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Sarah Hackett

disregarded or lost to history as they do not feature in written sources. 4 Indeed, Paul Thompson’s argument that oral history’s ability to focus on ‘the under-classes, the unprivileged, and the defeated’ leads to both ‘a much fairer trial’ and ‘a more realistic and fair reconstruction of the past’ has most certainly struck a chord with migration historians. 5 This chapter draws upon oral history interviews conducted with members of Wiltshire’s Muslim migrant communities. Through the interviews, migrants’ narratives and histories, and thus the ‘human’ side of the

in Britain’s rural Muslims
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Europeans, Muslim Immigrants and the onus of European–Jewish Histories
Author: Amikam Nachmani

Relations between Europe and its Muslim minorities constitute an extensive focus for discussion both within and beyond the Continent. This book reports on the years mainly between 2005 and 2015 and focuses on the exploitation of recent European history when describing relations and the prospects for the nominally 'Christian' majority and Muslim minority. The discourse often references the Jews of Europe as a guiding precedent. The manifold references to the annals of the Jews during the 1930s, the Second World War and the Holocaust, used by both the Muslim minorities and the European 'white' (sic) majority presents an astonishing and instructive perspective. When researching Europe and its Muslim minorities, one is astonished by the alleged discrimination that the topic produces, in particular the expressions embodied in Islamophobia, Europhobia and anti-Semitism. The book focuses on the exemplary European realities surrounding the 'triangular' interactions and relations between the Europeans, Muslims and Jews. Pork soup, also known as 'identity soup', has been used as a protest in France and Belgium against multicultural life in Europe and against the Muslim migrants who allegedly enjoyed government benefits. If the majority on all sides of the triangle were to unite and marginalize the extreme points of the triangle, not by force but by goodwill, reason and patience, then in time the triangle would slowly but surely resolve itself into a circle. The Jews, Christians, Muslims and non-believers of Europe have before them a challenge.

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The Holocaust as a yardstick
Amikam Nachmani

3 Haunted presents: the Holocaust as a yardstick The memory of the Holocaust is intensively used, often as a theoretical and practical yardstick, by both Muslim migrant minorities and the European ‘white’ majority. The fate of European Jewry in World War II is highly discernible in the perceptions and mutual relations between Europe and its Muslim migrants. Muslim migrants’ attitudes towards the Holocaust’s legacy constitute a useful starting point. With necessary caution one can say that, with exceptions, Muslims in Europe are ill-disposed to accept that the

in Haunted presents
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Europe and its Muslim minorities
Amikam Nachmani

1 Hectic times: Europe and its Muslim minorities Introduction A good quotation should do the job of introducing the reader to a work’s content, its mood and ambiance. Each one of the quotations in the preceding pages could serve as a motto for a book about Europe and its Muslim migrant minorities; several of them directly concern our work on the ‘triangle’, that is to say, the perceptions held by Europeans, Muslims and Jews about each other and the current encounter between Europeans and Muslim migrants. They indicate that European–Jewish precedents have been

in Haunted presents
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European opposition, Muslim migrants, impact on Jews
Amikam Nachmani

4 In the same boat: European opposition, Muslim migrants, impact on Jews Pork soup (soupe au cochon), also known as ‘identity soup’, has been used as a protest in France and Belgium against multicultural life in Europe and against the Muslim migrants who allegedly enjoyed government benefits, so much so that very little was left for needy Europeans. Since the winter of 2003 homeless people have been served with hot pork soup made of the ears, tail and legs of the poor animals. Theoretically, the pork menu is a guarantee that Muslims (and Jews) will not frequent

in Haunted presents
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Muslim integration, the rural dimension and research implications
Sarah Hackett

idyll. These include Bangladeshis, Indians, Moroccans, Pakistanis and Turks who have settled across the county throughout the post-1960s period, and whose everyday lives and ethnic and religious identities have played out against the county’s rural landscape. This book does not claim to have addressed all aspects of the Muslim migrant experience or local government approach in Wiltshire, nor to have assessed all of the various actors and dimensions relevant to the integration process. Previous chapters have already touched upon some of this study’s key arguments and

in Britain’s rural Muslims
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Diverse Muslims, unexplored communities
Sarah Hackett

milestones, and the number of major roads and railway lines that dissect the county’s rural landscape, are evidence that Wiltshire has long held the role of thoroughfare between London, Bath, Bristol and Exeter, and thus has often been a place of passage rather than a destination in its own right. There are nevertheless several reasons why Wiltshire is a pertinent case study for an assessment of Muslim migrant integration in rural Britain. Firstly, it is home to a range of settled Muslim minority communities who are rarely recognised as being part of the county’s post

in Britain’s rural Muslims
Sarah Hackett

, and the experiences of, certain segments of Britain’s rural populations, for example women, youth and the homeless. 10 Regarding the academic sphere, whilst much work has been done since Chris Philo’s 1992 claim that Britain was characterised by what he coined ‘neglected rural geographies’, 11 rural space nevertheless remains overlooked in comparison to urban settings across a range of disciplines and areas of research. This chapter places the integration of Muslim migrant communities in post-1960s Wiltshire within this context of rural Britain. It builds upon

in Britain’s rural Muslims
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Brighter European–Muslim–Jewish futures?
Amikam Nachmani

7 Conclusion: brighter European– Muslim–Jewish futures? The encounter between Muslims and the West has never been easy. Crusaders, the Reconquista, the Bosnian massacre in the 1990s are but a few of the painful events in a long history, randomly chosen, that are often referred to and employed towards an agenda. The present encounter is proving even more difficult than previous confrontations between Europe and its Muslim migrants and refugees. The latter are strongly inclined to empathise and identify with their co-religionists who face troubles and problems in

in Haunted presents
The early years, 1960s to 1976
Sarah Hackett

strategies. It charts local policy through to the arrival of the first waves of post-war Muslim immigration to the county, and offers an insight into how policymakers in Wiltshire perceived and addressed the integration, accommodation and experiences of Muslim migrants. In general, immigration and integration policy during this period at the local level in Britain has not been thoroughly explored. Although studies examining the local level are nothing new, it has not been until the twenty-first century that the importance of locality in devising and implementing migration

in Britain’s rural Muslims