Search results

Author: Kevern Verney

The blossoming of interest in black history since the 1950s was directly linked to the rise of Martin Luther King and the post-Second World War Civil Rights Movement. The advances achieved in desegregation and black voting rights since the 1950s suggested that this was a destination that King's children, and African Americans as a whole, would ultimately reach. In the inter-war years there were indications that some scholars were willing to examine the more depressing realities of black life, most notably in a series of academic studies on lynching. The book discusses the approach of Du Bois to the academic studies on black migrants from a sociological perspective. When African American history began to command more serious attention in the mid-1960s, the generation of historians who had had direct personal experience of the Great Depression and the Second World War began to reach the age of retirement. The book also examines the achievements of race leaders like Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael, the Black Power Movement and Black Nationalism of the 1960s. In a 1996 study, political scientist Robert C. Scholarly debate on the African American experience from the 1890s through to the early 1920s gathered momentum with fresh studies on the spread of racial segregation and black migration to the cities. The rise of feminism and popularity of women's history prompted academic researchers to pay attention to the issue of gender in African American history. Stereotyped depictions of African Americans in US popular culture are also discussed.

An Interview with Raoul Peck
Leah Mirakhor

I Am Not Your Negro (2016) takes its direction from the notes for a book entitled “Remember this House” that James Baldwin left unfinished, a book about his three friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.— their murders, and their intertwining legacies. The film examines the prophetic shadow Baldwin’s work casts on twentieth- and twenty-first-century American politics and culture. Peck compiles archival material from Baldwin’s interviews on The Dick Cavett Show, his 1965 Cambridge lecture, and a series of banal images indexing the American dream. Juxtaposed against this mythology is footage of Dorothy Counts walking to school, the assassination of black leaders and activists, KKK rallies, and the different formations of the contemporary carceral state. Our conversation examines Peck’s role as a filmmaker and his relationship with the Baldwin estate. Additionally, we discussed a series of aesthetic choices he fought to include in the film’s final cut, directing Samuel L. Jackson as the voice for the film, the similarities and shifts he wanted to document in American culture since the 1960s, and some of the criticism he has received for not emphasizing more Baldwin’s sexuality.

James Baldwin Review
Kevern Verney

study of Martin Luther King highlights a paradox in the historiography of the post-war Civil Rights Movement, namely that historians working in this field have displayed a consistent tendency to focus their research on biographical studies of leading individuals. ‘Biographical accounts’, as the American historian Charles W. Eagles has noted, have ‘from the beginning and throughout the 1990s’ proved to be ‘perhaps the most popular form of study of the Civil Rights Movement’, both for ‘scholars and other writers’. 2 This was especially the case in respect to the first

in The Debate on Black Civil Rights in America
Abstract only
Kevern Verney

, such as the Great Migration, 1915–25, or lynching, attracted the attention of the wider American public. During the 1950s and 1960s the spread of more liberal attitudes and values, reflected in the rise of Martin Luther King and the post-war Civil Rights Movement, inspired scholars to investigate the African American past. They eloquently portrayed the historical sufferings of black communities and felt moral outrage at such racial injustice in a way that would have been incomprehensible for many earlier scholars, who saw such inequalities as natural and inevitable

in The Debate on Black Civil Rights in America
Kevern Verney

part, helps to explain why, until comparatively recently, the era has been less well researched by scholars than some other periods of African American history. The blossoming of interest in black history since the 1950s was, as has already been noted, directly linked to the rise of Martin Luther King and the post-Second World War Civil Rights Movement. In the first instance it was understandable that many scholars from the mid-1950s through to the 1980s should be more interested in analysing the dramatic changes that had taken place since the Second World War

in The Debate on Black Civil Rights in America
Kevern Verney

to new levels as a result of two specific developments. In February 1965 NOI members assassinated Malcolm X to silence him as an alternative, dissident voice to the Nation. Ironically, this murderous act had exactly the opposite effect. In death Malcolm X, like Martin Luther King three years later, attained the status of martyrdom, ensuring that he would continue to be an iconic figure for generations of African Americans to come. His place in history was further reaffirmed by the publication of his autobiography only a few months after his life was so cruelly cut

in The Debate on Black Civil Rights in America
Open Access (free)
Civil rites of passage
Sharon Monteith

), for example. But these films, like Spike Lee’s Malcolm X (1992) and A Huey P. Newton Story (2001), fall outside of the broad (predominantly white) mainstream cinematic tradition. More usually, black activists (CORE and SNCC) and protagonists (Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King Jr.) have been caught in an epistemological drift, their stories dispersed and scattered through narratives in which white

in Memory and popular film
An American perspective
Mary Woolley

15 Let freedom ring for science: an American perspective Mary Woolley Dr Martin Luther King’s immortal phrase ‘let freedom ring’ is as thrilling today as it was when he first uttered it in 1963. Now, nearly half a century since the 1968 assassination of one of the most revered civil rights and moral leaders of our time, we celebrate Dr King’s words as a touchstone and inspiration. With the famous march on Washington in 1963, Dr King attempted something extraordinary and the impact was enormous, driving social change and making an enduring difference in our

in The freedom of scientific research
Abstract only
Kevern Verney

of the black past increased dramatically during the 1950s and 1960s with the rise of Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement. Some historians, such as Leon Litwack, August Meier, Allan Spear and Howard Zinn, combined academic research into black history with active participation in the civil rights struggle. In a major departure from the Ulrich B. Phillips tradition, liberal white historians Kenneth Stampp and Stanley Elkins provided seminal new studies on slavery that examined the Peculiar Institution from the perspective of its black victims rather than

in The Debate on Black Civil Rights in America
Robbie McVeigh

a country profoundly divided and hierarchised by race. Much of the progress on racism has been contradictory and symbolic at best. The world-champion racing driver may be black, but the de facto ‘crime’ of ‘driving while black’ remains a key issue for many people of colour. And behind the reality of contemporary everyday racism, a series of political defeats mark a retrenchment of White Power rather than the triumph of equality. Ironically, the vision of Martin Luther King – that children be judged not by the colour of their skin but by the content of their

in Mobilising classics