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The State of Innocence reconsidered
Matthew C. Augustine

Augustine: How John Dryden read his Milton 12 How John Dryden read his Milton: The State of Innocence reconsidered Matthew C. Augustine This essay begins with an unlikely scene, a pre-production panel sponsored by Legendary Pictures held at the 2011 San Diego International Comic Convention. Featured are director Alex Proyas, of The Crow and Dark City fame, and the actor Bradley Cooper, then making his turn from the B-list to perennial Oscar contender. At hand is the official announcement of a long-rumoured big-budget adaptation of John Milton’s biblical epic

in Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell
Rachel Hammersley

11 The comte de Mirabeau and the works of John Milton and Catharine Macaulay Introduction The case of the comte de Mirabeau is typical of the more general picture of the influence of British models and ideas during the French Revolution. For the most part, historians have either ignored or downplayed the British influences upon him. Even W. B. Fryer, who devoted an entire article to the subject of Mirabeau’s trip to England in the winter of 1784–85, concluded that: ‘English influence did not become a major factor on Mirabeau’s political career’.1 This verdict

in The English republican tradition and eighteenth-century France
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C. H. Herford
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
W. H. Semple
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Classical and Renaissance intertextuality
Author: Syrithe Pugh

For educated poets and readers in the Renaissance, classical literature was as familiar and accessible as the work of their compatriots and contemporaries – often more so. Their creative response to it was not a matter of dry scholarship or inert imitation, but rather of engagement in an ancient and lively conversation which was still unfolding, both in the modern languages and in new Latin verse. This volume seeks to recapture that sense of intimacy and immediacy, as scholars from both sides of the modern disciplinary divide come together to eavesdrop on the conversations conducted through allusion and intertextual play in works from Petrarch to Milton and beyond, and offer their perspectives on the intermingling of ancient and modern strains in the reception of the classical past and its poetry. The essays include illuminating discussions of Ariosto, Du Bellay, Spenser, Marlowe, the anonymous drama Caesars Revenge, Shakespeare and Marvell, and look forward to the grand retrospect of Shelley’s ‘Adonais’. Together, they help us to understand how poets across the ages have thought about their relation to their predecessors, and about their own contributions to what Shelley would call ‘that great poem, which all poets… have built up since the beginning of the world’.

Polemic and ideology in Heylyn’s 1630s writings
Anthony Milton

editions of Microcosmus would appear to have been published without Heylyn’s overview, but their publication simultaneously with his controversial writings for the government presents a strangely schizophrenic figure. It would not be until the 1650s that Heylyn would expound a more systematic and coherent ideology, but even then (as we shall see) his position was not always entirely consistent. NOTES 1 Lake, ‘Laudian style’; P. Lake, ‘The Laudians and argument from authority’ in B. Y. Kunze and D. D. Brautigam (eds), Court, Country and Culture (Rochester NY, 1992); Milton

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Anthony Milton

arguing his case in person, Heylyn was still exercising a decisive influence over the outward face of the Laudian church as late as the spring of 1640. NOTES 1 Nottingham University Library, Clifton Correspondence MS 309. I am grateful to Julia Merritt for this reference. 2 BL, Add. MS 46885A, fol. 39v. 3 Bodl., MS Top. Oxon. C.378, p. 283. I am grateful to Ken Fincham for this reference. 4 Ibid., p. 247. 5 Milton, ‘Creation’, p. 176; Walter Balcanquahall, The Honour of Christian Churches (1633); Bodl., Tanner MS 68, fol. 45; A. Milton, ‘The Laudian moment: conformist

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Heylyn and the Restoration church, 1660–1688
Anthony Milton

World and Thomas Mills’s The Catalogue of Honour (1613). Heylyn often fails to provide citations for his most frequently used sources, whereas he usually provides proper references for Latin classical adages or passages from Josephus. Some borrowings from historians such as Camden are hidden altogether (e.g. ER, I, p. 2). 39 ER, I, pp. 66, 77, 249. 40 E.g. ibid., I, pp. 13, 16–17, 20, 95–6, 144–5. 41 HQA, ii. p. 8; Milton, Catholic and Reformed, p. 313. Heylyn was not alone in using Harpsfield: Fuller also admitted using him (Appeal, i. p. 37). 218 Ecclesia

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
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Anthony Milton

restoration of altars in the 1630s’, HJ, 44 (2001), pp. 919–40; A. Milton, Catholic and Reformed (Cambridge, 1995). 8 P. Lake, The Boxmaker’s Revenge (Manchester, 2001), ch. 11, esp. p. 304; J. F. Merritt, ‘Puritans, Laudians and the phenomenon of church building in Jacobean London’, HJ, 41 (1998), pp. 936–60. 9 P. Lake, ‘The Laudian style’ in K. Fincham (ed.), The Early Stuart Church, 1603–1642 (1993). 10 CE, p. 11. 11 J. Peacey, Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (Aldershot, 2004), esp. pp. 273, 288. 12 Nevertheless, it

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
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Religion and politics in Heylyn’s career and writings
Anthony Milton

body of the clergy, if necessary (EV, i. pp. 80–1). 26 CA, pp. 301–2; Trott, ‘Prelude’, p. 240. 27 Thorndike, Discourse, pp. 338–9. 28 For a useful partial summary see CA, p. 51. 29 A. Milton, ‘ “Anglicanism” by stealth: the career and influence of John Overall’ in K. Fincham and P. Lake (eds), Religious Politics in post-Reformation England (Woodbridge, 2006). 30 HQA, ii. pp. 8, 9, 12. 31 Contrast D. MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer: a Life (New Haven CT, 1996). 32 HQA, ii. pp. 21–3. 33 See above, pp. 179, 206– 8; HQA, iii. pp. 90–2. 34 See above, pp. 178, 188n.167; CA, pp

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England