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Sarah C. E. Ross

Chapter 2 Elizabeth Melville and the religious sonnet sequence in Scotland and England Sarah C. E. Ross T he lyrics in manuscript that Jamie Reid-Baxter has attributed to Elizabeth Melville, the Scottish religious poet and author of Ane Godlie Dreame (1603), include three sequences of religious sonnets, a poetic genre around which there clusters a language of ‘firsts’ in literary-critical discussion of the period. Anne Lock’s A Meditation of a Penitent Sinner (1560), a sequence of religious sonnets that paraphrase and expand on Psalm 51, has received extensive

in Early modern women and the poem
Diaspora remixed in the urban jungle
Caspar Melville

). Taking inspiration from Chicago and Detroit imports and the late 1980s influx of European variants like Italo-house and Belgian new beat, and rapidly assimilating the production techniques of house, techno and hip hop (Hesmondhalgh and Melville 2002), British producers started to use the newly available digital production tools – Roland drum machines like the TR-808 and TR-909, and especially the TR-303 bass synth that produced the wobbly acid basslines – to put their own stamp on dance music. The introduction of the Steinberg Cubase program in 1989, with its easy

in It’s a London thing
Brixton acid and rave
Caspar Melville

their bass-heavy hip hop and electro sets (Stan Shock interview, in Melville 1995: 20). In February 1988, away from the Ibiza-reunions, came a key moment in the transition from rare groove to house. At a series of ‘Hedonism’ parties in a print works in Alperton Lane, in unprepossessing Brent, west London, run by Simon Gordon with his brother Alun and a group of friends, inspired by a visit to New York where they had visited both the Paradise Garage and the intense gay club Tracks, the balance shifted towards house music. Simon Gordon, who derided rare groove as ‘stale

in It’s a London thing
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London’s sonic space
Caspar Melville

, 5 February 2011, accessed at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ukpolitics-12371994 on 15 July 2019.   3 My music journalism career reached its nadir in 1999 with an awkward encounter with Jennifer Lopez in New York, when my desire to discuss popular music in the context of wider cultural politics came up against the immoveable force of brand JLo. See Melville (2001).   4 Of course, this is completely contradicted by the brilliant writing of music journalists like Nick Cohn, Jon Savage, Greil Marcus, Ellen Willis, Val Wilmer, Richard Williams, Penny Reel, Simon Reynolds

in It’s a London thing
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London’s racial geography, 1960–80
Caspar Melville

also a business, providing precious and scare employment, training and inspiration: ‘[Sound system] gave me invaluable experience in business management’, says Stan Zepherin from the Shock sound system, ‘as well as inspiring me to study audio electronics’ (Melville 1995). Policing the sound Reggae music and the sound systems and associated institutions through which it was disseminated became in the 1970s prime loci of racialised conflict. The Notting Hill area was not only the site of violent racist attacks in 1958 but the focus of continual racial antagonism

in It’s a London thing
The Uncanny Shark
Nichole Neff

Sharks haunt the human imagination more than vampires, werewolves or ghosts. Sensational representations make the shark the villain of each piece as the top predator of even humanity. Yet since its Gothic beginnings in Anglophone representation, the shark has been the victim. The word sharke comes from slavers tongues when the first of its kind was brought ashore to be flayed, eaten, and its inner bowels excavated and examined. In reading and writing the shark, humanity opens up the belly of the beast to express the repressed and to give utterance to that which cannot be uttered– the uncanny. The argument that follows isnt that we should read the shark as a Gothic figure, but that we already do.

Gothic Studies
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The Chronotope of the Ghost Ship in the Atlantic World
Julia Mix Barrington

Ghost ships haunt Atlantic literature, but surprisingly few scholars have focused on these striking Gothic figures with any depth. Responding to this oversight, this essay introduces the chronotope of the ghost ship to the literary conversation, tracing it through four key transatlantic texts: Richard Henry Dana, Jr‘s Two Years Before the Mast (1840), a tale of the Flying Dutchman found in Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1821), The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), and Melville‘s novella Benito Cereno (1855). Wherever they appear in literature, ghost ships voice Gothic horror on the Atlantic; the strange temporality of the frozen yet eternally journeying ghost ship engenders in these texts a compulsion for communication with the living world. These Gothic missives bring uncomfortable and unspeakable subjects – particularly the moral terror of slavery – into the consciousness of more mainstream readers. To understand the ghost ship is to understand the Gothic double of Gilroy‘s Atlantic world.

Gothic Studies
How rare groove, acid house and jungle remapped the city
Author: Caspar Melville

This book discusses the emergence in London of three specific dance music multicultures in the context of the racialised city. Focusing on rare groove, acid house and jungle it places the emergence of these multi-racial music cultures in the context of theories of space and the historical forces which racialised the city in the late 20th century. Based on a wide range of original interviews with cultural producers – DJs, promoters, producers and dancers - undertaken over 20 years, read alongside cultural theory and contemporary accounts, it argues that music and the practices of space around music have been a crucial way in which racial segregation has been challenged and multiculture has emerged in London.

Caspar Melville

Using Henri Lefebvre’s notion of ‘diverting’ space this chapter analyses the emergence of warehouse parties in the mid-1980s, self-organised club culture in abandoned industrial buildings in the city, and the kinds of culture which emerged there. It discusses the context in which they emerged, the main innovators and the changes in club culture which drove the warehouse phenomenon. It also analyses the genre of rare groove - American soul and funk of the 1970s – which dominated the warehouse parties and discusses some of the key innovations of the era in terms of race and gender, particularly the activity of black women.

in It’s a London thing
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Music and the multicultural city
Caspar Melville

This chapter places the music scenes the book has discussed in the context of the politics of space and music in contemporary London. It considers the rise of the ‘plutocratic’ city’ in the early 21st century, and considers the emergences of subsequent music genres of grime, drill and new London jazz in terms of what they tell us about the contemporary state of London multiculture.

in It’s a London thing