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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Lucy Hutchinson (1620–1681) Lucy Hutchinson was an educated republican and religious Independent (believing that church congregations should govern themselves rather than be subject to ecclesiastical or state governance). She was born in 1620 to enlightened parents, Sir Allen Apsley and Lucy St John, who furnished the young Lucy Apsley with an education rivalling that of most boys of the period. While Lucy Apsley’s later identity as a puritan and parliamentarian was influenced by her mother’s religion, her father’s strong royalist connections also influenced the

in Women poets of the English Civil War

For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

Lucy Hutchinson and the classicisation of scripture
Edward Paleit

Chapter 1 Women’s poetry and classical authors: Lucy Hutchinson and the classicisation of scripture Edward Paleit Introduction: the distant muses – early modern women poets and classical antiquity E arly modern women poets’ search for cultural authority and poetic  voice involved a vexed, sometimes contradictory relationship to literary models (as Sarah Ross and Line Cottegnies explore further in chapters 2 and 3). Classical poetry was especially awkward for women writers to accommodate and imitate, for a variety of social and cultural reasons. Greek and

in Early modern women and the poem
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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

’s distinctive poetry in print, there is a strong case to be made that she corrected, or arranged correction of, the second edition of 1664, which does indeed represent a more skilful and fluid verse style. We have, therefore, opted to use Poems and Fancies of 1664 as our copy-text, collated against the earlier printing in 1653. For Lucy Hutchinson, decisions about copy-text have for the most part been more straightforward because many of her poems, like Pulter’s, are extant only in single manuscript witnesses. The exception is Order and Disorder, of which a five-canto version

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

nobility (such as her husband, whose property was sequestered while he was abroad). The dialogue form provides an especially apt mode in which to represent the fractures and dislocations of Civil War, where neighbour fought against neighbour and where even individuals’ consciences were often divided. Later she wrote antagonistically about the experimentalism of the New Science, but she was honoured by a visit to the Royal Society in 1667, the same year in which she published a biography of her husband. Like Lucy Hutchinson’s life of her husband, Cavendish’s biography is

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

. Like so many other families, including those of Katherine Philips and Lucy Hutchinson, Pulter’s was divided along political lines during the 1640s and 1650s, but these records suggest that parliamentarian and royalist sisters continued to interact with each other. Another of Hester and Dionysia’s sisters is the addressee of Milton’s Sonnet 10, ‘To the Lady Margaret Ley’, and Edward Phillips asserts that Milton spent much time in her company in the autumn and winter of 1643–44, after the departure of his wife Mary Powell. Little is known about the political

in Women poets of the English Civil War
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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

–17 Norbrook, David, ‘Margaret Cavendish and Lucy Hutchinson: Identity, Ideology and Politics’, In-Between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism, 9 (2000): 179–203 Osmond, Rosalie, Mutual Accusations: Seventeenth-Century Body and Soul Dialogues in their Literary and Theological Context (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 1990) Rees, Emma L. E., Margaret Cavendish: Gender, Genre, Exile (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003) Salzman, Paul, Reading Early Modern Women’s Writing (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006) Sarasohn, Lisa T., The Natural Philosophy of

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Editor: Susan Wiseman

In examining early modern women and the poem, this book explores how women use poetry, and how poems use women, in England and Scotland in the period 1550–1680. Several decades of critical writing on 'women's poetry', 'gender and poetry', and the representation of women, or gender, in poetry have produced a rich and complex critical and scholarly field. The book looks at the primary and secondary evidence concerning two key elements in the analysis of early modern women's writing, namely, women and the poem. It first explores the way women understood the poem in terms of the reception, influence and adaptation of past models and examples, working from the reception of classical texts. It focuses on the resources women writing poetry knew and encountered in chapters on classical inheritance, the religious sonnet sequence and the secular sonnet sequence. The book then examines the world of reading and readers, and looks at poems in terms of friendships, quarrels, competitions, coteries, networks and critical reception, both then and later. It also emphasises the tales that poems tell, and how those stories both register and shape the understanding of women and the poem in the world of potential readers. In examining women and the poem, the use of women as signifiers and bearers of meaning in poetry is as significant as women's literary production.

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From Republic to Restoration
Janet Clare

, deliberating in memoirs, histories, pamphlets and prefaces over the causes and course of the civil wars and the part they had played in events. Unsurprisingly, memoirs of parliamentarians and republicans  –​ Thomas Fairfax, Lucy Hutchinson, Edmund Ludlow, for e­ xample –​were to remain unpublished until later in the century.26 Lucy Hutchinson’s memoir of her husband, Colonel John Hutchinson, undertaken, so she says, from the personal motive of preserving the memory for his children of the Colonel’s ‘holy, virtuous, honourable life’, was begun after his death in 1664, but

in From Republic to Restoration