Addressing the consequences of conflict and trauma in Northern Ireland
Author: David Bolton

Conflict poses considerable challenges for services that support communities, and in particular those affected by violence. This book describes the work undertaken in Omagh against the background of the most recent period of violent conflict in Ireland, and specifically it draws upon the work following the Omagh bombing. The bombing came just four months after the Northern Ireland peace agreement, known formally as the Belfast Agreement of 1998, and more informally as the Good Friday Agreement. The book describes the impact of the bomb and the early responses. Local trade unions, employers and the business community played key roles at times, particularly in underlining the need for solidarity and in identifying themselves with the desire for peace. The book looks at the outcome of needs-assessments undertaken following the Omagh bombing. The efforts to understand the mental health and related impact of the violence associated with the Troubles in Northern Ireland over the period 1969 to 2015 are focused in detail. The later efforts to build services for the benefit of the wider population are described, drawing upon the lessons gained in responding to the Omagh bombing. The developments in therapy, in training and education, and in research and advocacy are described with reference to the work of the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT). The book draws together key conclusions about the approaches that could be taken to address mental health and well-being as an essential component of a peace-building project.

David Bolton

about and change methods and practice, and to contribute to wider learning through audit and research. Research as a core programme of the NICTT As the work of the Omagh Community Trauma and Recovery Team was drawing to a close (2000–2001), the proposals for what became the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT) were being developed, and from an early stage

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

This chapter describes the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT)’s training development and delivery programmes over ten years, focusing in particular on vocational training. The aim was to build the skills base of existing practitioners by providing a number of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and trauma-related skills courses. The approach taken was

in Conflict, peace and mental health
A comprehensive trauma centre
David Bolton

This chapter describes the origins of the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT). It briefly outlines the philosophical and theoretical foundations of the Centre and the evidence base upon which its mission and work was developed. Each of the key areas of work is briefly outlined. The role of a not-for-profit agency working in conventional public sector funding

in Conflict, peace and mental health
Abstract only
David Bolton

, along with Chapters, 7 , 8 and 9 , with reference to the work of the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT), describes developments in therapy, in training and education, and in research and advocacy. Finally, Chapter 10 seeks to draw together key conclusions about the approaches that could be taken to address mental health and well-being as an essential component of a peace

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

proportion of the population has been exposed to direct experiences of violence and, therefore, how extensive is the risk to and impact upon the well-being of the population? These questions were subsequently addressed in the NICTT-UU series of studies, discussed below. The legacy of the Troubles: 2005 In 2005, Muldoon et al. reported upon the breadth of

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

strategy for responding to the bombing (Bolton, 1998 ), the decision was taken to close the Team in 2001. The consultations were followed by the establishment of a new organisation, the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT), with the aim of building upon the earlier work for the benefit of the wider population affected by the Troubles. The new Centre’s programmes were to

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

Trauma and Transformation (NICTT) within which the competences of workers operating in key parts of the trauma stepped-care system are outlined. Assuming the levels of need are known, including the projected needs over a number of years, an audit of existing services practitioners and skills against planned levels of service will establish what further development is needed. This will inform workforce

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

services. This advocacy on behalf of those suffering psychological problems significantly influenced the work of the original Omagh Team and later the NICTT, and the Fund provided financial support to several local organisations so that therapeutic services were available to people affected by the bombing. Ceremonial and arts-based responses to the bombing In Northern Ireland

in Conflict, peace and mental health