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Sven Meeder

15 Monte Cassino and Carolingian politics around 800 Sven Meeder Perhaps one of the earliest witnesses to a fundamental difference in Italian and French couture is a late-eighth-century letter from Monte Cassino. Its sharp observation of fashion differences is arguably still an accurate representation of the variation in dress on either side of the Alps: ‘the Gallic monks dress in more wide and more generous clothes, whereas the Italian monks, like ours, have shorter and tighter garments’.1 The text in question is not principally concerned with the apparently

in Religious Franks
Romanus Rios
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Religion and power in the Frankish Kingdoms: studies in honour of Mayke de Jong

This book, written in honour of Mayke De Jong, offers twenty-five essays focused upon the importance of religion to Frankish politics. It deals with religious discourse and political polemic in studies that take up the themes of identity, and the creative deployment of the language of the Old Testament within Frankish society. The book explores how the use of ethnic rhetoric in a Christian context shaped medieval perceptions of community. It shows that the Carolingian way of dealing with the Adoptionist challenge was to allow a conversation between the Spanish bishops and their Frankish opponents to take place. Charlemagne's role in the Vita Alcuini as a guardian of orthodoxy who sought to settle a controversy by organising and supervising a theological debate was striking. The book also discusses the admonition of an abbot of Frankish origin who came from southern France and made his monastic career in southern Italy. It showcases three letter manuscripts that share certain features but are different in other aspects. The first manuscript is a collection of the Moral Letters from Seneca to his pupil Lucilius , Paris , BnF, lat. 8658A. The book demonstrates that the lists of amici, viventes et defuncti reflected how the royal monastery was interacting with ruling elites, at different levels, and how such interactions were an essential part of its identity. It also examines the context of Monte Cassino's fading into the background, in the conviction that both political and religious concerns were at play.

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29 29 1 1 Notes & News Notes and news, July 1945 07 1945 29 29 1 1 1 1 48 48 10.7227/BJRL.29.1.1 Articles Monte Cassino 529-1944 Rios Romanus 07 1945 29 29 1 1 49 49 68 68 10.7227/BJRL.29.1.2 Concerning the reconstruction of the Aramaic Gospels Daube David 07 1945 29 29

Regino of Prüm and royal monastic conversion
Erik Goosmann and Rob Meens

the entry for the year 746.7 Following the ARF’s account of Carloman’s journey to Rome, his foundation of the monastery of St Sylvester on Mount Soratte and finally his journey to the monastery of Monte Cassino where he was made into a monk, Regino added a long digression about Carloman’s life as a monk. It related how Carloman, when he still resided at Monte Soratte, was venerated and lavishly praised because of his royal nobility and his rejection of earthly rule and secular glory. For fear of Regino, Chronicon, pp. 38–9. For doubts concerning the involvement of

in Religious Franks
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I. S. Robinson

became more intense. 1 The churchmen who opposed the claims of secular powers to control the Church’s possessions did so in the name of ‘reform’. By ‘reform’ they meant the restoration of the Church to the conditions of an earlier golden age of prosperity and freedom. Abbot Desiderius of Monte Cassino wrote of Pope Leo IX that ‘all ecclesiastical affairs were renewed and

in The Papal Reform of the Eleventh Century
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Kriston R. Rennie

III following suit in 801. 86 In 875, Pope John VIII became involved in the monastery of Flavigny, confirming that Charles the Bald had indeed given Bishop Adalgar of Autun rights over properties belonging to the monastery. 87 Both Pope Benedict III (855) and Nicholas I (863) confirmed the privileges for Corbie, which granted the monastery rights in abbatial election, freedom ( liberam ) and power ( potestas ) in all things necessary to follow the rule. 88 For Monte Cassino (784), Nicholas likewise ensured protection from episcopal interference, unless the bishop

in Freedom and protection
Graham A. Loud

Henry of Bavaria, the emperor’s son-inlaw, on the latter’s instructions and together with Pope Innocent, entered the Campania. 38 They pitched camp in the plain next to Monte Cassino, and sent the pope’s chaplain Richard, himself a monk of Cassino, to the monastery, telling them that if they were willing to receive them and show their obedience to Pope Innocent, then the latter would to the

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily
I. S. Robinson

(1 January 1047 in Colonna near Frascati), 179–81 (3 January in Rome), 183 (7 January in Colonna). He travelled by way of the abbey of Monte Cassino ( Chronicle of Monte Cassino II.78, pp. 322–3) to Capua ( D.H.III 184, 3 February). 209 Hunfried, archbishop of Ravenna (1047–51); Theoderic, bishop

in Eleventh-century Germany
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Kriston R. Rennie

-year pontificate, we know of seven genuine privileges for the monasteries of Monte Cassino ( c . 858–67), Fulda (863), Corbie (863), Flavigny (863), Saint-Denis (863), Saint-Calais (863), Vézelay and Pothières (863). Just as important to the history of exemption are five forgeries attributed to Nicholas for the monasteries of Subiaco (× 2, 859), Saint-Pierre-au-Mont-Blandin (863), Monte Cassino ( c . 858–67), and a grand privilege of liberties for all French monasteries (863). To be sure, understanding this pope’s association with the wider history of exemption requires some

in Freedom and protection