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Thibaut Raboin

1 Narrating LGBT asylum Before looking at the relationship between LGBT asylum and nationhood, as well as how they configure certain forms of queer optimism, it is essential to unpack the main ways in which LGBT asylum is defined as a social problem. Social problems engage the state, which is asked to deal with a particular problem and solve it. The social problem of LGBT asylum is therefore part of a process of collective definition, representation and narrativisation that gives a shape to what really is problematic about asylum, what needs to be solved, what

in Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK
Kelly Kollman

Kollman 02_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:15 Page 23 2 Sexual citizenship, LGBT movements and the relationship recognition debate in western democracies Since the late 1980s state recognition of same-sex couples, and more recently the opening of marriage, have become the central focus of LGBT rights movements in almost all western societies. Although the idea is not entirely new, this focus on relationship recognition does represent a significant change in the prioritisation of movement goals from the 1970s and 1980s. This shift has occurred despite the fact that in

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies
Constructing a queer haven
Author:

Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK analyses fifteen years of debate, activism and media narrative and examines the way asylum is conceptualized at the crossroads of nationhood, post colonialism and sexual citizenship, reshaping in the process forms of sexual belongings to the nation.

Asylum has become a foremost site for the formulation and critique of LGBT human rights. This book intervenes in the ongoing discussion of homonationalism, sheds new light on the limitations of queer liberalism as a political strategy, and questions the prevailing modes of solidarity with queer migrants in the UK.

This book employs the methods of Discourse Analysis to study a large corpus encompassing media narratives, policy documents, debates with activists and NGOs, and also counter discourses emerging from art practice. The study of these discourses illuminates the construction of the social problem of LGBT asylum. Doing so, it shows how our understanding of asylum is firmly rooted in the individual stories of migration that are circulated in the media. The book also critiques the exclusionary management of cases by the state, especially in the way the state manufactures the authenticity of queer refugees. Finally, it investigates the affective economy of asylum, assessing critically the role of sympathy and challenging the happy goals of queer liberalism.

This book will be essential for researchers and students specializing in refugee studies and queer studies.

Open Access (free)
The Enduring Rage of Baldwin and the Education of a White Southern Baptist Queer
Jon-Marc McDonald

Delivered in Paris at the 2016 International James Baldwin Conference just two weeks before the killing of 49 individuals at a LGBT nightclub in Orlando, Florida on 26 June 2016, “Relatively Conscious” explores, through the eyes of an LGBT American and the words of James Baldwin, how separate and unequal life remains for so many within the United States. Written in the tradition of memoir, it recounts how, just as Paris saved Baldwin from himself, the writer’s life was transformedupon the discovery of Baldwin.

James Baldwin Review
Andrew Moor

The article notes a trend towards low-key naturalism in twenty-first-century independent queer cinema. Focusing on work by Andrew Haigh, Travis Mathews and Ira Sachs, it argues that this observational style is welded to a highly meta-cinematic engagement with traditions of representing non-straight people. The article coins the term ‘New Gay Sincerity’ to account for this style, relating it to Jim Collins’s and Warren Buckland’s writing on post-postmodern ‘new sincerity’. At its crux, this new style centres itself in realism to record non-metropolitan, intimate and quotidian gay lives, while acknowledging the high-style postmodernism of oppositional 1990s New Queer Cinema.

Film Studies
International norms and domestic policy change
Author:

On 1 October 1989, eleven gay male couples gathered in the registry office of Copenhagen's city chambers to take part in a civil ceremony, entering into a newly established entity called a registered partnership (RP). This book examines same-sex unions (SSU) policy developments western democracies and explains why the overwhelming majority of these countries has implemented a national law to recognise gay and lesbian couples. It presents an overview of recent developments in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) politics as well as the academic literatures that seek to interpret and analyse these developments. The study discussed adds to constructivist work on the international human rights regime, which has been a prominent focus of the literature. The book also examines the processes of international policy diffusion. It traces the development of a soft-law norm for relationship recognition within the broader European polity and illustrates how dissemination of this norm taken by transnational LGBT rights activists and supportive policy elites. The book presents in-depth case studies of Germany, the Netherlands, Canada and the US to tease out the extent and causal mechanisms by which the SSU norm has influenced policy debates. It looks at the ways in which the SSU norm has shaped policy discourse about relationship recognition. The book examines why countries with broadly similar parliamentary structures, party systems, levels of religiosity and confessional heritages have adopted different models of SSU policies. Finally, it inspects how much the European SSU norm has affected policy debates in Canada and the US.

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The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies
Kelly Kollman

specifically, and in keeping with theories of international socialisation, I argue that the creation and dissemination of a norm for Kollman 01_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:14 Page 3 Introduction same-sex relationship recognition in the broader European polity in the mid 1990s have focused national lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)3 movements on SSU policy, allowed these movements to frame state relationship recognition as a human right and helped activists to put SSUs on their country’s political agenda. Further, the dissemination of the norm has induced many

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies
Thibaut Raboin

2 Imagining a queer haven In case narratives, asylum enables the righting, here and now, of a wrong committed there and then. The narratives thus link homophobia as a global problem with hospitality as a domestic quandary. The problem of asylum shifts from being understood within the conceptual apparatus of human rights to being conceived of within the question of the hospitality of the state, and in particular of its asylum legislation. LGBT human rights perspectives used in asylum narratives rely in some respects on equivalence: forms of homophobia can be

in Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK
International socialisation across the pond?
Kelly Kollman

Kollman 06_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:45 Page 143 6 Same-sex unions in Canada and the United States: international socialisation across the pond? This chapter examines the extent to which processes of international socialisation have shaped debates about same-sex relationship recognition in Canada and the US despite their greater distance – both geographic and political – from the European polity in which the SSU norm first appeared. Perhaps because of these distances very little of the burgeoning literature on US and Canadian LGBT politics has examined the ways

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies
Common norms, diverse policy models
Kelly Kollman

parliament, and have just as consistently opposed the expansion of LGBT rights. The presence of these parties and pockets of social conservatism explain why the Netherlands, unlike its Nordic neighbours, was somewhat slow to legislate against gender discrimination in the 1980s and 1990s despite its growing international reputation for social permissiveness in areas such as the regulation of drugs, prostitution and euthanasia (Hekma and Duyvendak, 2011: 104). Indeed women’s participation in the workforce in the Netherlands is still significantly below their male

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies