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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Katherine Philips (1632–1664) Katherine Philips was born in London in 1632 to a family with puritan connections: her uncle was a puritan minister and friend of Marvell and Milton, and her aunt was married to a prominent parliamentary lawyer. She was an overtly religious child, able to recite sermons verbatim and committing to memory sections of the Bible, which she had apparently read by the age of four. She was educated at home until the age of eight, and then enrolled at a boarding school for girls in Hackney. Her father died just two years later, and with her

in Women poets of the English Civil War

For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

Genre and literary tradition in Katherine Philips’s early poetry
Gillian Wright

Chapter 4 Women poets and men’s sentences: genre and literary tradition in Katherine Philips’s early poetry Gillian Wright There is no reason to think that the form of the epic or of the poetic play suit a woman any more than the sentence suits her. But all the older forms of literature were hardened and set by the time she became a writer.1 I n A Room of One’s Own (1929), Virginia Woolf meditated on the difficulties faced by women of earlier centuries in trying to imagine themselves into English literary tradition. For Woolf, these difficulties were

in Early modern women and the poem
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

, enabling full comparison of the different versions that were printed in 1650 and 1678. Hester Pulter’s poems occur only in University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32, which is therefore our copy-text. Katherine Philips sits at the other end of the spectrum to Pulter in terms of textual complexity: there are two printed editions of Poems (1664 and 1667), of contested degrees of authorial sanction, an early autograph manuscript (known as ‘Tutin’), and several other manuscript volumes, including the important Rosania manuscript compiled after her death

in Women poets of the English Civil War
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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
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Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin
Stephen Austin Kelly

the London stage, there were a handful of Restoration plays with a clear connection to Ireland.   4 These prompt-books have been edited and published by G. Blakemore Evans.   5 The prologues, preserved in Harvard University, have been edited and published by Pierre Danchin. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 207 20/04/2017 15:33 Stephen Austin Kelly 208 Katherine Philips: addressing trauma The first such Irish play with an English author is Pompey (1663) by Katherine Philips, a translation of Corneille’s Le Mort de Pompeé (1644). We know from her personal

in Dublin
Poems and recipes in early modern women’s writing
Jayne Elisabeth Archer

their reputations, money and freedom. A comparable prescription is offered by the young Katherine Philips (1632–64). In ‘A receipt to cure a Love sick Person who cant obtain the Party desired’, Philips’s narrator offers advice to a teenage female friend: Take two oz: of the spirits of reason

in Reading and writing recipe books, 1550–1800
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

. Like so many other families, including those of Katherine Philips and Lucy Hutchinson, Pulter’s was divided along political lines during the 1640s and 1650s, but these records suggest that parliamentarian and royalist sisters continued to interact with each other. Another of Hester and Dionysia’s sisters is the addressee of Milton’s Sonnet 10, ‘To the Lady Margaret Ley’, and Edward Phillips asserts that Milton spent much time in her company in the autumn and winter of 1643–44, after the departure of his wife Mary Powell. Little is known about the political

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Editor: Susan Wiseman

In examining early modern women and the poem, this book explores how women use poetry, and how poems use women, in England and Scotland in the period 1550–1680. Several decades of critical writing on 'women's poetry', 'gender and poetry', and the representation of women, or gender, in poetry have produced a rich and complex critical and scholarly field. The book looks at the primary and secondary evidence concerning two key elements in the analysis of early modern women's writing, namely, women and the poem. It first explores the way women understood the poem in terms of the reception, influence and adaptation of past models and examples, working from the reception of classical texts. It focuses on the resources women writing poetry knew and encountered in chapters on classical inheritance, the religious sonnet sequence and the secular sonnet sequence. The book then examines the world of reading and readers, and looks at poems in terms of friendships, quarrels, competitions, coteries, networks and critical reception, both then and later. It also emphasises the tales that poems tell, and how those stories both register and shape the understanding of women and the poem in the world of potential readers. In examining women and the poem, the use of women as signifiers and bearers of meaning in poetry is as significant as women's literary production.

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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

–1700, 9 (2000): 238–56 Ross, Sarah C. E., ‘Tears, Bezoars, and Blazing Comets: Gender and Politics in Hester Pulter’s Civil War Lyrics’, Literature Compass, 2 (2005), DOI:10.1111/j.174 1-4113.2005.00161.x (accessed 27 April 2017) Ross, Sarah C. E., Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Britain (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015) Katherine Philips Anderson, Penelope, Friendship’s Shadows:Women’s Friendship and the Politics of Betrayal in England, 1640–1705 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012) Andreadis, Harriette, ‘Reconfiguring Early Modern

in Women poets of the English Civil War