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Commemoration, gender, and the postcolonial carceral state

Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries brings together a range of perspectives on Magdalen history, experience, and representation and, indeed, institutionalisation in Ireland. It attends to many different manifestations of the lives and afterlives of institutional systems. The contributors seek to understand how these systems operated and how, after their closure, they have been remembered by varied stakeholders from survivors to artists to politicians. The Magdalen Laundries provide a focus for the volume as they potently illuminate the distinct social experience for vulnerable women in modern Ireland. Magdalen history brings to the fore the contested nature of institutional history, the particular attitudes towards women that saw them incarcerated (many for life), and the equally gendered attitudes that underpin the ways this history was first repressed then, more recently, commemorated. The laundries did not exist in a vacuum: they were part of a network that included Industrial Schools and Mother and Child Institutions. Given the proliferation of institutions, it is startling to note that investigations of Irish institutional history have lacked intersectionality – so alongside an examination of the history and remembrance of the Laundries, this volume considers the wider institutional context to demonstrate the broader dimensions of Ireland’s postcolonial carceral history. To understand this history we must see these institutions, and the women and children incarcerated in them, not as exceptional cases but as expressions of social attitudes that viewed vulnerable members of the population as morally suspect, a ‘problem’ to which the state, church, and citizenry responded through mass institutionalisation.

Magdalen Laundries

’. In ‘Witnessing: testimonial knowledge as ongoing memory transmission’, Audrey Rousseau considers how, in the wake of the official inquiry, the public can learn further about Magdalen history. Rousseau focuses on testimonial knowledge and its underpinning of two commemorative initiatives: the first, ‘Magdalene institutions: recording an oral and archival history’, a research project led by Dr Katherine O’Donnell (UCD) that collected eighty oral histories from people who were directly or indirectly connected to the Irish Magdalene Laundries, and the second, her

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Abstract only
Commemoration, gender, and the postcolonial carceral state
Miriam Haughton, Mary McAuliffe, and Emilie Pine

institutional systems. Throughout, contributors seek to understand how these systems operated and how, after their closure, they have been remembered by varied stakeholders from survivors to artists to politicians. The Magdalen Laundries provide a particular focus for the volume as they potently illuminate the distinct social experience for vulnerable women in modern Ireland. Furthermore, Magdalen history specifically brings to the fore the contested nature of institutional history, the particular attitudes towards women that saw them incarcerated (many for life), and the

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Our past and our present
Vukasín Nedeljković

At least three of the buildings managed by Direct Provision Centres were previously owned by religious orders who were also involved in the running of Magdalen Laundries. The buildings in question are at Mount Trenchard in Foynes, Kilmacud House in Stillorgan, and the Old Convent in Ballyhaunis. 20 These sites were not Magdalen Laundries but their previous owners are connected to multiple layers of generational traumas related to Magdalen history; these buildings hold memories, ghosts, and remnants

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Funeral and burial practices in Ireland’s Magdalen Laundries
Nathalie Sebbane

Ibid . 24 http://jfmresearch.com/home/preserving-Magdalen-history/high-park/ , accessed on 15 October 2020. 25 The Irish Press, 4 May 1989, p. 26. 26

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Abstract only
Testimonial knowledge as ongoing memory transmission
Audrey Rousseau

), while the second ‘picks out a source of belief or knowledge for the hearer’ (hearer testimony). 22 Inspired by the relationality embedded in the concept of ‘testimonial knowledge’, the memory transmission considered here in relation to Magdalen history focuses on that directed towards current and future generations of Irish citizens, but also to Irish diasporas and other people interested in women's issues (i.e. transnational feminism). The first step in adapting this philosophical concept, which

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Máiréad Enright

. Prunty, ‘Documentary sources for Magdalen history and the challenges’, Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review 107.427 (2018), 267–292; A. Enright, ‘ Antigone in Galway’, London Review of Books , 17 December 2015, 11–14. 44 McAleese Report, pp. 750–753. 45 R.M. Unger, ‘The critical legal studies

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries