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The marriage of Tudor England and Habsburg Spain

The co-monarchy of Mary I and Philip II put England at the heart of early modern Europe. This positive reassessment of their joint reign counters a series of parochial, misogynist and anti-Catholic assumptions, correcting the many myths that have grown up around the marriage and explaining the reasons for its persistent marginalisation in the historiography of Tudor England. Using new archival discoveries and original sources it argues for Mary as a great Catholic queen, while fleshing out Philip’s important contributions as king of England. It demonstrates the success and many positive achievements of this glittering dynastic union in everything from culture, music and art to cartography, commerce and exploration. Philip and Mary’s negative reputation derives from a particular version of English identity and reflects confessional differences in early modern English history. The acceptability of Mary’s foreign marriage will continue to reflect the evolving relationship between Britain and Europe, and its cultural politics. Moving from the commercial and strategic interests served by Anglo-Spanish alliances, it analyses the negotiations and marriage contract, Mary’s government, the Act for the Queen’s Regal Power, the Wyatt rebellion, the co-monarchy, gynophobic polemic, court culture and ceremony, bilingual lexicography, portraiture and print, and the historical (mis)fortunes of this glittering dynastic match.

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godmother of the association between popery and arbitrary (foreign) power’, but this ex post facto construction dates from long after their reign.5 The Marian period thus has the misfortune of lying right across the two major fault lines in England’s story; an indigenous religion recognised in the creation of a national Protestant church and divergence from European historical tradition. The culturally inflected nature of Mary I’s historical reputation is nowhere more apparent than in the contrast between her place in British history and in other European traditions

in Mary and Philip

This book studies the mother figure in English drama from the mid-sixteenth to the early seventeenth centuries. It explores a range of genres from popular mystery and moral plays to drama written for the court and universities and for the commercial theatres, including history plays, comedies, tragedies, romances and melodrama. Familiar and less-known plays by such diverse dramatists as Udall, Bale, Phillip, Legge, Kyd, Marlowe, Peele, Shakespeare, Middleton, Dekker and Webster are subject to readings that illuminate the narrative value of the mother figure to early modern dramatists. The book explores the typology of the mother figure by examining the ways in which her narrative value in religious, political and literary discourses of the period might impact upon her representation. It addresses a range of contemporary narratives from Reformation and counter-Reformation polemic to midwifery manuals and Mother's Legacies, and from the political rhetoric of Mary I, Elizabeth and James to the reported gallows confessions of mother convicts and the increasingly popular Puritan conduct books. The relations between tradition and change and between typology and narrative are explored through a focus upon the dramatised mother in a series of dramatic narratives that developed out of rapidly shifting social, political and religious conditions.

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:41 Plate 5  Andrea Mantegna/Guilio Campagnola, Judith and Holofernes, c. 1495–1500. Tempera on poplar panel. SAMSON 9781526142238 Plate Section (colour).indd 6 10/12/2019 14:41 Plate 6 Titian, Venus and Adonis, 1554. Oil on canvas. SAMSON 9781526142238 Plate Section (colour).indd 7 10/12/2019 14:41 Plate 7 Titian, Philip II in Wolfskin, 1549. Oil on canvas. SAMSON 9781526142238 Plate Section (colour).indd 8 10/12/2019 14:41 Plate 8  Hans Eworth, Mary I, 1554. Oil on canvas. SAMSON 9781526142238 Plate Section (colour).indd 9 10/12/2019 14:41 Plate 9  Anthonis

in Mary and Philip
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Conclusion A positive new vision of Mary I is emerging from the work of numerous scholars.1 This book has sought to build on and extend these ideas, foregrounding evidence for the joint reign’s importance from a constitutional, cultural, political and historical perspective. That England had a Spanish king in the sixteenth century still comes as a surprise to many, reflecting how resistant to revisionist history public and popular understandings of the period have proved. The argument has explored the dynamics of this exclusion, analysing why Mary and Philip

in Mary and Philip
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Jana Funke

’t think you’d even find yourself.” “I haven’t,” he said slowly, “I’ve been lost for years!” They all laughed; all except Miles himself. “I mean, it’s true,” he said. Eleanor turned to Mary Brearton. “I’m sorry, Mary, I haven’t introduced him. This is Miles, you’ve not met him before, I think. He’s a rather beautiful dancer.” Mary Brearton raised her eyes to his face; he was holding her hand absentmindedly. He dropped it at once but sat down beside her in the vacant place on the sofa. “Haven’t I met you – not here – somewhere else –? I seem to know you,” said Miles. She

in ‘The World’ and other unpublished works of Radclyffe Hall
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now I courageously plunged in and worked my arms briskly, without any fear, and pushed on courageously.’3 The map shows the field we called Foredoors. There was a duck pond at the higher end. The O’Bryans’ and my shared places sparked my interest in a name I would have passed by in any other location. For I too have a past, and William’s and mine intersect in interesting ways. We grew up in the same place, and both settled in New York State. Like Catherine but not Mary, I experienced involuntary emigration, and like Catherine, I learned to be an American. For the

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
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that our solicitude for the good administration and government of the kingdom causes us to consider that she [Mary I] had better contract an alliance with some Englishman’, and so ‘reassured of our intentions they may be less accessible to the schemes of the French and cease to dread having a foreigner, loathed as all foreigners are by all Englishmen, for their king’.39 Renard concurred with this, agreeing that ‘while the Duke of Northumberland lived the very fear of a foreign match was enough to cause several vassals to follow his faction and rise against the Queen

in Mary and Philip
The Queen’s currency and imperial pedagogies on Australia’s south-eastern settler frontiers

.) These artworks form part of a series of twelve coin images titled Oz Omnium Rex et Regina (King and Queen of all Oz). In this photographic series, Siwes reproduces the visual conventions of Australian state coinage, but uses profiles of Aboriginal people to represent the constructed regal personages of ‘Mary I’ and ‘George I’ in a reimagined future, from 2010 to 2042. The

in Mistress of everything

3 Wyatt and the queen’s regal power Wyatt’s revolt A definite conspiracy against Mary I was hatched on 26th November just over a week after her rejection of the parliamentary group led by Pollard to persuade her against a foreign match.1 Wyatt may have inherited his ‘anti-Catholic and anti-Spanish’ attitudes from his father, the poet, alleged lover of Anne Boleyn and Henrician ambassador to Spain.2 However, the elder Sir Thomas Wyatt had enjoyed ‘extraordinary, “inexpressible” favour’ from Charles, while they had treated of a marriage for Mary with Dom Luis of

in Mary and Philip