Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 50 items for :

  • "John Everett Millais" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Escaping the empire
Peter Mitchell

In John Everett Millais’ painting The Boyhood of Raleigh , two small boys sit at the feet of a sailor. One of them is richly dressed in full Tudor getup – a piped velvet suit and white ruff, with an extravagantly plumed stovepipe hat by his side on the ground, silk stockings, and dainty red tasselled shoes. The other is in more sober clothes, but clearly also the son of a

in Imperial nostalgia
New approaches and perspectives
Editor:

This book demonstrates a fruitful cross-fertilisation of ideas between British queer history and art history. It engages with self-identified lesbians and with another highly important source for queer history: oral history. The book highlights the international dimension of what to date has been told as a classic British tale of homosexual law reform and also illuminates the choices made and constraints imposed at the national level. It embarks on a queer critical history, arguing for the centrality, in John Everett Millais's life-writing, of the strange-to-us category of unconventionality. The book aims to expose the queer implications of celebrity gossip writing. It offers a historical analysis of the link between homosexual men and gossip by examining the origins of the gossip column in the British tabloid press in the three decades after 1910. The book provides an overview of the emergence and consolidation of a number of new discourses of homosexuality as a social practice in postwar Britain. It explores a British variant on homophile internationalism before and immediately after the 1967 Sexual Offences Act by mapping Grey's cross-border connections while noting strain against transnational solidarity. The book focuses on evidence collected by the 1977 Committee on Obscenity and Film Censorship to illustrate how gay men conceptualised the place of pornography in their lives and its role in the broader struggle for the freedom.

Michael Worboys

Everett Millais established the Basset Hound as a breed in Britain and sought to bring a more scientific approach to dog breeding and disease control ( Figure 16.1 ). As the eldest child of the Victorian superstar John Everett Millais and his wife Effie Gray, he enjoyed wealth and privilege. He was the first person to exhibit a Basset Hound at a British dog show and a founder member of the Basset Hound Club. He undertook scientific work in three areas: artificial insemination; ‘rational breeding’ using

in Doggy people
Execution, technical violence and the discipline of visual culture
Bethan Stevens

energy on what is unfixable; he never comments on a need for more black, for instance, which would involve impossible adding , rather than cutting. Figure 7.1 Dalziel after John Everett Millais, ‘The Finding of Moses’, wood-engraved proof for [Horatius

in The wood engravers’ self-portrait
Abstract only
Bethan Stevens

(Margaret and John are obvious candidates, since George and Edward were busier with management) or longstanding employees like Francis Fricker or James Clark. Figure 10.18 Dalziel after John Everett Millais, ‘The Foolish Virgins’, wood-engraved proof for Parables

in The wood engravers’ self-portrait
Signatures, authorship and relations between engravers and draughtspeople
Bethan Stevens

relationships but in the literature they illustrated. Anthony Trollope’s Orley Farm was published serially between 1861 and 1862, with forty illustrations by Dalziel after John Everett Millais. The plot explores Mary Mason’s forgery of a codicil, allowing her son to inherit her late husband’s property. Everyone loves Mary, but she is portrayed as a fake woman. She subtly seduces and

in The wood engravers’ self-portrait
Abstract only
Approaching engravings: medium and the parasite
Bethan Stevens

as John Tenniel, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt, James McNeill Whistler and Frederic Leighton, and it is these artists who have been widely credited as authors of what were fundamentally collaborative productions. The usual procedure was for the designer to make a drawing on the woodblock, which the wood engraver followed when cutting out the print. Sometimes drawings were tonal and

in The wood engravers’ self-portrait
The wood engravers’ self- portrait
Bethan Stevens

’. 32 Dalziel and John Everett Millais made twelve wood-engraved illustrations for the serial publication of Craik’s novel in Good Words ; Figure 2.10 was later selected to be engraved on steel for the frontispiece to the book edition. Hilary Leaf, a poor but educated woman, teaches writing to Elizabeth Hand, a working-class servant. There are

in The wood engravers’ self-portrait
Joanna Crosby

. 6 Apple Blossoms , or Spring ( 1856–59 ). Oil on canvas, John Everett Millais (1829–96) The painted orchard and the Gothic imagination Paintings of orchards were often sentimental genre paintings, but among them are some remarkable paintings that tap into the enchanted and dangerous associations of the orchard. Such a painting is Millais's Apple Blossoms (also known as Spring , and exhibited

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
Michael Worboys

friend, the painter John Everett Millais (father of Everett Millais, discussed in Chapter 16 ), told a story of one of Landseer’s less successful cures that nonetheless illustrates his methods: ‘Edwin approached on all fours a notoriously savage dog tied up in a yard and smiled so convincingly that the terrified animal snapped his chain, jumped the wall, ran off howling and was never seen again’. 9 In 1837, Landseer had painted The Old Shepherd’s Chief Mourner ( Figure 0.1 ), in which a Collie has his head

in Doggy people