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The stories behind Egyptian mummies in museums
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Two mummies buried in a museum garden … a coffin that rotates … skulls amassed for dubious research … What if the most interesting stories about Egyptian mummies are not the ones you know?

Mummified explores the curious, unsettling and controversial stories of the Egyptian mummies held by museums in France and Britain. From powdered mummies consumed as medicine, to mummies unrolled in public, dissected for race studies and DNA-tested in modern laboratories, there is a lot more to these ancient human remains than meets the eye. Following mummies on their journeys from Egypt to museums and private collections in Paris, London, Leicester and Manchester, the book revisits the history of these bodies that have fascinated Europeans for so long.

Mummified explores stories of life and death, of collecting and viewing, and of interactions – sometimes violent and sometimes moving – that raise questions about the essence of what makes us human.

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Angela Stienne

A curator at the Musée du Louvre is cleaning the case where an ancient Egyptian man is resting. There is something stuck at the bottom of the case. Someone has attached a little piece of paper. On it is scribbled ‘reiveille toi!!!’ [sic] – wake up

in Mummified
Angela Stienne

to the Musée du Louvre, the presence of Egyptian mummies in France and England is the result of intentional, calculated enterprises to take these bodies out of their resting places and bring them back to Europe. Whatever the language used in museums and in the media, Egyptian mummies did not ‘arrive’ or ‘come’ to museums, they were displaced and then displayed

in Mummified
Abstract only
Angela Stienne

. Let me take you one last time to the Musée du Louvre. It is a quiet weekday morning. The walk to reach the mummy is rather long, but it is designed to take you on a journey. We are going to start this stroll in the reconstructed funerary chapel of Pharaoh Tuthmosis III. It is a somewhat hidden spot in the Louvre, but you will find it as you walk past the columns room and just before you walk

in Mummified
Abstract only
Angela Stienne

is an artificial set-up, aiming only to showcase an important man’s art collection. The location of this scene remains uncertain. 3 We do know that in 1813, the man in this picture lived at Quai Voltaire in Paris, and it is likely that this is where he posed for the picture. The items in the image were from his personal collection, rather than the museum he directed: the Musée du Louvre. 4 The

in Mummified
Philip J. Turner

). Vandier, J. (1961), Le Papyrus Jumilhac (Paris: Musée du Louvre).

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Essam El Saeed

’, Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 36, 137–46. Koenig, Yvan (ed.) (2002), La magie en Égypte: à la recherche d’une définition; actes du colloque organisé par le Musée du Louvre les 29 et 30 septembre 2000 (Paris: La Documentation Française). Koenig, Y. (2011), ‘Between order and disorder: a case of sacred philology’, in P.  Kousoulis (ed.), Ancient Egyptian Demonology: Studies on the Boundaries between the Demonic and the Divine in Egyptian Magic (Leuven: Peeters), 121–8. Koenig, Yvan (2013), ‘La magie égyptienne: de l’image à la ressemblance’, in M. Tardieu, A. Van den

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Elza Adamowicz

, reproduced in 391 12 (1920), 3. 16. Francis Picabia, Mouvement Dada, reproduced in Der Dada 4–5 (1919), 2. 17. The same year Marius de Zayas curated in New York an exhibition of French art, ranging from Ingres and Delacroix to Dadaists Francis Picabia, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes and Marcelle Duchamb [sic]. 18. J.-A.-D. Ingres, Oedipe et le sphinx (1827), oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre, Paris. La Feuille de vigne was painted over Les Yeux chauds, based on a technical drawing of a turbine brake (Camfield 1979: 169). 19. ‘Quand Ingres écrivit: “Le dessin est la

in Dada bodies
Angela P. Thomas

in the Musée du Louvre, Paris, whose form suggests that it was an architectural element from a building, as indeed does the upper part of the pillar statue in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens, also granodiorite. To these has been linked a part of such a statue in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo (JE 35258), with relief figures in siliceous limestone (Frood 2004: 133–5). Mariette had been informed by local sources that about forty years previously, namely in about the early 1820s, material had been taken by collectors and the agents of consuls from the Small

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Penelope Wilson

the south of the site adjacent to the village had also gone (Foucart 1898: 168–9, fig. 19), creating the ‘Great Pit’ and liberating statuary, bronzes and other treasures for museum and private collections. However, few objects that could be associated with the Royal Tombs have been recognised, suggesting that they have been destroyed and lost. Barbotin (2000) published part of what could be a royal sarcophagus in the Musée du Louvre, Paris (E32580), and in many ways the Louvre granite fragment represents the sad history of the Sais tombs. The block came from a

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt