Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 74 items for :

  • "Marlon Brando" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All

Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain explores the relationship between classic American films about juvenile delinquency and British popular youth culture in the mid-twentieth century. The book examines the censorship, publicity and fandom surrounding such Hollywood films as The Wild One, Blackboard Jungle, Rebel Without a Cause, Rock Around the Clock and Jailhouse Rock alongside such British films as The Blue Lamp, Spare the Rod and Serious Charge. Intersecting with star studies and social and cultural history, this is the first book to re-vision the stardom surrounding three extraordinarily influential Hollywood stars: Marlon Brando, James Dean and Elvis Presley. By looking specifically at the meanings of these American stars to British fans, this analysis provides a logical and sustained narrative that explains how and why these Hollywood images fed into, and disrupted, British cultural life. Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain is based upon a wide range of sources including censorship records, both mainstream and trade newspapers and periodicals, archival accounts and memoirs, as well as the films themselves. The book is a timely intervention of film culture and focuses on key questions about screen violence and censorship, masculinity and transnational stardom, method acting and performance, Americanisation and popular post-war British culture. The book is essential reading for researchers, academics and students of film and social and cultural history, alongside general readers interested in the links between the media and popular youth culture in the 1950s.

Julius Caesar
Maria Wyke

In studio publicity, trade papers, reviews, articles, and educational materials, Joseph L. Mankiewiczs Julius Caesar (1953) was described and accepted as a faithful and mostly pleasing adaptation of Shakespearean drama to the Hollywood screen. As Variety accurately predicted, it achieved four Oscar nominations, one award for art direction and set decoration, high grosses, a hit soundtrack album, and several subsequent revivals. With the content more or less given, contemporary discussion focussed closely on how the verbal had been visualised, on how theatre had been turned into cinema – in short, on the film‘s style. It is with contemporary and subsequent readings of the film‘s style that this article is concerned, where, following David Bordwell, style is taken to mean ‘a films systematic and significant use of techniques of the medium’. But whereas Bordwell analyses film style directly in terms of an aesthetic history he considers to be distinct from the history of the film industry, its technology, or a films relation to society, I explore interpretations of one film‘s style that are heavily invested with socio-political meaning. If, in Bordwell‘s organic metaphor, style is the flesh of film, these readings of style explicitly dress that flesh in socio-political clothing. This analysis of Julius Caesar, then, is not another contribution to debates about adaptation, theatre on film, or Shakespeare on screen, but about the politics of film style.

Film Studies
Collaborating with James Baldwin on a Screenplay of Giovanni’s Room
Michael Raeburn

The author discusses his personal relationship with James Baldwin, recounting their collaboration on a film script for an adaptation of Giovanni’s Room.

James Baldwin Review
Marlon Brando and The Wild One ban in the UK
Anna Ariadne Knight

1 ‘Attractive and imitable’: Marlon Brando and The Wild One ban in the UK If anything, the reaction to the picture said more about the audience than it did about the film. Marlon Brando, Songs My Mother Taught Me, 19941 I would say let it be seen. It is so far removed from anything that could possibly happen in this country that it borders on farce. John Watney, Sunday Dispatch, 19542 In April 1955, The Wild One, starring Marlon Brando, premiered at the Rex Cinema in Cambridge. This was no ordinary screening, since the film had recently been denied a

in Screening the Hollywood rebels in 1950s Britain
Abstract only
Anna Ariadne Knight

’s photo as the ‘jailbird’ Vince Everett furnishes many a barber shop window in London; and novelty lighters decorated with the ‘incendiary’ image of James Dean as rebellious teen Jim Stark can still be picked up at Camden market. Recently, a credit card commercial promoting quintessential American jeans showed the surly, leather-clad Marlon Brando as Johnny Strabler dismounting a Triumph Thunderbird.1 In part, this book attempts to deconstruct the mystique enshrouding these iconic rebels and account for why such images have endured for so long. From the earliest

in Screening the Hollywood rebels in 1950s Britain
Abstract only
The rise of the Angry Young Men
Anna Ariadne Knight

Conclusion The rise of the Angry Young Men It was pre-sixties. People were looking for rebellion. I happened to be in the right place at the right time with the right state of mind. In a sense, [The Wild One] was my own story, rebelling for the sake of rebelling. Marlon Brando, Listen to Me Marlon (2015)1 Entitling the book Screening the Hollywood rebels serves its main objectives: namely, to re-evaluate how the British censors screened these cinematic images of masculine rebellion before home audiences saw them; and to explore how British critics and audiences

in Screening the Hollywood rebels in 1950s Britain
Abstract only
A reading of Charles Olson’s ‘The Lordly and Isolate Satyrs’
Stephen Fredman

one social response to the Machine Age can be found in the ‘devil-may-care men who have taken / to railroading / out of sheer lust of adventure’, ‘The Lordly and Isolate Satyrs’ invokes a similar response to the furious industrialization after World War II.12 Olson memorializes the motorcycle club as a resistant social nexus newly emergent in popular culture, having his satyrs assume the guise of Marlon Brando in The Wild One (1953) or James Dean in Rebel Without a Cause (1955). The poem begins: The lordly and isolate satyrs—look at them come in on the left side of

in Contemporary Olson
Elvis Presley as a rock ’n’ roll rebel
Anna Ariadne Knight

Hollywood career, Presley appeared in a series of mundane formulaic vehicles geared towards selling his movie soundtracks. Yet my analysis of studio pressbooks and fan materials demonstrates that in his early roles as a juvenile delinquent he was presented as a credible actor-singer in Britain, and the natural successor to Marlon Brando and James Dean. This chapter focuses on Jailhouse Rock (Richard Thorpe, 1957) and King Creole (Michael Curtiz, 1958) to show that Presley’s juvenile delinquency roles are the nexus between Hollywood’s rebel films and the rock ’n’ roll

in Screening the Hollywood rebels in 1950s Britain
Blackboard Jungle fever in the classroom
Anna Ariadne Knight

depiction of ‘revolting hooliganism’ likely to offend adults and have a ‘damaging and harmful effect’ on 16- to 18-year-olds not barred from watching X certificate films.20 ‘Our Teddy boys are angels’ 85 In Chapter 1, I argued that The Wild One was banned because Marlon Brando was considered too attractive and admirable rather than because of excessive violence. At the height of his popularity in Britain, Brando’s method acting and status as a fully fledged star transformed Johnny Strabler from a despicable law-breaker into a glamorous daredevil. As a vehicle for

in Screening the Hollywood rebels in 1950s Britain
Abstract only
Sam Rohdie

, within and without the film. Bertolucci is a master of such formations, reminiscent of Pasolini who delighted in creating analogies, differences in likenesses on which Bertolucci’s films depend. Rosa’s husband Paul, played by Marlon Brando in Ultimo tango a Parigi (1972), had, before the film begins, just committed suicide by cutting her throat. While the maid cleans Rosa’s blood from the mirror in the bathroom, she narrates the story of Paul, but to whom is not clear, most probably to the police after Paul’s murder: he was a fighter, but things went badly for him

in Film modernism