality and responded directly to the rhythms of the body, and the images of the unconscious. While there are similarities between this approach and surrealism’s privileging of the body and the unconscious, Lye’s kinaesthetic attitude was much more anti-­rational, anarchic, and a-­political. Although, as Michel Remy has pointed out, Tusalava ‘shows affinities with surrealist qualities apparent in the works of Joan Miró, Paul Klee or Desmond Morris’ and his ‘exploration of

in Regarding the real
Des O’Rawe

of driftwood, and discarded metal, etc.) in a manner not dissimilar to Cornell’s assemblage techniques, or even Cage’s practice of dropping nuts and bolts into a piano. Rather than reproducing decorative colour and textural arrangements, Sōfū’s works were often dramatic, exposing broken branches and roots, and emphasising the essential particularity of each artwork’s found and fabricated elements.4 Sōfū had travelled to Europe in the 1930s, spending time studying the methods of contemporary artists like Giorgio de Chirico, Picasso, Dalí, and Joan Miró. After

in Regarding the real
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Reading Lawrence Weiner
Katie L. Price

1960 as a subcommittee of the Collège de ’Pataphysique, launched just twelve years earlier. The Collège was formed to continue the exploration of ’pataphysics, proto-Dadaist Alfred Jarry’s coinage for ‘the science of imaginary solutions’.32 Marcel Duchamp was famously a member of the Collège, as were such artists as Joan Miró, Boris Vian and Man Ray. The Oulipo consisted of mathematicians, writers and pataphysicians whose primary concern has been to research (anoulipism) and create (synthoulipism) forms and constraints with which literature has been or could be

in Mixed messages
Duncan Wheeler

she missed appointments. This was not a far-fetched supposition. In 1968, a well-documented dossier of police repression with multiple testimonies documented torture in prisons and police stations across the country. 21 A covering letter, signed by 1,200 individuals – including cultural dissidents Carlos Barral, Joan Miró and Enrique Tierno Galván, as well as Ana Fraga Iribarne (the Communist-sympathising sister of the Minister of Information and Tourism) and Alfredo Mayo (the leading man of early Francoist cinema) – demanded action in respectful but unequivocal

in Following Franco
Pablo Picasso’s Guernica
Duncan Wheeler

Spain maintained neutrality – ‘even so apolitical an animal as Picasso must have heard the rumbling of guns’. 2 Guernica was a commission by elected representatives of the Second Republic who asked Picasso – the acting wartime Director of the Prado – and Joan Miró to brandish their paintbrushes as artillery, to raise awareness about the plight of Spain in advance of the 1937 World Fair in Paris. The first public showing of Guernica was part of a satellite cultural battle with clear propagandistic intent. As Gijs van Hensbergen notes: ‘Another profoundly moving

in Following Franco
Hale Woodruff’s The Art of the Negro
Christian Kravagna

‘Negro Sculpture’ in the non-artistic category along with ‘Machine Esthetic’. The 1933 illustration The Tree of Modern Art , created for Vanity Fair ’s art print portfolio by the New York-based Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias, shows only the names of white artists, from Eugène Delacroix to Joan Miró. These are marked on the roots, branches, and leaves of the tree, while an African sculpture in the lower left corner of the composition is depicted more in the position of a spectator than a source. 17 A

in Transmodern