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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Margaret Cavendish (?1623–1673) Margaret Cavendish was born around 1623 to the Lucas family of Essex. In her autobiography (A True Relation of my Birth, Breeding and Life), she remembers a happy childhood and an education focused on needlework and music. After a year living in Oxford with her sister, Margaret became a maid of honour to Queen Henrietta Maria, whose court was based in the city. She followed the court to Paris in 1644, and there she met and married William Cavendish, a royalist commander and widower thirty years her senior. William Cavendish was a

in Women poets of the English Civil War

For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, were all placed at the beginning of the volume – suggesting that Philips should be read as a poet writing on matters of political significance.2 For Margaret Cavendish, the two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. While 1653 is 318 Textual introduction usually prioritised as the first iteration of Cavendish

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Poems and recipes in early modern women’s writing
Jayne Elisabeth Archer

waters. 2 In Wright’s scene, the absurdity of the alchemical enterprise is transposed onto the character of Mrs Lovewitt, and, by implication, the figure of the woman as scientist and author. In so doing, Wright could be inviting his audience to perceive, in Mrs Lovewitt, a critique of another woman writer and would-be scientist. Margaret Cavendish, duchess of Newcastle

in Reading and writing recipe books, 1550–1800
Amanda L. Capern

there was only, in fact, a very small increase in the number of published secular works by women before the 1670s.6 It is known that social, familial and epistolary networks formed extraordinary ‘sites of [intellectual] production’ between women, yet, apart from the works of Margaret Cavendish in the 1650s, there were virtually no secular works of political thinking by women that went from manuscript to print.7 Only in the mid-​1670s, around the time when Bathsua Makin published the first pedagogical work by a woman in An Essay to Revive the Antient Education of

in From Republic to Restoration
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Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Katherine Philips, The Matchless Orinda, vol. 1: The Poems; vol. 2: The Letters (Stump Cross, Essex: Stump Cross Books, 1990) Wright, Gillian, ‘Textuality, Privacy and Politics: Katherine Philips’s Poems in Manuscript and Print’, in James Daybell and Peter Hinds (eds), Material Readings of Early Modern Culture (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2010), pp. 163–82 Margaret Cavendish Battigelli, Anna, Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998) Brady, Andrea, ‘Dying with Honour: Literary Propaganda and the Second English Civil War

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Leonie Hannan

-writers lay women with financial and social clout, such as Mary Delany and, her sister, Ann Granville (later D’Ewes). As Ann Granville wrote, in a letter to Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, it was Elstob’s scholarly standing coupled with her lowly circumstances that first attracted their interest: The first thing which rais’d my curiosity to enquire after Mrs Elstob was her Saxon Grammar … she delivers her reasons for this work very nobly in an English Preface to the whole from which (though I by no means presume myself a judge of Learning) I conceiv’d a

in Women of letters
Open Access (free)
Sukanta Chaudhuri

dispossessed. Such pastoral rarely approaches the raw realism and protest voiced by Barclay a century earlier: everything else apart, the diction of pastoral (as of virtually all poetry) has grown more refined in the interim. More often now, the common shepherd-spokesman may be allied to the Puritan middle class; but even when the voice belongs to the relatively privileged (or greatly so, as with Margaret Cavendish), the ideological fracture at the heart of pastoral can be used to good purpose. Cavendish belongs to an eminent line of Royalists. With the Puritan

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Living spirituality

Between 1598 and 1800, an estimated 3, 271 Catholic women left England to enter convents on the Continent. This study focuses more particularly upon those who became Benedictines in the seventeenth century, choosing exile in order to pursue their vocation for an enclosed life. Through the study of a wide variety of original manuscripts, including chronicles, death notices, clerical instructions, texts of spiritual guidance, but also the nuns’ own collections of notes, this book highlights the tensions between the contemplative ideal and the nuns’ personal experiences. Its first four chapters adopt a traditional historical approach to illustrate the tensions between theory and practice in the ideal of being dead to the world. They offer a prosopographical study of Benedictine convents in exile, and show how those houses were both cut-off and enclosed yet very much in touch with the religious and political developments at home. The next fur chapters propose a different point of entry into the history of nuns, with a study of emotions and the senses in the cloister, delving into the textual analysis of the nuns’ personal and communal documents to explore aspect of a lived spirituality, when the body, which so often hindered the spirit, at times enabled spiritual experience.