Queering the Gothic Parody of Arsenic and Old Lace
Jason Haslam

Frank Capras Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), based on Joseph Kesselrings popular Broadway play, has been largely ignored by critics and Capra-philes. The film is generally perceived of as existing outside of the corpus of Capras other films, such as Its a Wonderful Life, Mr Deeds Goes to Town, and Mr Smith Goes to Washington. As Thomas Schatz states, the feeling about Arsenic is that it is little more than a serving of canned theater, an entertaining and straightforward recreation,of the stage play with virtually none of the style or substance of earlier Capra-directed pictures. Victor Scherle and William Turner Levy note that ‘Capra left the play essentially unchanged and did not embellish it with any special social significance’. In his extensive biography of the director, Joseph McBride goes so far as to state that the filming of Arsenic signals the beginning of a ‘flight from ideas’ which would continue for most of Capras career.

Gothic Studies
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Teresa Phipps

law. Instead, the essence of coverture lay in the power of a husband over his wife and her property, and the assumption that a wife acted under the coercion of her husband. 33 Surveying the invocation of coverture in the late medieval year books, Sara Butler has also argued that medieval courts were reluctant to definitively proclaim the ‘civil death’ of the wife. 34 While coverture is dominant in our perception of women’s legal status, Tim Stretton and Krista Kesselring have cautioned that in fact many of the rules

in Medieval women and urban justice
Abstract only
Teresa Phipps

discussions of coverture, particularly in the work of Tim Stretton and Krista Kesselring, but this study has provided considerable tangible evidence for this in practice. 8 By paying attention to the instances where spouses pleaded together, as well as the situations in which wives did not or could not appear in court, we are able to gain an enhanced understanding of the practical implications of coverture. There have been many components to this analysis throughout this study. First, the comparison of wives’ involvement in

in Medieval women and urban justice
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‘When Women goe to Law, the Devill is full of Businesse’
Lindsay R. Moore

, and the Law, 1300–1700 (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2013); Tim Stretton and Krista Kesselring (eds), Married Women and the Law: Coverture in England and the Common Law World (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013). 19 Pearl Hogrefe, ‘Legal rights of Tudor women and the circumvention by men and women’, Sixteenth Century Journal, 3:1 (1972), pp. 97–105; Ruth Kittel, ‘Women under the law in medieval England, 1066–1485’, in Barbara Kanner (ed.), The Women of England: Interpretive Bibliographical Essays (Hamden: Archon, 1979), pp. 131–2; Patricia Crawford

in Women before the court
Property, patriarchy and women’s legal status in England and America
Lindsay R. Moore

draws from the work of Marylynn Salmon in her Women and the Law of Property, but goes beyond her emphasis on equity by also drawing in the influence of the ecclesiastical jurisdiction in the colonies. 14 See the discussion of the role of coverture under Anglo-American law in Tim Stretton and Krista Kesselring, ‘Introduction: coverture and continuity’, in Stretton and Kesselring (eds), Married Women and the Law: Coverture in England and the Common Law World (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013), p. 5; Stretton, Women Waging Law, pp. 22–3; Barbara Harris

in Women before the court
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Leslie C. Green

51–6. For World War II see In re Kesselring (Ardeatine Caves trial, 1947) 8 War Crimes Reports 9. 53 Since the provision in Art. 75 concerns the treatment of ‘persons in the power of a party to the conflict’ this right (para. 7) extends to nationals. 54

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
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The limits of British imperial aeromobility
Liz Millward

, Skyways , p. 304. 15 S. Cwerner , ‘ Introducing aeromobilities ’, in S. Cwerner , S. Kesselring and J. Urry (eds), Aeromobilities ( London : Routledge , 2009 ), pp. 1 – 21 . 16 D. Harvey , The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change ( Oxford : Basil Blackwell , 1989 ). 17 Cwerner, ‘Introducing aeromobilities’, pp. 4–5. 18 Pirie, Cultures , pp. 1 and 3. 19 ‘Imperial air services’, in Burge (ed.), Air Annual , pp. 184–6. 20 G. Gibbard Jackson , The Romance of Flight ( London : Boy’s Own

in Empire and mobility in the long nineteenth century
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An introduction
Katie Barclay

, ‘Professionalism and the impact of England’s first women justices, 1920–1950’, Historical Journal, 49:3 (2006), 833–50. 21 G. Walker, Crime, Gender and Social Order in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 113–58; for how that has changed over time see: K.J. Kesselring, ‘No greater provocation? Adultery and the mitigation of murder in English law’, Law and History Review, 34:1 (2016), 199–225. 22 For a survey of the contemporary literature see: R. Collier, ‘Masculinities, law and personal life: Towards a new framework for understanding men

in Men on trial
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‘The prerogative of the wig’
Katie Barclay

Journal, 35 (1993), 1–21; T. Stretton, ‘Social historians and the records of litigation’, in S. Sogner (ed.), Fact, Fiction and Forensic Evidence (Oslo: Skriftserie fra Historisk Institutt, Universitetet i Oslo, 1997), pp. 15–34. 48 ‘Trial of Eneas McDonnell’, Waterford Chronicle (15 December 1827) Dublin. 49 G. Walker, Crime, Gender and Social Order in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 113–58; for how that has changed over time whilst remaining gendered see: K.J. Kesselring, ‘No greater provocation? Adultery and the

in Men on trial
Education, migration and Catholicism in early modern Europe
Liam Chambers

–25, 142–8; A.Veress, Matricula et acta alumnorum Collegii Germanici et Hungarici ex regno Hungariae oriundorum (1559–1917) (Budapest: Typis Societatis Stephaneum Typographicae, 1917); A. Fyrigos (ed.), Il Collegio Greco di Roma: Ricerche sugli allunni, la direzione, l’attività (Rome: Pontificio Collegio Greco S. Atanasio, 1983). 26 For a useful discussion see: K. Gibbons, English Catholic Exiles in Sixteenth-Century Paris (Wood­­­ bridge: Boydell Press, 2011), pp. 28–35. See also K. Kesselring, The Northern ­Rebellion of 1569: Faith, Politics and Protest in Elizabethan

in College communities abroad