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The politics of ‘dissident’ Irish republicanism

This book provides an analysis of the politics, ideology and strategy of ‘dissident’ Irish republicans. Based on the largest survey of ‘dissidents’ to date, it offers unprecedented insight into who the ‘dissidents’ are and what they hope to achieve. The ninety interviewees for this book comprise members of ‘dissident’ groups, independents, elected representatives, current prisoners in Maghaberry prison, former senior members of the Provisional Movement and individuals who were active in the Republican Movement prior to the formation of the Provisionals in 1969. This book provides insight into the Provisional–‘dissident’ divide regarding tactics-versus-principles, a debate which strikes to the heart of republicanism. Uniquely, through interviews with key players, this book presents the mainstream Sinn Féin narrative, thus providing an insight into the contested narratives of these two worlds which encompass former comrades. This book locates ‘dissident’ republicanism historically, within the long trajectory of republican struggle, and demonstrates the cyclical nature of key debates within the republican leadership. Personal testimonies of key players demonstrate a nuanced spectrum of opinion on the current armed campaign regarding utility and morality; and republican views are presented on whether or not there should be any republican prisoners at present. Through unique interviews with a spokespersons for the Continuity and REAL IRAs, this book delves into the psyche of those involved in the armed campaign. Key themes explored throughout the book include the drawling of the fault lines, the varied strands of ‘dissidence’, ceasefires and decommissioning, the Good Friday Agreement, policing, ‘IRA policing’, legitimacy and mandates.

Ideology and disunity
Marisa McGlinchey

within Maghaberry prison. Through interviews with current prisoners in Maghaberry, the chapter presents an examination of the ‘identity struggle’ which has taken place within the confines of the prison, which provides an indication of significant points of division in wider group relations. The chapter also seeks to provide an insight into the nature of the relationship between Sinn Féin and radical republican groups. A plethora of groups: ‘republican traffic’ Each Easter Sunday and Monday in Milltown Cemetery in Belfast, a

in Unfinished business
Marisa McGlinchey

, interview with the author, Maghaberry prison, 30 August 2013 Republicans involved in current military activity should be questioned on their actions and what they are seeking to achieve because if you’re born and reared in this place you’ve every entitlement to ask that question. Martin Óg Meehan, interview with the author, Belfast, 12 December 2012 Introduction Why should we fight for freedom? Is it not strange, that it has become necessary

in Unfinished business
Abstract only
Marisa McGlinchey

republicans have been imprisoned for up to four years without trial. Interviews with current republican prisoners in Maghaberry prison enable an assessment of the ideology and strategy of current republican prisoners. Research of this nature relies on personal testimony and oral history as one cannot consult IRA council minutes or even Sinn Féin Ard Chomhairle minutes. While oral history has its critics, who may argue that interviewees may simply provide a false narrative for the purpose of the research, rigorous academic analysis has been conducted on

in Unfinished business
Dissident republican strategies and campaigns
Sophie A. Whiting

department named Cogús45 campaigning on issues of prison conditions and have called for the donation of books to Maghaberry, whilst the IRSP also have their own organisation, Teach na Fáilte. Promoting the current prisoner campaign is an important aspect of dissident propaganda. For dissidents there are several beneficial reasons in promoting the campaign for republican prisoners. Firstly, highlighting alleged poor treatment of republican prisoners contradicts the claims of normalisation in Northern Ireland. In May 2011, republican prisoners in Maghaberry prison began a

in Spoiling the peace?
Motivations and aspirations: the drawing of the fault lines
Marisa McGlinchey

author, Galway, 4 June 2013. 76 Ibid. 77 Ibid. 78 Fergal Moore, interview with the author, Monaghan, 14 October 2012. 79 Pádraig Garvey, interview with the author, Killarney, 30 October 2013. 80 Member of the 32CSM leadership (South of Ireland), interview with the author, 2013. 81 Nathan Hastings, interview with the author, Maghaberry prison, 8 March 2017. Nathan Hastings is from Derry and has been in Maghaberry prison since

in Unfinished business
Marisa McGlinchey

Nathan Hastings, interview with the author, Maghaberry prison, 8 March 2017. 62 Danny Morrison, interview with the author, Belfast, 7 May 2014. 63 Phil O’ Donoghue, interview with the author, Kilkenny, 4 November 2013. 64 Nathan Hastings, interview with the author, Maghaberry prison, 8 March 2017. 65 RSF Ard Fheis, Wynn’s Hotel, Dublin, 2 November 2013. Attended by the author. 66 Dee Fennell, interview with the author, Belfast, 28 November 2013

in Unfinished business
Marisa McGlinchey

marking the culmination of Sinn Féin’s transformed position regarding policing. The symbolism of Martin McGuinness next to the PSNI chief constable on the steps of Stormont was not lost on radical republicans. Republicans have highlighted Sinn Féin members assuming positions on policing boards and have argued that Sinn Féin is supporting a police service which arrests and imprisons republicans, including former comrades. Republicans such as Marian Price and Martin Corey have been imprisoned for up to four years in Maghaberry prison without trial, leading radical

in Unfinished business
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley and Catherine McGlynn

imprisonment of republicans has always been an issue that evokes suffering and symbolises effectively the ongoing struggle and objection to partition. In 2003, the IRSP’s Eddie McGarrigle urged INLA former prisoners to support the campaign by Real and Continuity IRA prisoners for segregation of republicans in Maghaberry prison, stating that: ‘The IRSP fully support the right to segregation and we

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Chris Gilligan

’. He was then walked past his family and taken to a prison van and locked in the back with other detained men, all of whom were Black. The van was then driven more than twenty miles away to Maghaberry Prison. Once at the prison Kakopa was strip-searched and then locked in a cell with a convicted criminal. He asked for permission to call his family to let them know where he was. His request was denied. In fact, he was denied the right to make any phone call. He was detained in prison for two days and when he was released, without any charges having been brought

in Northern Ireland and the crisis of anti-racism