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B ETWEEN THE REFORMATION and the Restoration, Manchester Collegiate Church had more ups and downs than the Grand Old Duke of York. It was dissolved twice, in 1547 and 1649, restored twice, in 1556 and 1660, and all but dissolved twice, in 1559 and 1609, requiring two further re-foundations, in 1578 and 1635. As the contemporary church historian Thomas Fuller remarked, ‘This Colledge hath passed many Dissolutions and refoundations’. 1 This confused history reflected a national church in which there

in Manchester Cathedral
A history of the Collegiate Church and Cathedral, 1421 to the present
Editor: Jeremy Gregory

Founded in 1421, the Collegiate Church of Manchester, which became a cathedral in 1847, is of outstanding historical and architectural importance. But until now it has not been the subject of a comprehensive study. Appearing on the 600th anniversary of the Cathedral’s inception by Henry V, this book explores the building’s past and its place at the heart of the world's first industrial city, touching on everything from architecture and music to misericords and stained glass. Written by a team of renowned experts and beautifully illustrated with more than 100 photographs, this history of the ‘Collegiate Church’ is at the same time a history of the English church in miniature.

illegitimate son of the Earl of Huntingdon, known simply as John Huntingdon, who became the first Warden of Manchester Collegiate Church. If it was Thomas Langley and Thomas de la Warre who provided the inspiration and the money behind Manchester College, it was John Huntingdon who shaped their vision into the realities of stone and glass, prayer and service. Warden of the College for over thirty years, Huntingdon began the long slow process of rebuilding the existing church. His greatest architectural achievement was

in Manchester Cathedral
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Reformation and Establishment of Religion, and other various occurrences in the Church of England, during Queen Elizabeth’s happy reign , 4 vols in 7, in Works (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1824), in Hibbert-Ware, History of the Foundations , vol. 1, p. 81. 46 Oxford, Bodl., MS Tanner 144, Proceedings before Commissioners inquiring into the state of Manchester Collegiate Church, 1576, fol. 47v. 47 Hollingworth, Mancuniensis , p. 86

in Manchester Cathedral

Manchester 1715’, in Horner (ed.), Early Modern Manchester , pp. 81–94. 29 For what follows I am indebted to a detailed statistical analysis supplementing my own earlier observations, in Graham A. Hendy, ‘The Prebends of Georgian England: A Case Study of the Cathedral and Collegiate Churches of Manchester, Salisbury, Southwell and Winchester 1660–1840’ (MPhil dissertation, University of Wales, Lampeter, 2007); and his ‘Manchester Collegiate Church: the Wardens and Fellows

in Manchester Cathedral
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ringing of Bob Major by the Manchester Collegiate Church Society of Change-Ringers, a peal rung to mark the new year of 1819. 49 However, whilst the fate of many memorial plaques, such as that marking the burial of Major Richard Cust on a pillar close to the south door, is unknown, others were treated with greater respect. This, to give one important example, was the case with the Heyrick tablet, when well-intentioned efforts to warm the Collegiate Church by installing a ‘preposterous iron stove’ caused it to be

in Manchester Cathedral