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Therkel Straede

This paper traces the massacres of Jews and Soviet prisoners of war in November 1941 in the city of Bobruisk, Eastern Belarus. Sparked by a current memorial at one of the killing sites, the author examines the historic events of the killings themselves and presents a micro level analysis of the various techniques for murdering and disposing of such large numbers of victims. A contrast will be shown between the types of actions applied to the victims by the German army, SS, police personnel and other local collaborators, reflecting an imposed racial hierarchisation even after their death.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Demobilisation and the return to civvy street
Juliette Pattinson

This concluding chapter serves as an epilogue by recording the experiences of agents following demobilisation from the organisation. It examines how the SOE men and women, trained in unarmed combat and silent killing techniques, who had operated behind enemy lines under penalty of death and who may also have experienced captivity, fitted back into civilian life. It also considers how they look back on the war, noting that for some their experiences have been incorporated into the rest of their lives, while for others the war years have had a lingering

in Behind Enemy Lines
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Gender, passing and the Special Operations Executive in the Second World War

This book is about the extraordinary experiences of ordinary men and women like Wake who were recruited and trained by a British organisation and infiltrated into France to encourage sabotage and subversion during the Second World War. It draws upon personal testimonies, in particular oral history and autobiography, as well as official records and film to examine how these law-abiding civilians were transformed into paramilitary secret agents. The book is concerned with the ways in which the Special Operations Executive (SOE) veterans reconstruct their wartime experiences of recruitment, training, clandestine work and for some their captivity, focusing specifically upon the significance of gender and their attempts to pass as French civilians. Analysis of the training scenes in the film, which is based on the experiences of real-life agent Violette Szabo, provides an interesting opportunity to examine the filmic representation of the treatment of female students by SOE instructors. By analysing the impact that participating in clandestine warfare has upon notions of masculinity and femininity, it is hoped that the book extends the debate about wartime gender relations. The book serves as an epilogue by recording the experiences of agents following demobilisation from the organisation. It also examines how the SOE men and women, trained in unarmed combat and silent killing techniques, who had operated behind enemy lines under penalty of death and who may also have experienced captivity, fitted back into civilian life.

Juliette Pattinson

tonics Wake told me about this period of her life including the time when some of her male colleagues observed her urinating and another occasion when they photographed her changing from her khaki uniform into her pink satin nightdress. She dismissed these incidents, reasoning: ‘But could you blame them? Out there? I didn’t get cross about it, but I didn’t want it. But I figured that if I had been with a bunch of women that hadn’t seen a man, maybe I would have done the same!’ 2 Despite having climbed over the Pyrenees, been trained in silent killing techniques

in Behind Enemy Lines