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A supplementary glossary of frequently used terms
Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

Knevet’s language: A supplementary glossary of frequently used terms As we have recorded in the annotations below, and noted in the introduction above, Knevet’s language employs a Spenserian vocabulary, making copious allusion to The Faerie Queene, as well as Spenser’s other writings. It is frequently archaic (often repeating Spenser’s own Chaucerian diction), and also employs a dense lexicon of chivalric, heraldic, and courtly terms. In our annotations, we have refrained from glossing every instance of some of Knevet’s more commonly used terms and phrases; these

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

Textual introduction The manuscript Ralph Knevet’s Supplement survives in a single autograph manuscript, Cambridge University Library MS Ee.3.53, apparently prepared as a fair copy for printing. The full title of the work, as given on the title page, is A Supplement of the Faery Queene in three Bookes. Wherein are allegorically described Affaires both military and ciuill of these times. The title page also includes a note on the date of the poem, reading ‘This was finished Anno Domini 1635’; internal evidence gives no reason to doubt this date for the completion

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene
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Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

Introduction Ralph Knevet: Life and works Of Ralph Knevet’s life the bare facts are well established. He was born to parents Ralph and Alice Knevet shortly before 19 February 1602 – the date of his baptism – in the village of Hardwick, in Norfolk, a poor relation of the established Norfolk families Knyvett and Paston. The seventh of ten children, and the second son, Knevet would be obliged to carve out a life for himself independent of his immediate family’s probably small estate. He matriculated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, in 1616, but appears to have remained in

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene
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Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

Commentary Preface Knevet’s Preface draws abundantly upon Spenser’s ‘Letter of the Authors . . . expounding his whole intention in the course of this worke’, commonly known as the ‘Letter to Ralegh’, printed in the 1590 edition of FQ: as well as attempting to write a document with an equivalent scope, Knevet cites Spenser’s ‘Letter’ at considerable length, and paraphrases other sections. I haue knowne ... committ adultery with the clouds] Ixion fell in love with Hera and, in some versions of the myth, tried to rape her. Zeus, then, created a cloud that looked

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene
Daniel Featley, anti-Catholic controversialist abroad
Hugh Adlington

Chapter 5 . Chaplains to embassies: Daniel Featley, anti-Catholic controversialist abroad Hugh Adlington A t midday on 4 September 1612, a dozen or so men, English and French, assembled at the private residence in Paris of one Mr Knevet, an English gentleman abroad. The purpose of the meeting was religious disputation; the topic, the Roman Catholic doctrine of the real presence. For the next seven hours, arguments for and against the central question – ‘Whether the body of Christ were truly and substantially in the Sacrament, vnder the formes of bread and

in Chaplains in early modern England
Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

Knevet, A Supplement of the Faery Queene and morall, from two seuerall Persons, makeing Godfredo the fountaine of Politickes, or those qualityes, which ought to bee inherent in a Gouernour, and Rinaldo the subiect of Ethickes; vertues pertaineing to a priuate Man. But our late Spencer building his fabricke vpon the like foundation, hath contriu’d his worke so symmetrically, that his methode appeareth farre more exquisite, then theirs, hee haueing designed twelue Bookes, for the tractation of twelue seuerall vertues: which with their branches, allyes, and opposites

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene

This book is the first ever concordance to the rhymes of Spenser’s epic. It gives the reader unparalleled access to the formal nuts and bolts of this massive poem: the rhymes which he used to structure its intricate stanzas.

As well as the main concordance to the rhymes, the volume features a wealth of ancillary materials, which will be of value to both professional Spenserians and students, including distribution lists and an alphabetical listing of all the words in The Faerie Queene. The volume breaks new ground by including two studies by Richard Danson Brown and J. B. Lethbridge, so that the reader is given provocative analyses alongside the raw data about Spenser as a rhymer. Brown considers the reception of rhyme, theoretical models and how Spenser’s rhymes may be reading for meaning. Lethbridge in contrast discusses the formulaic and rhetorical character of the rhymes.

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Overhearing Spenser in Donne
Yulia Ryzhik

repeated by twentieth-century literary historians. Consider a couple of final examples: George Herbert’s poetry shows a pervasive awareness of Spenserian forms and modes of allegory. Coburn Freer’s magisterial Spenser Encyclopedia entry gives plausible grounds for believing that Herbert was deeply receptive to Spenser, even though we lack the sort of concrete evidence Abraham Cowley gives us of his delighted childhood reading of The Faerie Queene . 77 The recent publication of Ralph Knevet’s Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) suggests the emerging complexity of

in Spenser and Donne
James Doelman

has been a recurring concern of this study. This approach to commemoration is also reflected in funeral monuments and engraved epitaphs on women, which, Peter Marshall notes, tend to emphasize their private, domestic virtues. 1 However, some poets did emphasize the public dimension of the woman’s death; for example, Ralph Knevet writes that the death of Lady Katherine Paston was ‘More like a publike ruine, then

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy