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Matt Salyer

Marryat’s involvement with the Lower Canada Rebellion situated his encounter with civil war at its ‘most exterminating’ within the production of Phantom, the Cycle’s least conventional historical sea novel; it offered both a point of imaginative recursion and a concentrated image of his broader critique of the Early Republic. Just as the seamen of Midshipman Easy or The Naval Officer operate within multiple hierarchies at once, Marryat’s strangest yarn, replete with ghost ships and werewolves, operates across multiple genres and cultural formations. The common denominator for both the writer and the written in this case is multivalence – the ship that is both ship and ghost, the woman who is both mother and wolf, their writer who is both ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’, witness and contriver – but in this, Marryat the writer performs the same essential functions as imperial agents and colonial ‘factors’ do within Phantom: adjudication, translation, and open-ended transformation.

Gothic Studies
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Author: Steve Chibnall

Since his first directorial commission at Welwyn Studios in 1950, Lee Thompson has directed forty-five pictures for theatrical release, covering almost every genre of the cinema. His remarkable ability to adapt his style to suit the material has made him perhaps the most versatile director ever produced by Britain. This book intends to plot the trajectory of a unique film-maker through the typical constraints and opportunities offered by British cinema as a dominant studio system gave way to independent production in the two decades after the Second World War. Thompson was born in Bristol just before the First World War. By the time Thompson left school his ambition was to be an actor, and he joined Nottingham Repertory, making his debut in Young Woodley in 1931. Thompson's opportunity to direct a play came when he received an offer from Hollywood for the film rights to his play Murder Without Crime. His debut box (or ottoman) of tricks went out on the ABC circuit as a double bill with an American film about a GI finding romance in Europe, Four Days Leave. Although the cutting room remained sacrosanct, directors of Thompson's generation had more influence over the final cut of a picture than their predecessors. The Yellow Balloon may be frustratingly limited in its social critique, but as a piece of film making, it was rightly praised for its performances and technical proficiency.

Steve Chibnall

’ (Warren 1995 : 180). Running just 52 minutes with a modest cast of jobbing actors, it is described by Quinlan (1984: 131) as ‘a crudely radical crime story’ and ‘an inauspicious start to J. Lee Thompson’s long association with the cinema’. In fact, his first ‘association with the cinema’ had been as an actor in Carol Reed’s solo directorial debut Midshipman Easy (USA: Men of the Sea ) made at Ealing

in J. Lee Thompson
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Peter William Evans

director at Ealing, thereafter progressing to assistant director. An especially influential figure in those early days appears to have been Jack Ruben, with whom he worked as assistant director on Java Head (1934). Reed’s credits as assistant director include The Constant Nymph (1934), Sing as We Go (1934), and Lorna Doone (1935). His first solo directorial film, Midshipman Easy (1935), followed his contribution to the

in Carol Reed
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Girls in the news
Peter William Evans

the outset. Based on Captain Maryatt’s boys’ adventure novel, Mr Midshipman Easy , Reed’s Midshipman Easy is the story of the developing maturity of a young man. Easy begins his career at sea, with his precociousness a constant irritant to comrades and superiors. His catchphrase, ‘I should like to argue the point,’ may be the pretentious mannerism of the school debating society maestro but, more significantly, it draws

in Carol Reed
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Jeffrey Richards

. Marryat, observing how his adult novel Mr. Midshipman Easy (1836) had obtained wide popularity with boys, turned his energies to writing books specifically for boys, notably Masterman Ready (1841) and The Children of the New Forest (1847). The popularity of Marryat with boys of the period is attested in the autobiographical novels of Thomas Hughes ( Tom Brown’s Schooldays ) and Dean

in Imperialism and juvenile literature
Peter William Evans

was a project of Korda’s, it obviously appealed to Reed since it enabled him to explore familiar territory: foreign settings, and a parent/child narrative. But where, say, Midshipman Easy , The Way Ahead , The Young Mr Pitt and Odd Man Out concentrate on heroism, Outcast , as do Odd Man Out and The Third Man , reviews its underside. The exotic archipelago setting of Outcast provides many of the necessary

in Carol Reed
The Graham Greene films
Peter William Evans

Well before their collaboration on three of Reed’s most memorable films, Graham Greene (1980) wrote highly favourable reviews of Reed’s work. Midshipman Easy , Laburnum Grove and the Stars Look Down earn lavish praise for different reasons. In Midshipman Easy Greene admires the pace of the boys’ adventure yarn, surprisingly finding it possible even to enthuse over the young Hughie Greene in

in Carol Reed
Jeffrey Richards

-autobiographical novels like Peter Simple (1833) and Mr. Midshipman Easy (1836) proved as popular with boys as with adults, so much so that Marryat turned to writing specifically juvenile books with Masterman Ready in 1841. As the juvenile novel of adventure burgeoned two preeminent and prolific figures emerged to dominate the field: W.H.G. Kingston (1814–80) and R.M. Ballantyne (1825–94). Although both were active

in Popular imperialism and the military 1850–1950
Don Leggett

received no comprehensive training or experience in naval service, let alone risen to the top of their profession through years of activity and promotion. Chatfield’s arguments received a prompt response in the form of another article in the Metropolitan Magazine, this time clearly from the pen of its editor, Marryat. Marryat had served in the Royal Navy, rising to the rank of captain before resigning in 1830 to focus on writing naval novels, such as The Naval Officer, or, Scenes and Adventures in the Life of Frank Mildmay (1829) and Midshipman Easy (1836). His novels

in Shaping the Royal Navy