Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "Mary Sidney Wroth" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Victor Skretkowicz

-Simmern, Hubert Languet’s employer and Philip Sidney’s friend, Frederick IV assumed control over the Palatinate. Nurtured in the dynastic politics of Calvinism, Frederick IV married William of Orange’s daughter, Louisa Juliana. In 1613, when their son, the Elector Palatine Frederick V, married James I’s daughter Elizabeth, Mary Sidney Wroth’s father Robert was one of four ambassadors

in European erotic romance
Philhellene Protestantism, Renaissance translation and English literary politics

Relatively late manifestations of the European philhellene revival of Greco-Roman letters presented to readers complex, extended prose fiction in which the trials of love mask an implicit moral and political allegory. Inevitably, coming during the Reformation, Counter-Reformation and the Catholic Reformation, this cultural phenomenon was not without its religious and political dimensions. Longus, Achilles Tatius and Heliodorus were the three principal English exponents of rhetorically conscious Greco-Roman erotic romance. This book enhances the understanding of the erotic romances of Philip Sidney, Shakespeare, and Lady Mary Sidney Wroth by setting them within an integrated political, rhetorical, and aesthetic context. It investigates how Renaissance translators alter rhetorical styles, and even contents, to accord with contemporary taste, political agendas and the restrictions of censorship. Particular attention is paid to differences between the French courtly style of Jacques Amyot and François de Belleforest and the more literal translations of their English counterparts. Valuable perspective on the early translations is offered through the modern English versions in B.P. Reardon's Collected Ancient Greek Novels. The book considers the three texts of Sidney's Arcadia, as a political romance sharing many of the thematic and rhetorical concerns of the ancients. It focuses on a narrow range of Shakespeare's plays including Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra. The book identifies Mary Sidney Wroth's masque-like prose allegory, The Countess of Montgomery's Urania, as philhellene Protestant political propaganda.

Abstract only
Victor Skretkowicz

The ancient ‘love-and-adventure’ – or ‘ideal’ – prose romances 1 that inspire the erotic romances of Sir Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare and Lady Mary Sidney Wroth were written in Greek between the first and fourth centuries AD. While modern scholars know of ‘over twenty’ novels of this type, no more than five survive complete. Of these, only

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

Greco-Roman Romance of the Second Sophistic and the Renaissance Erotic romance, Middle Eastern in its provincial origins but European in its flavour, achieved a spectacular flourishing between 1579 and 1626 in the writings of Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586), William Shakespeare (1564–1616) and Mary Sidney Wroth (1587–1651/53). The

in European erotic romance
Abstract only
Victor Skretkowicz

European erotic romance offered Amyot the opportunity to teach his stylised Greco-Roman language and rhetoric, and, through it, Christian ethics, morality, and personal and political governance. It became the tool of nationalists. More theoretical politicisation of the genre occurred, initially by monarchomachist Protestant publishers and translators of Heliodorus, then by adapters such as Sir Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare and Mary Sidney wroth. Sidney's Defence of Poetry contains a parallel argument that clearly differentiates between an ideal factual history and a fictional allegory. If European erotic romance could contain semi-biographical personae, it was on the understanding that they should be heavily idealised to conform to the model characters created by the ancient sophists. Translators' and publishers' dedications by Protestant monarchomachists connected erotic romance with characters exhibiting political, cultural and intellectual superiority.

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

recurrent metaphors, Donne-like, into one another. As Mary Sidney Wroth would do in Urania , Greville veils personal criticisms in an evasive layer of rhetorical obfuscation. 65 Greville describes Elizabeth-Cleopatra as being seduced by tyrannical counsellors, particularly Lord Cobham, Robert Cecil and Sir Walter Ralegh: 66

in European erotic romance
Line Cottegnies

female lover-poet mourning her male lover’s absence and inconstancy in a sequence that explores the complex – sometimes contradictory – psychology of desire and despair of the neo-Petrarchan model.15 They both reflect, I argue, the ghostly resurrection of Sappho in the Renaissance, both as a famed poet and as an Ovidian persona. There was no English translation of Labé’s sonnets, but, as an aristo­ cratic woman, Wroth would, as noted, have spoken and read French.16 In fact, we know from a letter written by Lady Huntingdon that Mary Sidney (Wroth) was sent to the

in Early modern women and the poem
Victor Skretkowicz

Charikliea: Royal Foundling Heliodorus’s complex account of the love, separation, loss and reunion of Theagenes and Charikleia may well be ‘the longest comic plot in history’ 1 (except, perhaps, Mary Sidney Wroth’s). It underpins the themes of restoring usurped political and personal rights, of

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

, written in 1664–65 by Sidney’s grand-nephew, the regicide Algernon Sidney (1623–83), the son of Mary Sidney Wroth’s brother, Robert: God had separated them [i.e., the Israelites] from all other nations, was himself their king and lawgiver, placing over them a government that ought to have been an example to all other nations

in European erotic romance
Victor Skretkowicz

delectantur’ (B4). 58 Charikles’ desperation at being ‘sold for her money’ (1.8; Reardon, p. 181) parallels the predicament in which so many of Mary Sidney Wroth’s female characters find themselves, in The Countess of Montgomery’s Urania

in European erotic romance