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Thibaut Raboin

1 Narrating LGBT asylum Before looking at the relationship between LGBT asylum and nationhood, as well as how they configure certain forms of queer optimism, it is essential to unpack the main ways in which LGBT asylum is defined as a social problem. Social problems engage the state, which is asked to deal with a particular problem and solve it. The social problem of LGBT asylum is therefore part of a process of collective definition, representation and narrativisation that gives a shape to what really is problematic about asylum, what needs to be solved, what

in Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK
Koen Slootmaeckers

In Chapter 4 , I demonstrated how Belgrade Pride has become deeply imbedded in Serbia's European integration process and evolved into a litmus test for Europeanisation. In this chapter, I explore and seek to better understand how this process has shaped Pride as an activist tool for the promotion of LGBT visibility and engendering progressive change. 1 Although it has been recognised that Belgrade Pride, as part of Serbia's EU accession process, forced the topic of LGBT issues into the public

in Coming in
Kelly Kollman

Kollman 02_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:15 Page 23 2 Sexual citizenship, LGBT movements and the relationship recognition debate in western democracies Since the late 1980s state recognition of same-sex couples, and more recently the opening of marriage, have become the central focus of LGBT rights movements in almost all western societies. Although the idea is not entirely new, this focus on relationship recognition does represent a significant change in the prioritisation of movement goals from the 1970s and 1980s. This shift has occurred despite the fact that in

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies
Constructing a queer haven
Author:

Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK analyses fifteen years of debate, activism and media narrative and examines the way asylum is conceptualized at the crossroads of nationhood, post colonialism and sexual citizenship, reshaping in the process forms of sexual belongings to the nation.

Asylum has become a foremost site for the formulation and critique of LGBT human rights. This book intervenes in the ongoing discussion of homonationalism, sheds new light on the limitations of queer liberalism as a political strategy, and questions the prevailing modes of solidarity with queer migrants in the UK.

This book employs the methods of Discourse Analysis to study a large corpus encompassing media narratives, policy documents, debates with activists and NGOs, and also counter discourses emerging from art practice. The study of these discourses illuminates the construction of the social problem of LGBT asylum. Doing so, it shows how our understanding of asylum is firmly rooted in the individual stories of migration that are circulated in the media. The book also critiques the exclusionary management of cases by the state, especially in the way the state manufactures the authenticity of queer refugees. Finally, it investigates the affective economy of asylum, assessing critically the role of sympathy and challenging the happy goals of queer liberalism.

This book will be essential for researchers and students specializing in refugee studies and queer studies.

Open Access (free)
The Enduring Rage of Baldwin and the Education of a White Southern Baptist Queer
Jon-Marc McDonald

Delivered in Paris at the 2016 International James Baldwin Conference just two weeks before the killing of 49 individuals at a LGBT nightclub in Orlando, Florida on 26 June 2016, “Relatively Conscious” explores, through the eyes of an LGBT American and the words of James Baldwin, how separate and unequal life remains for so many within the United States. Written in the tradition of memoir, it recounts how, just as Paris saved Baldwin from himself, the writer’s life was transformedupon the discovery of Baldwin.

James Baldwin Review
Andrew Moor

The article notes a trend towards low-key naturalism in twenty-first-century independent queer cinema. Focusing on work by Andrew Haigh, Travis Mathews and Ira Sachs, it argues that this observational style is welded to a highly meta-cinematic engagement with traditions of representing non-straight people. The article coins the term ‘New Gay Sincerity’ to account for this style, relating it to Jim Collins’s and Warren Buckland’s writing on post-postmodern ‘new sincerity’. At its crux, this new style centres itself in realism to record non-metropolitan, intimate and quotidian gay lives, while acknowledging the high-style postmodernism of oppositional 1990s New Queer Cinema.

Film Studies
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Queer homes, households and families
Matt Cook
and
Alison Oram

cheek-by-jowl with typical Brighton gay service sector workers. However, the key element transforming this multi-occupied house into a ‘jolly alternative soap opera’ – like San Francisco’s gay Tales of the City 2 – was its proximity to Brighton’s queer centre and the sheer density of the LGBT population living in that part of town. LGBTQ people have long created new kinds of households by adopting and queering single-person homes, squats and collective housing, and family homes. In the first half of this

in Queer beyond London
Matt Cook
and
Alison Oram

comparison with broader social histories. ‘There are always stories passed down to you. We all know about the war and stuff because your nan and granddad passed those stories down to you and unless you’ve got gay relatives nobody’s going to know that and these groups are relatively new.’ 12 Many of the community LGBTQ history projects in the four cities were designed to bring older and younger generations together. 13 The Manchester project ‘This Is How We Got Here’ in 2014, on the history of the LGBT centre

in Queer beyond London
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Migration and the queer city
Matt Cook
and
Alison Oram

nationally recognized queer city to rival Brighton. 59 Manchester’s student population was the densest in the country. In 1991, over 4.5 per cent of its central city population were students, ahead of Leeds at just below 4 per cent; by 2001 that figure was 9 per cent compared to Leeds’ and Brighton’s 5 per cent. 60 LGBT people who migrated to Manchester in the 1980s and 1990s often came out as students and contributed to its growing queer culture. Nigel Leach moved here to study around 1980 and came out in the middle of his youth

in Queer beyond London
Abstract only
Matt Cook
and
Alison Oram

broader LGBTQ heritage. This is a persistent trend towards valuing a coming together, a desire for unity and conviviality among diverse queer people and with other groups and individuals in the local community. This was happening at the same time as new sexual and gender identities were being debated and named, and as more of them were added to the LGBT acronym – with ‘Q’ (queer), ‘Q’ (questioning), ‘I’ (intersex) and the embracing ‘+’. These extensions point to a desire for inclusivity, a drawing in of everyone

in Queer beyond London